Agenda Item 4E
November 15,2016
Action
MEMORANDUM
November 10,2016
TO:
FROM:
SUBJECT:
County Council
f)/.___l
~
Josh Hamlin, Legislative
Attorney~
Action:
Bill 28-16, Solid Waste (Trash) - Strategic Plan to Advance Composting,
Compost Use and Food Waste Diversion
Transportation, Infrastructure, Energy and Environment Committee recommendation (2­
0): Enact Bill 28-16 with amendments
Bill 28-16, Solid Waste (Trash) - Strategic Plan to Advance Compo sting, Compost Use
and Food Waste Diversion, sponsored by Lead Sponsor Council Vice President Berliner and Co­
Sponsors Councilmembers Katz, Hucker, EIrich, Riemer and Navarro was introduced on June 28,
2016. A public hearing was held on July 19 and a Transportation, Infrastructure, Energy and
Environment Committee worksession was held on October 27.
Bill 28-16 would require the Director of the Department of Environmental Protection
(DEP) to develop a Strategic Plan to Advance Compo sting, Compost Use and Food Waste
Diversion in Montgomery County by July 1,2017. In developing the Strategic Plan, the Director
would be required to consult with many organizations inside and outside of County government.
The Strategic Plan would provide recommendations on legislative changes necessary to reduce
food waste and promote compo sting as well as identify potential new county policies and
initiatives to reduce food waste and promote and support composting in the County. The Director
would be required to submit an annual report on the progress toward achieving the goals of the
Strategic Plan by July 1 of each year.
A memorandum from the Lead Sponsor begins on ©7. The Fiscal and Economic Impact
statements are at ©9-12.
The Committee !ecommended (2-0) enactment of the Bill with the following amendments:
1.
change the initial due date for the Strategic Plan from July 1,2017 to October 1,2017;
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2. remove language requiring consideration of the environmental impact of upcounty trash
haulers and insert in its place consideration of strategies for maximizing the volume of
compostables collected; and
3. add the Maryland Horse Council and the governing bodies of all County municipalities to
the list of stakeholders to be consulted in formulating the Strategic Plan.
Public Hearing
There were twelve speakers at the public hearing. Eileen Kao, Chief of the Waste
Reduction and Recycling Section ofDEP recognized that the Bill is consistent with County efforts
to reduce waste and increase recycling, but noted that the Executive has concerns about the Bill's
requirement that DEP develop the strategic plan by July 1, 2017, and its requirement that the
strategic plan include consideration of the environmental impact of upcounty residential trash
haulers (©13). Aliza Fishbein of the County Agricultural Advisory Committee spoke in support
of the Bill, noting that it was a step in expanding the practice of composting beyond farms (©14­
15). Heather Bruskin, manager of the Montgomery County Food Council spoke in support of the
Bill, and offered several recommendations for components of a County "infrastructure
deVelopment strategy" (©16-18).
Ryan Walter, co-founder of the Compost Crew, LLC, a County small business engaged in
the collection and management of organic waste, spoke in support of the Bill, noting that
expanding food waste composting is vital to the County's economic, environmental, and social
sustainability (©19). Cheryl Kollin of Community Food Rescue also offered support for the Bill
which she said will expand food waste diversion strategies and reduce waste (©20-21). Doug
Alexander of BackyardComposting.org spoke of the virtues of small-scale compo sting and
addressed many ofthe concerns - vermin, smell, etc. - related to residential composting (©22-23).
Brenda Platt of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance also supported the Bill, saying "it is critical
for establishing the framework for a comprehensive strategy" for expanding compost production
and use ©24-25). Susan Eisendrath offered support for the Bill arid provided information about
how small-scale composting works (©26-27).
Brian Ditzler of the Sierra Club spoke in support of the Bill, with a focus on the impact it
could have on reducing County waste (©28-29). Kit Gage of Friends of Sligo Creek offered
support for the Bill, noting that widespread
turf
application of compost use would have a positive
impact on soil health (©30-31). Paul Tukey of Glenstone offered an example of how compo sting
contributes to increasing recycling rates (©32). Finally, Anne Sturm of the Sugarloaf Citizens
Association spoke in support of the Bill and stressed the importance of locating compost facilities
in a decentralized way throughout the County (©33).
Committee DiscussionlRecommendations
1.
Should the July 1, 2017 due date for the development of the strategic plan be
extended?
In
her public hearing testimony, DEP's Eileen Kao expressed the Executive's concern
regarding the Bill's requirement that the Director of DEP develop the strategic plan by July 1,
2
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2017. She suggested that January 1, 2018 is a more appropriate date. In a letter dated July 27,
2016, the County Planning Board concurred with this suggestion (©37).
The Bill requires the Director to include a number of specific components, based on
identified considerations, in the strategic plan (see ©3, lines 35-51). The Bill also requires the
Director, in formulating the strategic plan, to consider a number of factors (see (3 -4, lines 52-71).
Each of these requirements - content and considerations - will likely involve significant research
and analysis.
In addition to the above referenced required considerations and content, the Bill requires
the Director to consult with a wide variety of stakeholders - 14 are specifically identified, and
.there is also a more general "organizations and individuals involved ... " provision (see ©4-5, lines
72-91). Scheduling meetings with all of the stakeholders may take some time, in addition to the
research and analysis required to make all of the requisite identifications/recommendations. The
Bill was introduced on June 28; had it been quickly enacted, a July 1,2017 deadline for the initial
plan may have been feasible. However, because of the requirements in developing the plan and the
fact that the Bill will not be enacted before late 2016, Council staff agrees that a July 1, 2017
deadline for the initial plan may be overly ambitious, particularly given the Bill's likely date of
enactment. Changing the initial due date to October 1, 2017, while three months earlier than DEP' s
requested January 1,2018 deadline, should allow DEP to generate a robust plan.
Committee recommendation (2-0): amend line 34 to change the initial due date for the
strategic plan from July 1,2017 to October 1,2017.
2.
Should consideration of the impact of upcounty trash haulers be included in the
strategic plan?
One of the required considerations that the Director must take into account is "the
environmental impact of residential trash hauling by private haulers in up county solid waste
service districts" (see ©4, lines 70-71).
In
her public hearing testimony, Eileen Kao expressed the
Executive's view that this provision is not appropriate to be included in the context of this Bill.
DEP has submitted additional comments on this provision which generally express the view that
a provision related to certain
trash
haulers is not relevant to the development of a strategic plan to
advance compo sting (See ©38).
Council staff agrees that the environmental impact of up county residential trash haulers,
while a valid issue, is not particularly pertinent to Bill 28-16's objectives. Examining best practices
and pickup patterns of trash haulers may provide insight into how best to implement a successful,
efficient curbside compost collection program, but would only be one component of a strategy to
maximize the volume of compostables collected. Staff suggested substituting broader language
focused on maximizing collection volume in place of the reference to trash haulers.
Committee recommendation (2-0): amend lines 71-72 of the Bill as follows:
.Q2}
[[the environmental impact of residential trash hauling
Qy
private
haulers in upcounty solid waste service districts.]] strategies for
3
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maximizing the volume of compostables collected
in
a curbside
collection program.
3.
Should additional Stakeholders be added to those included in the Bill?
The Council received letters from the Maryland Horse Council (©38-41) and the City of
Rockville (©42) asking that additional stakeholders be added to those listed in subsection (d) of
§48-17B (see ©4-5, lines 75-92). The Maryland Horse Council asked that it be added as a
stakeholder, citing the value and underutilization of horse manure as a substrate for compost. The
City of Rockville asked that all County municipalities be included in the compo sting strategic
planning process. Including the Horse Council and municipalities in the planning process is
reasonable, and their participation could enhance the process and contribute to the ultimate success
of any plan.
Committee recommendation (2-0):
amend lines 92-96 as follows:
o.±)
Community Food Rescue; [[and]]
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the Maryland Horse Council;
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4.
the governing bodies of all County municipalities: and
organizations and individuals in the County involved in compost
production and use and food waste diversion.
How will the recently issued Request for Proposals (RFP) for a Food Waste Processing
Facility affect the Strategic Plan?
DEP provided the Committee with a summary of an RFP issued on September 9, 2016 at
DEP' s request by the Northeast Maryland Waste Disposal Authority "to provide for the processing
of Acceptable Organics to include food residuals and food-soiled paper." (See ©44) While this
RFP is not directly related to Bill 28-16, and its issuance does not impact the Bill's provisions, it
is pertinent to the broader discussion of how the County handles the increasing utilization of
compo sting as a recycling strategy. The summary provided by DEP includes information on the
County's commitment to deliver compostables, pricing, and the term of the contract.
Representatives from DEP discussed the goals and objectives in issuing the RFP, and indicated
that it would not interfere with the formulation or execution of a Strategic Plan.
This packet contains:
Bill 28-16
Legislative Request Report
Sponsor memorandum
Fiscal and Economic Impact statements
Public hearing testimony
4
Circle
#
1
6
7
9
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Eileen Kao, DEP
Aliza Fishbein, Agricultural Advisory Committee
Heather Bruskin, County Food Council
Ryan Walter, Compost Crew, LLC
Cheryl Kollin, Community Food Rescue
Doug Alexander, BackyardComposting.org
Brenda Platt, Institute for Local Self-Reliance
Susan Eisendrath
Brian Ditzler, Sierra Club
Kit Gage, Friends of Sligo Creek
Paul Tukey, Glenstone
Anne Sturm, Sugarloaf Citizens Association
Selected Correspondence
Solid Waste Advisory Committee, July 14,2016
Planning Board, July 18,2016
Planning Board, July 27,2016
Maryland Horse Council
City of Rockville
DEP Comments on Private Refuse Haulers
DEP Summary ofRFP
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Bill No.
28-16
Concerning: Solid Waste ITrash) ­
Strategic
Plan
to
Advance
Comoosting. Compost Use and Food
Waste Diversion
Revised:
10/27/2016
Draft No. ---"<....8_
Introduced:
June 28, 2016
Expires:
December 28. 2017
Enacted: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Executive: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Effective: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Sunset Date: ---!...!N""on""'e::....-_ _ _ _ __
Ch, _ _, Laws of Mont. Co. _ __
COUNTY COUNCIL
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND
Lead Sponsor: Vice President Berliner
Co-Sponsors: Councilmembers Katz, Hucker, Eirich, Riemer and Navarro
AN
ACT to:
(1)
(2)
require the Director of the Department of Environmental Protection to develop a
Strategic Plan to Advance Compo sting, Compost Use and Food Waste Diversion in
Montgomery County
generally amend County laws related to Solid Waste (Trash).
By adding
Montgomery County Code
Chapter 48, Solid Waste (Trash)
Section 48-1 7B
Boldface
Underlining
[Single boldface brackets]
Double underlining
[[Double boldface brackets]]
* * *
Heading or defined term.
Added to existing law
by
original
bill.
Deletedfrom existing law
by
original
bill.
Added
by
amendment.
Deleted from existing law or the
bill by
amendment.
Existing law uncif.fected
by bill.
The County Council for Montgomery County, Maryland approves the following Act,·
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BILL
No. 28-16
1
Sec.
1.
Section 48-17B is added as follows:
48-17B. Strategic Plan to Advance Composting, Compost Use and Food Waste
Diversion in Montgomery County.
(ill
Legislativefindings.
The County Council fmds that:
2
3
4
5
ill
the County's general goal of solid waste management establishes
waste reduction as the most preferred management technique,
followed
Qy
reuse, composting and recycling, then incineration
with energy recovery, and, least preferred, landfilling;
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
ill
ill
ill
ill
food waste represents
solid waste stream;
~
significant percentage of the County's
educating food producers can reduce the generation of excess
food that would enter the solid waste stream;
giving food that would otherwise be wasted to organizations that
serve people in need is
~
means to reuse excess food;
composting,
~
means promoting the biological decomposition of
~
organic material such as food waste into
stable, htimus-like
17
18
product, is
~
first step in the recycling of food waste;
®
the use of compost has been demonstrated to benefit soil health
~
19
20
21
(A)
.ill)
(Q)
suppressing plant diseases and pests;
reducing or eliminating the need for chemical fertilizers;
Promoting higher yields of agricultural crops; and
Improving soil structure;
is
~
22
23
ill)
24
25
26
ill
compost use
valuable tool in stormwater management that
can lower runoff volume due to improved water holding capacity,
healthy vegetationlbiomass, and increased infiltration; and
27
®
reducing excess food generation, reusing food that would
otherwise be wasted, and increasing the amount of food and other
0:\law\billS\1628 strategic plan to advance food waste composting\bill8.doc
28
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BILL
No.
28-16
29
30
31
32
33
34
compostable waste that is composted will help the County meet
its goal of recycling 70% of the solid waste stream generated in
the County.
(hl
Strategic Plan required.
The Director must develop
~
Strategic Plan to
Advance Composting, Compost Use and Food Waste Diversion in
Montgomery County hy [[July]] October
must identify:
.L
2017. The Strategic Plan
35
36
37
38
39
40
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legislative changes, including but not limited to amendments to
this Chapter, necessary to reduce food waste and promote
composting;
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ill
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County policies and initiatives to reduce food waste ·and promote
and support compo sting in the county;
models and best practices used hy other jurisdictions
metrics for assessing and increasing food waste diversion,
composting, and compost use;
goals for achieving certain levels of food waste diversion and
dates for achieving those goals;
challenges to achieving the goals and means of overcoming these
challenges;
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
ill
tID
(2}
potential sites for food waste composting operations;
environmental and public health benefits of compo sting and food
waste diversion; and
cost estimates and potential economic and environmental benefits
of implementing the Strategic Plan
52
53
54
W
Considerations.
The Strategic Plan must consider the following areas in
its legislative, policy, metrics, and cost recommendations:
55
56
ill
ill
home composting;
-3
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BILL 1\10.28-16
57
58
59
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72
73
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@
ill
ill
ill
®
ill
on-site institutional and commercial composting;
on-farm composting;
small-scale commercial composting facilities;
support for existing and new composting businesses in the form
of grants, loans, and land;
models and best practices, including methods and materials, used
Qy
other jurisdictions;
rn
(2}
use of incentives to encourage private food waste diversion and
composting; and
diversion and composting of non-food waste compostables;
QQ)
local use of compost to support soil health and the County
stormwater management program;
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education and outreach to reduce food waste and promote
composting; and
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[[the environmental impact of residential trash hauling
Qy
private
haulers in upcounty solid waste service districts.]] strategies for
maximizing the volume of compostables collected in a curbside
collection program.
Consultation with stakeholders.
In developing the Strategic Plan, the
Director must consult with:
ill
the County Division of Solid Waste Services;
ill .
the County Department of Permitting Services,
Divisions;
including the
Land Development and Zoning and Site Plan Enforcement
ill
ill
ill
®
the County Department of Health and Human Services;
the County Department of General Services;
Montgomery County Public Schools;
4
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BILL
No. 28-16
85
ill
the County Parks Department;
the County Office of Agriculture;
the County Revenue Authority;
86
87
tID
(2)
88
89
Q.Q}
the Montgomery County Food Council;
Ql}
the Montgomery Countryside Alliance;
90
91
Q2}
the County Solid Waste Advisory Committee;
Q.I}
the University of Maryland Extension;
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
Q.i}
Community Food Rescue;
[[and]]
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the Maryland Horse Council;
(lQ)
the governing bodies of all County municipalities; and
llZ1
organizations and individuals in the County involved in compost
production and use and food waste diversion.
W
Annual report.
By July
1
each year, the Director must submit
~
report to
the County Executive and County Council. The annual report must:
ill
ill
Approved:
update the food waste diversion metrics; and
document the progress towards achieving the goals of the
Strategic Plan.
102
103
Nancy Floreen, President, County Council
Date
104
Approved:
105
Isiah Leggett, County Executive
Date
106
This is a correct copy ofCouncil action.
107
Linda M. Lauer, Clerk ofthe Council
Date
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LEGISLATIVE REQUEST REPORT
Bill 28-16
Solid Waste (Trash)
-
Strategic Plan to Advance Composting, Compost Use and Food
Waste Diversion
DESCRIPTION:
Bill 28-16 would require the Director of the Department of
Environmental Protection to develop a Strategic Plan to Advance
Compo sting, Compost Use and Food Waste Diversion in
Montgomery County by July 1, 2017, and report annually on
meeting the goals of the Plan.
The County has a goal of recycling 70% of the solid waste stream
generated in the County by the end of 2020. Food waste represents a
significant percentage ofthe County's solid waste stream.
PROBLEM:
GOALS AND
OBJECTIVES:
Develop a County strategy for reducing excess food generation,
reusing food that would otherwise be wasted, and increasing the
amount of food and other compostable waste that is composted.
COORDINATION: Department of Environmental Protection
FISCAL IMPACT: Office of Management and Budget
ECONOMIC
IMPACT:
EVALUATION:
EXPERIENCE
ELSEWHERE:
SOURCE OF
INFORMATION:
Office of Finance
To be researched.
To be researched.
Josh Hamlin, Legislative Attorney, 240-777-7892
APPLICATION
WITIDN
MUNICIP ALITIES:
NI
A
PENALTIES:
NI
A
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MONTGOMERY COUNTY COUNCIL
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND
ROGER BERLINER
TRANSPORT ATlON, INFRASTRUCTURE
DISTRICT 1
CHAIRMAN COUNCILMEMBER
ENERGY
&
ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE
MEMORANDUM
June 21,2016
TO:
Council President Nancy Floreen
Council Colleagues
Council Vice President Roger Berliner
Legislation to Create A Strategic Plan to Advance Composting and Food Waste Diversion
FROM:
RE:
Colleagues, I am writing to ask you to join me in co-sponsoring legislation that I will be introducing
next week. Several years ago, this Council established an ambitious, yet important goal of recycling 70% of our
County's solid waste stream generated by 2020. Food waste currently represents a significant percentage ofthe
County's solid waste stream. Ifwe are to meet our ambitious goal, we will need to make significant progress on
reducing the amount of food thrown away.
One way that we can reduce the amount of food waste we throwaway is through composting. As you
well know, there are many agricultural, environmental, and health benefits to compo sting. And there are an
array of public and private sector entities in this county already doing a lot to promote composting and stand
ready to help expand the practice throughout the county.
However, there are certain challenges that stand in the way of allowing our county to take our collective
compo sting efforts to the next level. We can and must do more home and community-scale composting; we
must identify and secure a location for a large-scale compo sting operation; and we must continue to incentivize
our agricultural and business communities to produce and use compost as a best practice.
In order to pull together all of the various stakeholders to achieve this, I am proposing the attached
legislation, which would require the Director of our Department of Environmental Protection to develop a
Strategic Plan to Advance Composting, Compost Use, and Food Waste Diversion in Montgomery County by
July 1,2017. The Strategic Plan would provide recommendations on legislative changes necessary to reduce
food waste and promote compo sting as well as identify potential new county policies and initiatives to reduce
food waste and promote and support compo sting in the County.
It
will give us models and best practices used
by other jurisdictions and establish metrics and clear goals for increasing food waste diversion and composting.
In crafting this legislation, I have worked in close consultation with some of the key stakeholders that
are leaders in the composting realm, including the Montgomery County Food Council, the Montgomery
Countryside Alliance, and our Department of Environmental Protection. Their feedback has been incorporated
into the attached legislation. As with my bill to create a strategic plan to address food insecurity, I recognize
(j)
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STELLA B. WERNER OFFICE BUILDING • 100 MARYLAND AVENUE, 6
TH
FLOOR, ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20850
240-777-7828 OR 240-777-7900, TTY 240-777-7914, FAX 240-777-7989
WWW.MONTGOMERYCOUNTYMD.GOV
that a strategic plan by itself will not solve the many complexities associated with an issue such as compo sting.
But our solid waste goals are too important and the potential benefits of expanded composting are too great for
our county not to have a more unified sense of direction as to how we achieve both.
Thank you for your consideration of this legislation, and your commitment to make this county one of
the greenest and most sustainable communities in the entire country.
###
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ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND
MEMORANDUM
July 15,2016
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SUBJECT:
FEIS for Bill 28-16, Solid Waste (Trash) - Strategic Plan to
Composting, Compost Use and Food Waste Diversion
Please find attached the fiscal and economic impact statements for the above­
referenced legislation.
JAH:mc
cc: Bonnie Kirkland, Assistant Chief Administrative Officer
Lisa Austin, Offices of the County Executive
Joy Nurmi, Special Assistant to the County Executive
Patrick Lacefield, Director, Public Information Office
Robert Hagedoorn, Acting Director, Department of Finance
Lisa Feldt, Director, Department ofEnvirorunental Protection
David Platt, Department of Finance
Matt Schaeffer, Office of Management and Budget
Naeem Mia, Office of Management and Budget
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Fiscal Impact Statement
Council Bill 28-16 - Strategic Plan to Advance Composting. Compost Use and Food Waste
Diversion
1.
Legislative Summary.
Bill 28-16 would require the Director ofthe Department of Environmental Protection
(DEP) to develop a strategic plan to advance compo sting. compost use and food waste
diversion and generally amend the County laws relating to Solid Waste (Trash).
2. An estimate of changes in County revenues and expenditures regardless of whether
the revenues or expenditures are assumed in the recommended or approved budget.
Includes source of information, assumptions, and methodologies used.
Bill 28-16 would not impact County revenues or expenditures. DEP will utilize existing
resources to create the strategic plan outlined in Bill 28-16.
3. Revenue and expenditure estimates covering at least the next 6 fIScal years.
See #2 above.
4.
An
actuarial analysis through the entire amortization period for each bill that would
affect retiree pension or group insurance costs.
Not Applicable.
5. An estimate of expenditures related to County's information technology (IT)
systems, including Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems.
Bill 28-16 would not impact expenditures relating to the County's ERP or IT systems.
6. Later actions that may affect future revenue and expenditures
if
the bill authorizes
future spending.
Not Applicable.
7.
An
estimate of the staff time needed to implement the bill.
Bill 28-16 would not add to the workplan of the Division of Solid Waste Services.
Employees currently working on food waste and composting issues will take on the
responsibilities outlined in Bil128-16 as a part of normal operations.
8. An explanation of how the addition of new staff responsibilities would affect other
duties.
Not Applicable.
@
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9. An estimate of costs when an additional appropriation is needed.
Bill 28-16 would not require additional appropriation.
10. A description of any variable that could affect revenue and cost estimates.
Not Applicable.
11. Ranges of revenue or expenditures that are uncertain or difficult to project.
Not Applicable.
12. If a bill is likely to have no fiscal impact, why that is the case.
Not Applicable.
13. Other fiscal impacts or comments.
None.
14. The following contributed to and concurred with this analysis:
Dan Locke, Department of Environmental Protection
Anthony Skinner, Department of Environmental Protection
Matt Schaeffer, Office of Management and Budget
@)
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Economic Impact Statement
Bill 28-16, Solid Waste (Trash) - Strategic Plan on Composting
Background:
This legislation would require the Director of the Department of Environmental
Protection (DEP) to develop a Strategic Plan to Advance Composting, Compost Use and
Food Waste Diversion (Plan) in the County by July 1,2017. The goal of the Plan is to
provide recommendations on legislative changes necessary to reduce food waste and
promote composting. The Plan would also identify potential new County policies and
initiatives to reduce food waste and promote and support composting throughout the
County. Bill 28-16 would require the Director ofDEP to submit an annual report.
1.
The sources of information, assumptions, and methodologies used.
Source of information include DEP. The Department of Finance did not use any
assumptions or methodologies in the preparation of the economic impact statement.
According to information provided by DEP and as stated in the Background section,
the goal of the legislation is to provide a strategic plan. As noted in the addition of
Section 48-17B (4) to the COlUlty Code, "giving food that would otherwise be wasted
to organizations that serve people in need is a means to reuse excess food'", this could
provide an economic benefit to low income families. However. without specific data
on the Plan's implementation of the reuse of food, the value of the economic benefit
is uncertain.
2. A description of any variable that could affect the economic impact estimates.
The variable that could affect the economic benefits to low income families is the
amount of food provided through the reuse of excess food.
3. The Bill's positive or negative effect, if any on employment, spending, savings,
investment, incomes, and property values in the County.
Bi1128-16
could have a modest positive economic impact on low income families as a
result of the implementation of the Plan as noted in paragraphs
1
and 2.
4.
If
a BiU is likely to have no economic impact, why is that the case?
Please see paragraph 3.
5. The following contributed to or concurred with this analysis: David Platt and
Mary Casciotti. Finance; Dan Locke DEP; and Matt Schaeffer, OMB.
Director
Page
I
of
I
/2
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Testimony on Behalf of County Executive Isiah Leggett on
Bill 28-16,
Solid Waste (Trash) - Strategic Plan to Advance Composting,
Compost
Use
and Food Waste Diversion
July 19,2016
Good afternoon President Floreen and Members of the County Council. I am
Eileen Kao, Chief of the Waste Reduction and Recycling Section in the Department of
Environmental Protection (DEP), and I am here to testify on behalf Qf County Executive Isiah
Leggett in support of Bill 28-16. This bill would amend the County Code to require DEP to
develop a strategic plan by July 1, 2017 to reduce excess food generation, reuse food that would
otherwise be wasted, and increase the amount of food waste that is composted.
Bill 28-16 would require DEP to include in the strategic plan legislative, policy,
metrics, and cost recommendations to reduce food waste and increase compo sting, developed
upon our assessment of numerous considerations, and in consultation with numerous stakeholder
organizations from both within and outside of County government. In addition, this Bill would
require that DEP submit a report annually each July 1, updating the food waste diversion metrics
that will be developed as a result of this bill, and documenting progress towards achievement of
the goals that will be established in the strategic plan.
Bill 28-16 is consistent with our ongoing efforts to reduce waste and recycle
more. Food waste represents a significant portion of the waste stream, and it is essential that we
reduce food waste and recycle more food in order to achieve the County's goal to reduce waste
and recycle 70% by 2020. DEP is currently pursuing long-term and large-scale food waste
recycling processing capacity. We are working to identify and secure cost effective options to
provide the County long-term access to a food waste composting facility able to accommodate
our growing needs for food waste recycling, and accept and process increasing tonnages of food
waste into compost. Our ongoing broader efforts, and the development and implementation of a
strategic plan to increase food waste diversion and composting are complimentary efforts.
The County Executive has concerns over two of the provisions in proposed Bill
28-16. One concern is the timing set forth for development of the strategic plan. The bill
proposes that DEP will develop the strategic plan by July 1,2017. Based upon the number of
organizations the Bill calls upon DEP to consult with, and the proposed areas to be evaluated, we
strongly believe this timeframe is not adequate, and that the due date should be revised to
January 1,2018.
The other concern relates to the requirement that the strategic plan include
consideration of the environmental impact of residential trash hauling by private haulers in
upcounty solid waste service districts. This provision does not have a place in Bill 28-16. We
do not believe this particular provision is appropriate to be included in the context of this bill.
We look forward to working with you on the important issue of food waste
compo sting, and increasing recycling to achieve our goal to reduce waste and recycle 70% by
2020. Thank you for the opportunity to testify.
@
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Testimony to the Montgomery County Council
Re: Concerning Bill 28-16, Solid Waste (Trash) - Strategic Plan on Composting
By: Aliza Fishbein, Non-Farmer Member, Montgomery County Agricultural Advisory Committee
Position: Support Bill 28-16
Good afternoon. Thank you for your time and consideration of Bill 28-16. My name is Aliza
Fishbein, I am a Non-Farmer Member of the Agricultural AdVisory Committee. The Committee is
made up of farmers and non-farmers from across Montgomery County, all who have an
understanding of the contributions and capacity of the agricultural community. Our members
represent a spectrum of ages and farm types and sizes. Some of our members are new to
farming and others are carrying on a tradition of farming that has run in their families for
generations, sometimes on the same plot of land that has been in their family for 150 years or
even more. We are stewards of our County's land; we know this very soil, and we live to work it
and protect it.
The Committee asked me to speak on their behalf today because I have spent the last year
writing my pubHc health masters thesis at Johns Hopkins University on the topic of food waste
composting in Montgomery County. I explored the strengths and opportunities of our current
food waste disposal system, the threats it poses on health and the environment and the
potential relief that food waste
composting
can provide.
I did extensive research, conducting literature reviews, gOing on site-visits, looking into
historical and legal records, and perhaps most importantly, recording hours upon hours of
stakeholder interviews. I discovered that most stakeholders recognize the benefits of food
waste composting and would like to partake in it, but that for most, the regulatory scheme in
the County makes it impossible.
Last year, the state of Maryland took an important step in encouraging composting on farms.
Farmers in Montgomery County appreciate that these new rules are a helpful step in the right
direction. But unfortunately, relying upon farms to carry the burden of food waste in the
County is simply not realistic.
First, there is just not enough space on the County's farms to hold the amount of compost we
would need to make an impact on the County's waste reduction goals.
Second, our farms are our livelihoods. We face many challenges in the agricultural industry,
including fluctuating and unpredictable weather. Asking farmers to take on the extra burden of
others' waste on the small scale currently permissible is not the strongest economic incentive.
Third, moving the waste all the way up-county from its source uses energy and brings more
truck traffic to rural roads.
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The Strategic Plan required by Bill 28-16 will involve a holistic assessment of opportunities for
expanding food waste composting in Montgomery County. It will present a pathway forward to
reaching our 70% recycling rate by 2020 goal.
We are grateful that the state of Maryland has begun to take small steps in the right direction,
by recognizing the importance of composting. Relying on farms alone is not the answer. We
would love to be part of a broader collaboration to address food waste disposal Tn our County.
We are grateful to Vice President Berliner for being the lead sponsor of this legislation and to
those councilmembers who have joined him as co-sponsors.
It's time for the County to take seriously the n-eed to dispose of its waste
in~ounty
in a
sustainable manner. Our recycling goal is admirable, yet lofty. Bill 28-16 offers a real way
forward to reach that goal and future goals.
I would like to submit into the record, a letter of support for Bill 28-16 from the Agricultural
AdVisory Committee.
Thank you.
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MONTGO:MERYCOUNTY
FOODCOUNClL
July 19, .2016
TESTIMONY IN SUPPORT OF BITL
~"I6:
Strategic Plan
to
Increase Composting
The Food Council is an independent nonprofit that serves as the central connection point for
stakeholders in the creation of a robust, sustainable local food system. We are named as a consulting
stakeholder in this bili. Our Food Recovery and Access Working Group advises the efforts of
Community Food Rescue to reduce food waste through food recovery and redistribution to food
insecure residents. Our Environmental Impact Working Group seeks to protect and improve the
environmental resources of our County related to agriculture and food, particularly soil and water,
and addresses the second and third tiers of food waste reduction through recovery and redistribution
for animal consumption. This group serves as a monthly convening of the non,profit and advocacy
organizations, businesses, farmers, and government agency partners committed to identifying new
opportunities for reducing food waste and increasing food waste composting capacity
in
Montgomery
County. We frequently engage with the Montgomery County Department of Environmental
Protection and regularly attend meetings of the Solid Waste Advisory Committee in collaborative
pursuit of our shared goal of increasing local, reliable composting infrastructure options.
In addition
t
the group recently partnered with a
JD
/MPH student to create a capstone report,
"Composting Food Waste: How to Expand Recycling in Montgomery County,» a white paper that
examines the current state of composting regulations in the County, the structure of government
agencies that supervise composting programs and services, and the history of how they came to be.
The Food Council was an active partner in the successful advocacy campaign achieving the
passage of Maryland SB.526, the Commercial Feed Exemption Bill, exempting donated food
products to be used for animal feed from registration regulations stipulated by the Maryland
Commercial Feed Law. These donations significantly reduce the food waste sent to incinerators
and landfills and is therefore an essential step in redirecting excess
food
away from the waste
stream. In the coming year, MCFC will work with existing regional partners advocate for the
exemption the food waste donated for compo sting as use as soil conditioner as regulated by the
Maryland Department of Agriculture regulations under the Fertilizer Law.
The Food Council and its Working Groups fully support this bill. Food waste diversion has
significant agricultural and environmental health benefits and expanding our capacity on a variety
(,
4825 Cordell Avenue, Suite 204
I
Bethesda, MD 20814
I
806.395.5593
mocofoodcouncil.org
I
mocofoodcouncil@gmai1.com
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of scales will strengthen our County's farms, small businesses,
non~profits,
and communities. We
consider food waste and food recovery as critical to meeting the County's
70
percent recycling
goal
by
20.20
and consistent with the County Climate Protection Plan's commitment to reducing
greenhouse gas emissions. Encouraging use of compost will become increasingly important to our
County residents, as well as our local sustainability initiatives, and aligns weU with the County's
RainScapes and .other green infrastructure initiatives
(all
ofwhich could use compost).
There are a wide range of potential options for food waste composting; efforts can be successful at
many scales spanning a variety of systems and methods. While it is essential to identify larger,scale
options, pursuing a wide range of food recovery options is equally important, especially given the
significant ability of
sma1ler~scale
efforts to begin operations relatively quickly, to cut private and
public sector solid waste management costs, help keep finished compost on local soils, and
decrease the environmental impacts of hauling.
To this end, we recommend that the County consider an infrastructure development strategy that
encompasses:
I.
Home
compo
sting
-
More residents could be composting at home. There are many
2.
jurisdictions with robust backyard composting programs that the County couId consider
for replication in order to enhance its current program, which now focuses on yard waste
and essentially discourages food waste composting. Cheverly (in Prince George's County)
is a good example. As a result of a backyard bin program,
400
of its
1,600
households are
now backyard composting approximately
100
tons a year, saving the Town about
$6,000
a
year,
$120,000
over
20
years. The town invested just under
$4,000
total, which is a notable
return on investment. Other participating Maryland municipalities are Bowie, Greenbelt,
Mount Rainier, Brentwood, Colmar Manor, Berwyn Heights, Boonsboro, and Snow Hill.
We believe a more robust home composting program that combines a training component
and a bin give,away or rebate program would cut County costs and reduce the tonnage of
food scraps it needs to process. Another viable option could be offering a simple retrofit
option for the Geobins, currently provided for free, to enhance rodent proofing.
Com.m.unit'J~Scale
com.posting
(such as at
K~12
Schools, community gardens, urban farms) ­
This is one of the fastest growing segments of the composring sector. New York City is an
example of a jurisdiction that considers
community~scale
composting integral to its
organics recycling strategy. That City supports
225
community~scale
composting sites in all
five of its Boroughs. Likewise, the DC Department of Parks and Recreation has a network
of
-30
community gardens that are composting in rat-resistant
3~bin
systems. These sites are
accepting food scraps from
off~site,
including from Compost Cab, a private hauler
collecting food scraps from residential and commercial clients. The Institute for Local
Self~Reliance~
is offers a Neighborhood Soil Rebuilders Composter Training Program to
specificall y train community leaders how to compost properly at the community scale in
partnership with local jurisdictions.
MCFC Written T
estimcny
af
Support;
Bi1l2B-ro
2
®
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3.
Qn..site
institutional
and commercial composting
(such as at detention centers, food banks,
schools/colleges) - On,site composting is a viable option for many food waste generators.
Frostburg University, for example, is successfully using a Rocket Composter to compost all
its dining hall food scraps. Our group is also evaluating the feasibility of composting food
scraps from the kitchen at the Correctional Facility at Boyds and the possibility of a
commercial composting site on the property.
4-
Qn..farm composting and other
smaJl,scale
composting
sites
-
The rollout of smaller facilities
would likely create more jobs than the development of a handful of centralized facilities. A
decentralized infrastructure will also reduce transportation costs, which are often the
largest cost of any waste handling system. Veteran Compost, for example, is looking for
one or more 3,acre sites to replicate its existing operation in Aberdeen. We had
-30
farmers
attend our December 4th forum focused on on,farm composting; there is high interest
among farmers in composting but they need support and training. We encourage the
County to consider developing a pilot demonstration project at a farm.
5.
Support existing and
potential
new
(Teen composting collection, processing, and
sales
businesses.
These businesses face significant challenges in maintaining profitability and expanding due
to a number of factors, including lack of access to land and capital (for example, grants or
green bank funding), unclear Zoning Ordinance definitions for approved food scrap
composting operational sites, and the burden of unnecessarily excessive regulations and
their associated costs.
Finally, we encourage the DEP to prioritize in the short,term an arrangement with Prince George's
County to secure access for Montgomery County food scraps at its Western Branch composting
site in Upper Marlboro. That site, while limited in capacity, is expanding the tonnage of food
scraps it can handle. There is a short window of opportunity now to negotiate capacity for tonnage
generated from our County. Securing specific tonnage capacity at the Western Branch site would
allow Montgomery County to pilot more food scrap collection and composting programs in the
short,term while continuing to explore other options. Although these arrangements are important
in the short term, it is essential that we also begin to identify sites where food scrap composting
facilities can be developed in our own county.
We commend the County leadership's commitment to addressing this food system issue and
thank the County Council and Executive for your support of our mission. We look forward to
working with our partners to develop a comprehensive strategy for creating a culture of
composting while significantly increasing food waste diversion capacity in Montgomery County.
Heather Bruskin
Manager, Montgomery County Food Council
MCFC \Vrirten
Testimony ofSu/J!xlrt:
Bm
28-r6
3
@
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Montgomery County Council:
Respected Councilmembers,
7/19/2016
I am Ryan Walter, a Montgomery County native and Walt Whitman Alumni. In 2011, my business partner,
Brian Flores (also a Whitman graduate), and I founded The Compost Crew, a Montgomery County based
small business that is committed to the effective and efficient management of our organic waste. Over the
past five years, we have collected more than 1 million pounds of organics and delivered them to be
composted. However, we are making investments to begin using our valuable feedstock to manufacture
several premium compost based products.
It is with this background that we are excited about the steps that the County is taking towards addressing
the issue of food waste with meaningful initiatives that may bring about real improvement. A mandate to
develop a plan for more properly and effectively managing our food waste issues is so vital to our
county's economic, environmental, and social sustainability.
Composting will create jobs. Not through the inefficient processing and transportation of the feed­
stock and products (those will be refined to be super-efficient to cut down on costs), but through the value
created from manufacturing valuable products. Products whose economic and environmental value
surpasses that of the energy and limited products created from an incineration or anaerobic digestion
process that additionally leaves sterile and even toxic bi-products.
NIMBY concerns are all predicated upon a poorly managed facility. When done properly, composting
facilities are sustainable and are boons to the local economy and environment, without the negative
aspects that come with disposal facilities sometimes wrongly associated with composting facilities.
On that note, I urge the County to ensure that there is infrastructure of a range of scales for composting
within the county and that we rely primarily on our own infrastructure to process our food scraps This will
allow for greater control of product, stability of operations, and direct economic benefit for our community.
Finally, I offer the Council, the DEP, and any other group involved in the development and execution of
the plan that The Compost Crew will be honored to be included in the discussion, to provide our insight
from experiences in working in Montgomery County on this problem for the last five years, as well as to
ensure that our strategy as a business is aligned with the County's goals and strategy.
Thank you very much for your time.
Ryan Walter
The Compost Crew, LLC - Co-Founder
Ryan@lthecompostcrew.com
I
(3D1) 801-7713
®
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July 19, 2016
To:
Montgomery County Council Members
From: Cheryl Kollin, Program Director, Community Food Rescue
RE: Bill 28-16 Testimony in Support of Strategic Plan to Advance
Composting, Compost Use and Food Waste Diversion in Montgomery
County
Dear members ofthe Montgomery County Council:
My name is Cheryl Kollin and I'm the Program Director of Community Food Rescue, a program
of Manna Food Center. As you know, thanks in part to County Council support, Community
Food Rescue plays an important role in preventing good food from going to waste. We
implement strategies that sit at the top tier of the EPA food recovery hierarchy by recovering
food from donors and distributing it to our county's residents who are experiencing food
insecurity. This is accomplished through a network of food assistance agencies powered by
volunteerfood runners. As of today, Community Food Rescue is a growing network of 99 food
donor businesses, 28 food assistance organizations, and 43 volunteer food runners. In 2015, our
food assistance organization members reported that they received 2.8 million Ibs. of food that
translates into 2.3 million meals. This also saved agencies from having to purchase $4.9 million
worth of food with their limited resources.
By establishing Community Food Rescue, the County Council already recognized the need to
channel unsold, surplus food for people, animals, and compost. Yet while we are making good
progress in diverting food to people, strategies for the other tiers are incomplete among food
assistance organizations. Manna, as the largest food recovery and distribution agency in the
county, is a good example. At its Gaithersburg warehouse, Manna sorts four million pounds of
food annually and the majority is shared with people. Despite relationships with farmers who
pick up food scraps for livestock, there are not enough farmers who can take the type of scraps
generated. Currently there is no economical or efficient way to share it given the scale of
Manna operations. Manna welcomes support in creating many more channels for getting food
scraps to livestock and compost. It would save Manna money now spent on waste disposal and
would contribute to a greener county.
We all know that food not fit for human consumption requires these other types of waste
diversion strategies. Community Food Rescue is pleased to support Bill 26-18 to address the
EPA's tiers of food for animals and food for composting. By strengthening the strategies,
infrastructure, and resources focused on these two tiers, this Bill will help the County achieve
its 70% recycling goal and reduce the apprOximately 140,000 tons offood waste it currently
generates annually.
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In mandating a strategic plan for food waste diversion, this Bill will address the sometimes
conflicting policies and barriers that prevent food waste diversion. We are excited
by
this Bill's
comprehensive approach to create waste diversion streams at diverse scales, at the household,
neighborhood, and county levels.
Cheryl Kollin
Program Director
Community Food Rescue
cheryl@communityfoodrescue.org
240.491.1958
www.communityfoodrescue.org
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Reference:
Bill 28-16,
Solid Waste (Trash) - Strategic Plan on Composting
Submitted by Douglas Alexander, President, NIE Institute, doug@niein.org
BackyardComposting.org and our experience with home composting.
Are vermin an issue?
The fIrst question the dozen municipalities we work with asked is:
Are their concerns
about vermin?
The Backyard Compo sting Project has provided around 2,000 compost
bins for residential homes. We have not experienced any vermin other
than
a crafty
raccoon that learned how to open the bin door. The simple solution was to
turn
the door
toward a tree. There have been no rats, mice, cockroaches or other pests in the bins.
Bacteria, fungi and earthworms do most of the work of composting. There will also be a
variety of other rotifIers in the bin that are part of the natural process of decaying that
produces compost. In the summer there may be small flying insects, which are also part
of this natural process.
Reasons why vermin are not an issue:
The EnviroWodd compost bins we provide offer screws that hold the bin firmly to the
ground to keep out pests. The bins also have a locking top and are heavy weight that
helps keeps them firmly on the ground. The bin is one solid piece with a door and top.
Food scraps decay and dehydrate quickly and thus don't provide much food content for
pests. Meat and
dairy
would be the primary draw for pest, which is why we ask residents
not to compost them.
To be extra safe residents can dig down a few inches so the compost bin bottom edge is
below ground level.
The EnviroWodd Compost Bin holds 11 cubic feet of food scraps
&
soiled paper waste.
A price of $31
per
bin plus shipping has been negotiated. Grant of $6 per bin is offered.
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Does compost stink?
The second questions asked is:
Will residents and the municipality have issues with
odor.
No! Ifresidents avoid compo sting meats, dairy
&
oil odor is unlikely. In fact
compost should have a pleasant odor like humus dug up in the woods. Mild odor may
occur if the compost pile is too wet causing anaerobic conditions. The simple solution is
to aerate the pile and mix in
dry
leaves with a fork or compost tooL
BackyardComposting.org provides a Composting Guide that covers all aspects of
compo sting (browns
&
greens, what to compost
&
what not to, etc.). We also provide a
40-minute training video for residents and an hour webinar for municipalities. These
resources help train residents to compost correctly to avoid any issues.
Why
should residents compost?
For residents, the biggest benefit to compo sting is that it helps them monitor and then
reduce their food waste, which is estimated at between $1,350
&
$2,275 per household
each year (Bloom, American Wasteland, page 187).
For $20, our recommended resident purchase price for the bin, and a modest effort,
households can save thousands of dollars by modifying their food purchases to reduce
waste.
This provides an economic boost for their household as well as the local economy since
they have more money to spend on other products or services.
Municipalities participating in the Backyard Composting Program include:
Cities of Bowie, Greenbelt, Mount Rainier
&
Brunswick - Towns of Cheverly, Berwyn
Heights, Brentwood, Colmar Manor, Boonsboro, Middletown
&
Snow Hill
The City of Frederick is expected to start next month.
$16 per bin is the yearly savings in tipping fees. This estimated is based on 500 pounds
(1/4 ton) of food scraps
&
soiled paper waste per year with a $64 per ton avg. tipping fee.
With 2,000 bins placed the total yearly savings are
$32~00-0
and $320,000 in savings over
the minimum 10-year warranty life of the bins
~ins
can
last
up to 20-years).
Composting produces a remarkable substance that:
­
• Composting is a stormwater BMP. Even a small 6 x 6 foot plot amended with only 25
pounds of compost will hold an additiona1100 gallons of water, as much as two 50 gallon
rain barrels. Each household that composts produces 50 pounds of compost per year on
average.
(Source: www.dmww.com/upL.documentsilibnu)./reduce-your-water-use-with-compostpdO
• Sequesters carbon in the soil and holds nutrients-in the root zone available for plants to
use.
It
provides low, steady, balanced nutrition to plants. ­
• Enhances soil structure and quality. Clay soils: impn;>ved.drainage and aeration.
Sandy soils: improved water
&
nutrient retention. Also s!lPpresses plant diseases.
• Raises the pH of acid soils and lowers the pH of alkaline soils.
It
helps keep soil pH in
an optimum range for plants to use the available nutrients. ." .­
• Compost in not a fertilizer, it is an ecosystem.
It
seeds the soil with billions of diverse
life forms that work together to make soil function and help plant roots absorb nutrients.
@
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I~SR
www.ilsr.org
INSTITUTE FOR
Local Self-Reliance
1710 Connecticut Ave. NW #400
I
Washington, DC
20009
202.898.1610
Montgomery County (MD) County Council Public Hearing on
Bill 28-16, Solid Waste (Trash) ­
Strategic Plan to Advance Composting, Compost Use and Food Diversion
Position: Support
July 19
th
,
2016
Testimony by Brenda Platt, Co-Director, Institute for Local Self-Reliance, bplatt@ilsr.org
My name is Brenda Platt and I am the co-director ofthe Institute for Local Self-Reliance, a nonprofit
research and technical assistance organization, where I have worked on solid waste issues for 30 years.
head up our MD Composting Makes SenSe Project, which is advancing composting in the state as a key
strategy to create jobs, enhance soils, protect the climate and regional watersheds, and reduce waste. I
participated for two years on the MD Statewide Compost Work Group through which I supported the
development of new statewide regs to permit composting sites and helped establish the state's 90%
yard and food waste recovery goal by 2040. I am also on the steering committee ofthe MD-DC Compost
Council, and have been licensed twice in Maryland to operate commercial scale composting facilities. In
2014, ILSR launched a replicable Neighborhood Soil Rebuilders com poster train-the-trainer program in
the DC metro region to train community leaders in the practice and science of small-scale composting
(flyer attached). We are at the forefront of cultivating community composting and have hosted three
national forums on the subject (agenda from January event attached). I've authored several reports on
composting including:
Pay Dirt: Composting in Maryland
to
Reduce Waste, Create Jobs, and Protect the
Bay; The State of Composting in the U.S.;
and
Growing Local Fertility: A Guide
to
Community
Composting.
This past May I released a series of posters on composting's benefits to reduce trash,
enhance soils, create jobs, and protect the climate. (Smaller versions are appended to this testimony.) I
also co-lead the Young Activist Club of Takoma Park, which worked to get styrofoam lunch trays out of
Montgomery County public schools and supported the County's styrofoam ban. (Thank you!) The Club
has been trying to start a small pilot school composting project but evidently "composting is not an
approved" activity at
MCPS.
The Institute for Local Self-Reliance urges a favorable report on Bill 28-16.
Montgomery County has an excellent yard waste collection and composting program. Food waste
reduction and recovery is the next holy grail. At least 198 communities in the U.S. now have curbside
collection of food scraps, representing 2.74 million households spread out over 19 states. The biggest
obstacle to such a program in Montgomery County is lack of facilities and infrastructure. One benefit of
. composting is that it can be small scale and large-scale and everything in between. In addition to
considering one or more commercial-scale sites, we could be composting at schools. We could be
composting more in backyards. We could be composting in community gardens and urban farms. We
could be supporting farmers to compost. The DC Department of Parks and Recreation has a network of
-30 community gardens that are composting in rat-resistant 3-bin systems. Community-scale
composting is one of the fastest growing parts of the composting industry.
Yet, local policy and strategy rarely supports a diverse and distributed infrastructure. This bill addresses
this. It is critical for establishing the framework for a comprehensive strategy that considers food rescue,
home composting, on-site composting, community-scale composting, on-farm composting, local use of
compost to support soil health and the County's stormwater management program, and more.
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I offer the additional following reasons to
support this bill:
1.
Composting Is Essential to. Reach
Higher Recycling Levels in
Maryland: My 2013 report,
Pay
Dirt,
found that there is an
enormous opportunity to achieve
higher recycling levels in Maryland
with comprehensive composting.
There's plenty of room to recover
more leaves and yard"trimmings,
and most food scraps in the state
are landfilled or burned. Almost half
the garbage we set out at the curb is
readily biodegradable in composting
or anaerobic digestion facilities.
2. Composting and Compost Use Will
Create In-State Businesses and
Jobs:
Pay Dirt
found that for every 1 million tons of yard waste and food waste diverted to
composting, with the resulting compost used within the state, 1,400 new jo.bs could be
sustained. SsmaJler facilities (under 5,000 tons per year) had a higher job-to-ton ratio than their
medium sized (between 5,000 and 20,000 tons peryear) and large sized (greater than 20,000·
tons per year) counterparts. This indicates that the rollout of smaller facilities will create more
jobs than the development of a handful of centralized facilities. A decentralized infrastructure
will also reduce transportation costs, which are often the largest cost of any waste handling
system.
3. Maryland Has Insufficient Capacity to Recycle Food Scraps: More capacity is needed within
Maryland to handle materials, particularly food scraps. The closing of the Peninsula composting
facility in Wilmington, Delaware, underscores the need for MD-based operations. This bill is
designed to encourage development of a diverse and distributed infrastructure that engages the
community and encourages local use of the final product to build healthy soil within the County.
4.
Policies Are Needed to Expand Composting and Compost Use In Maryland: Local policies are
needed to overcome lack of infrastructure and other obstacles to compost expansion. MOE's
newly promulgated - summer 2015 - permitting regulations for compost sites establish a clear
regulatory path. This bill focuses on one next logical steps: encouraging a wide range of capacity
and a review of models in place elsewhere.
5. Development of Food Waste CQmposting Sites Are Critical For Successful Implementation of
the County's Styrofoam Ban: The County's styrofoam ban encourages the use of compostable
foodware. Infrastructure that can handle both food scraps and compostable ware is needed.
I look forward to working with county agencies and stakeholders on implementing the goals of the bill.
Thank you.
About the Institute for Local Self-Reliance (lLSR): ILSR is a national nonprofit organization headquartered in Washington, DC.
Since 1974 we have provided research and technical assistance on waste reduction, renewable energy, and other resource
conservation issues to business, government, and citizens groups. We have worked in Maryland for decades to promote
recycling-based businesses and jobs and prioritize waste reduction, reuse, and recycling over trash incineration and landfill
disposal. .
2
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I
Testimony on
Bill 28-16, Solid Waste (Trash) - Strategic Plan on Composting and Compost Use
July 19, 2016
\"
My name is Susan Eisendrath and I live at 9 Manorvale Court, Rockville, 20853 and I compost and
use compost for my 3,000 square foot organic vegetable garden. I'm also a Master Gardener and I
help with composting at the Derwood Demonstration Garden and I'm a Master Composter and I teach
backyard composting.
I fully support this bill and my hope is that it will help create a culture of composting and compost use.
Over the past 20 years, I've used a lot of methods, composting a variety of materials, including food
scraps. Also, for the past
4
years I've coordinated with the Division of Solid Waste to ensure they
distribute county compost containers, called GEO bins, at Master Gardener events. At these events, .
we demonstrate and provide advice on how to compost. My experience is that residents who receive
the GEO bins are very motivated "composters" and they are eager to learn how to do it "right."
Most of the residents who want to start composting, want to compost food scraps. And often the
people who are already composting, when I inquire about the material they compost, they say they
are composting food scraps. As a Master Gardener, I let them know that accord ing to what I have
found in the County code, and I quote,
"The use
of
compost piles for the disposal
of
garbage is
permitted only when the pile is completely rodentproofed. Compost piles consisting entirely
of
leaves
and dirt do not require rodentproofing."
And according to the Code, garbage is defined as, quote:
"All
organic waste materials resulting from the preparation, cooking, handling
or
storage
of
food."
And just
to clarify,
"Rodentproofing"
is not defined in the Code.
As I understand it, at one point, the county allowed for the composting of food scraps and when there
were complaints about odors and rodents, residents were discouraged from composting food scraps.
It's important to prevent these problems and that's why there are best practice management methods
to ensure that compost is being produced effectively and safely. These best practices are
scientifically based, are easy, and they are being used in backyard settings, in community composting
programs, and in large scale facilities. The "Composting Is Easy" summary fact sheet is attached, for
additional information on composting and compost use.
Knowing how to manage the basic elements of composting can help prevent problems.
Here are the basics:
First of all, microbes, fungi, worms, and insects are the primary critters that do the composting work.
Humans just "manage" the process.
Compost Critters need Food:
And the best recipe of food for the microbes and fungi is a
3
to
1
ratio of browns to greens or 3 buckets of leaves, which are carbons, to 1 bucket of green garden
waste, which is nitrogen. Having too much greens can cause odors, so if that happens, more browns
or leaves should be added.
1
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The next ingredients the critters need are Water and Air:
Compost should be as moist as a damp
sponge and if it's too wet, it can create odors, so the way to prevent this, is to add more dry leaves
and turn or mix the compost to provide air. Leaving some sticks or wood chips in the compost will
also allow for air and water pockets.
The Size of Pile and Temperatures are both important for hot composting:
Some microbes like it
hot, over 132 degrees, and to get compost to heat up, the 3 to
1
ratio recipe is important, and the size
of the pile or container needs to be at least a 3'x3'x3'. Hot composting can also deter rodents.
Container/Bins, IJsing Biofilters and Pre-decomposing are the last elements:
Rodents can be
prevented from entering compost by using enclosed containers such as a bin that's constructed using
hardware cloth to cover any openings or by purchasing and using containers like the EnviroWorld
Compost Bin.
Other effective methods include placing a 4-6 inch layer of leaves around the compost to act as a
"biofilter" to prevent any possible odors. Food scraps can also be stockpiled and "pre-decomposed" in
a 5 gallon bucketor trash can, by layering in food scraps and leaves, and then this organic material
can be added to the compost, placing it in- the center, with a biofilter around it. Lastly, when
composting food scraps, it's important to make sure to leave out meat, fish, dairy, oils and fats as
they decompose more slowly, tend to give off more odors, and they can be more attractive to rodents.
While most of the material we compost at Derwood is garden waste, this year we experimented with
cornposting food scraps. We compared the composting temperatures and compost quality using an
open bin system, the GEO bin container and the EarthSaver container. While we are still analyzing
the data, preliminary results indicate that the compost with food scrap material, composted at higher
temperatures and produced a higher quality product using all the methods.
I encourage the county to expand the already good foundation they have, by providing residents with
the edu<;;ation and training to compost food scraps. There are many resources, models and strategies
that the county can use to design programs that promote composting in an effective and safe manner,
and below is a list of a sampling of these resources. Once passed, I look forward to working with the
county to help create the Strategic Plan and to implement the programs, providing diversified
composting options to county residents and promoting compost use. Thank you for your time and
attention.
Resources for Composting and Compost Use:
http://compost.css.comell.edu/
https:llilsr.org/com posti ng-best-practicesl
http://www.cbsm.com/pages/guide/preface/
2
@)
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~Iontgomery
County Group
July 19, 2016
Testimony on
Bill
28-16, Solid Waste (Trash) - Strategic Plan on Composting and Compost Use
Good afternoon. My name is Brian Ditzler and I am testifying on behalf of Sierra Club
Montgomery and its more than 5,000 members in this County. I am also a dedicated
backyard com poster.
We applaud the Food Council, Councilmember Berliner and the Department of
Environmental Protection for working on the creation of this bill. For the past 8 years,
Sierra Club Montgomery has been actively advocating for programs that promote
sustainability through the County Climate Protection Plan; this bill is a critical part of the
County's commitment to reducing our carbon footprint and fighting climate change.
Recycling and composting both involve the recovery of substantive value from materials
now discarded in municipal solid waste.
While we support this Bill because, as others have noted, there are many benefits to
composting food scraps and using compost, we are particularly interested in the impact
that it can have on reducing County waste.
As we understand it, a significant portion of the County's waste is currently incinerated
both to dispose of the waste and to generate energy. Even with the best emissions
capture technology available today, burning trash results in the release of pollutants that
can contribute to respiratory illnesses, birth defects, damage to the immune system,
cancer and more. Composting the County's food scraps would reduce the amount of
material burned, which could improve the air quality of our region. It's also important to
recognize that food scraps are an inefficient source of energy for the incinerator, due to
their low calorific value and high moisture content.
We are also pleased that this bill not only addresses the need to establish a large scale
municipal food scrap composting system, it also calls for a more robust backyard
composting program, community composting, as well as support for developing on-farm
composting. The County already has a good foundation for expanding the backyard
composting program to include composting food scraps. We encourage DEP to offer
additional training to residents that includes best practices for composting and, if
necessary, to provide residents with compost containers appropriate for food scrap
composting.
Finally, we like that the bill calls for DEP to include the use of compost for a number of
purposes. DEP already recommends adding compost to soils for RainScapes projects,
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2
and there is potential for increasing the use of compost for other County programs.
MCDOT and the Parks Department could use compost in erosion control and
landscaping, and compost sold commercially could be used in similar ways.
In closing, we want to emphasize that this bill provides the County with a huge
opportunity to be a leader in this region by planning and implementing a comprehensive
food scrap composting program. We urge the County Council to pass this bill and to
support the efforts of DEP to create a diversified composting system. The Sierra Club
looks forward to working with the County in the future on this plan and the resulting
programs.
Brian Ditzler
Sierra Club Montgomery Executive Committee
Sierra Club Maryland Co-Chair
brian. ditzler@mdsierra.org
301 565-0870
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Testimony to Montgomery County Council- for Hearing July
21, 2016
On Bill
28-16
Solid Waste (Trash) - Strategic Plan to Advance Composting,
Compost Use and Food Waste Diversion
By
Kit Gage, President, Friends ofSligo Creek
Friends of Sligo Creek (FOSC) supports this important bill. We agree that the effort to remove
70% of the waste stream from landfill is very important, and targeting the removal of food
waste is (sorry) the low hanging fruit to achieve this goal. As one of the pinch 'points is a
market for the composted material, it is critical to link the product with a good use.
We completely agree that composted food waste applied to turf is a lovely solution. One of
the most difficult dual pieces of this effort is making turf more absorptive and at the same
time reducing use of pesticides and inorganic fertilizers to turf. This bill, facilitating use of
composted food waste, can help address both sides of this need. Composted turf improves
soil health and fertilizes it, reducing or eliminating the need (or perceived need) for inorganic
fertilizers and pesticides.
FOSC long has supported relatively cheap, simple and replicable stormwater mitigation efforts
to facilitate the MS4 requirements. Compost is recommended for DEP's RainScapes projects
because it absorbs more water than soil and as a soil amendment, it improves the health of
plants. Also if the County produces food waste based compost locally, they could have
another and very rich and complimentary (to composted leaves) soil amendment source for
their green infrastructure projects, to help meet the MS4 permit.
Friends of Sligo Creek understands this problem from the effects on the park and particularly
on Sligo Creek. Because there is so much impervious surface in the county, and what is not
impervious is hard surface turf that doesn't function well to absorb rainwater, we see the
effects in the creek of flooding during storms, and drought in between. Fu rther the
misapplication of inorganic fertilizers and overuse of pesticides is greatly damaging to water
quality and survival of aquatic life. If this bill is well implemented, it will help turn people
toward a healthier turf that supports more wildlife in itself, and absorbs stormWater better.
And then the effect downstream will be a healthier creek and watershed in general.
Application of compost to turf is well documented in the literature (and in my personal
experience) as greatly improving the tilth of the soil, and the absorption by turf of storm water.
If the county sets up or contracts for effective food waste composting, and makes it eaSily
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available. the result will be a huge win for the county in its many faceted effort to improve the
environment.
Kit Gage has been president of Friends of Sligo Creek since April 2014. She has been active
with the FOSC Stormwater Committee since 2005. She became a Master Watershed Steward
thru the Anne Arundel County program and then helped co-found and co-direct the National
Capital Region Watershed Stewards Academy. She received a Horticulture Certificate from the
Graduate School USA, and was honored at the H20 Summit this spring.
Kit Gage
president@fosc.org
PO Box 11572
Takoma Park MD 20913
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TESTIMONY OF PAUL TUKEY
of
GLENSTONE
to
MONTGOMERY COUNTY COUNCIL, 7/19/16
At the Glenstone Museum in Potomac, where I have served as the Chief Sustainability Officer for the
past several years, we have been trying to meet this County's 2020 goal of 70 percent recycling of
office materials since 2013. In July ofthat year we commenced weighed measurements of Mixed
Paper, Co-Mingled Materials and Trash
and found that about the best we could
achieve was 55 or 60 percent
recycling, even in a highly monitored,
trained and motivated environment.
By the end of 2013 we purchased two
small composting bins for our leftover
food scraps. Due to the popularity of the
program, the composting operation soon
shifted to a tennis court that was no
longer in use. By the fall of 2014 our
grounds crew was applying the first
"finished" compost to our landscape,
which has gained notoriety in the County
and beyond for its ali-organic approach to maintenance. These exemplary results would not be
possible without the inclusion of compost.
,
Our most recent data now shows an average recycling rate of 83 percent of our office
materials. This rate would be approximately 25 points less if we did not include the
composting of our leftover food, and also ofthe compostable food service materials - plates, cups,
napkins, forks etc. - that are now mandatory at Glenstone.
As a part ofthe significant facilities expansion
(above) currently ongoing at Glenstone, which
will include new art galleries and a farm-to-table
cafe, we are also building an Environmental
Center where the public can come to learn about
Glenstone's numerous environmental initiatives.
Front and center, of course, will be a composting
facility.
On a personal note, I've been a lifelong user of
the black gold known as compost since the
1960s at my grandparents' dairy farm in Maine. In those days it would have been unthinkable to not
bring any leftover food to the compost pile; "waste not, want not" was a central theme to my
grandparents' way of life.
As an adult who has endlessly studied the earth and its natural systems, I've come to this conclusion
and made this statement broadly as I've lectured around the world: "The conscious creation of
compost is mankind's single greatest gift to the planet." So much of what we do as humans
depletes the earth's resources; creating compost actually gives something valuable back Virtually
anything that used to be alive, either derived from plants or animals, can be utilized to enhance life
again in the form of compost. We can,
and must,
do everything possible to encourage composting in
its myriad forms. Compost's positive impact on plant and soil health, and especially water retention,
is nothing short of profound.
Please consider Glenstone and myself a resource in this endeavor you're considering today.
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----------------------------------------------------------------------
~
SugarloafCitizens)
Association
Protecting Our Rural Legacy
Linden Farm, 20900 Martinsburg Rd., PO Box 218, Dickerson, MD 20842
www.SugarloafCitizens.org
• Tel. 301-349-4889
Good Afternoon. My name is Anne Sturm and I am testifying on behalf of the Sugarloaf
Citizens Association (Sugarloaf). Sugarloaf is a volunteer organization that has an over 40-year
history of work to preserve the agricultural tradition and environmental health in upper
Montgomery County.
With that mission in mind, I am here today to register our support for Bill 28-16. As some of
you might remember, Sugarloaf was one of the earliest advocates for recycling in our county
and our support for the environment and conservation continues. A strategic plan with the
goal of expanding composting as well as reducing food waste in Montgomery County is
laudable. As an organization representing residents in the Agricultural Reserve, we would like
to stress the importance of locating composting facilities in a de-centralized way throughout
the county. Currently Dickerson -an Ag Reserve community-houses the yard waste
composting facility, incinerator, ash-fill and power plant. It is unfair to burden one community
with the county's large-scale facilities. Furthermore, on-farm composting can benefit farmers
as well as the county overall-as long as it does not place undue burdens on roads, the sole
source aquifer, and nearby residents. They are stakeholders, as well.
Thank you for your time and service to our county.
Sincerely,
Anne Sturm
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MONTGOMERY COUNTY MARYLAND
SOLID WASTE ADVISORY COMMIITEE
July 14,2016
The Honorable Isiah Leggett
County Executive of Montgomery County Maryland
Executive Office Building
101 Monroe Street, 2nd Floor
Rockville, MD 20850
County Council of Montgomery County Maryland
President, The Honorable Nancy Floreen, At-Large
Vice President, The Honorable Roger Berliner, District 1
The Honorable Marc EIrich, At-Large
The Honorable Tom Hucker, District 5
The Honorable Sidney Katz, District 3
The Honorable George Leventhal, At-Large
The Honorable Nancy Navaro, District
4
The Honorable Craig Rice, District 2
The Honorable Hans Riemer, At-Large
Council Office Building
100 Maryland Avenue, 5
th
Floor
Rockville, MD 20850
SUBJECT:
Bill No. 28-16
Solid Waste (Trash)
Strategic Plan on Compo sting
The Solid Waste Advisory Committee (SWAC) enthusiastically endorses and supports
Bill No.
28-16;
AN
ACT to:
(1)
Require the Executive to propose and implement a Strategic Plan to Advance
Composting, Compost Use and Food Waste Diversion in Montgomery County
(2)
Generally amend County laws related to Solid Waste (Trash).
The SWAC is composed of 15 members of the community representing citizens, businesses, and
the solid waste industry whose mission is to advise the county council and the county executive
on all matters relating to solid waste management within the county.
SWAC believes this bill is
an
important step in moving the County to its goal of 70% recycling
by 2020.
C
7~
cLQ
AJ
----....-­
Paula Jenson
Chair, SWAC
(
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MONTGOMERY COUNTY PLANNING BOARD
THE MARYLAND·NATIONAL CAPITAL PARK AND PLANNfNG COMMISSION
OFFICE
OF
THE
SOI.\~~"
July 18,2016
:r
o
CHAIR
The Honorable Nancy Floreen
President, Montgomery County Council
Council Office Building
100 Maryland Avenue
Rockville, Maryland 20850
SUBJECT:
~:
Bill No. 28-16
Solid Waste (Trash)
. Strategic Plan to Advance Compo sting, Compost Use and Food Waste Diversion
The Montgomery County Planning Department and Department of Parks support Bill 28-16. By
taking organic materials out of the County's waste stream, compo sting is not only an important
step towards realizing the County's goal of70% recycling by 2020, but the associated reductions
in C02 emissions at the County's Waste Recovery Facility will also further advance the goals of
the County's Climate Protection Plan. By producing a valuable soil enhancer for agricultural,
landscaping, gardening and other uses, composting also provides many other environmental and
economic benefits.
In addition to the benefits noted in Bill 28-16, healthier soils through compost amendments can
be an important factor in improving and protecting our water and air quality:
• Less runoff will decrease soil erosion and deliver fewer pollutants to our surface waters.
• Compost releases nutrients slowly-over months and years, unlike chemical fertilizers.
This also results in reduced pollutant inputs to both groundwater and surface water.
• Reducing the need for chemical fertilizers will reduce the greenhouse gas emissions
(N20) that are associated with their use.
• Compost additions increase the ability ofsoil to capture and store atmospheric carbon.
These benefits, too, will support efforts to meet the goals of the County's Climate Protection
Plan, as well as the water quality requirements of its MS4 Pennit, the "green" practices goals and
objectives of the Department of Park's Vision 2030 Strategic Plan and Parks, Recreation and
Open Space (PROS) Plan, and the environmental goals, objectives, and strategies of the General
Plan.
8787 Georgia Avenue, Silver Spciog, Maryland 20910 Phone:: 301.495.4605 F:uc: 301.495.1320
www.montgomeryplanningboatd.org E-Mail: mcp-cbair@mncppc-mc.org
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The Honorable Nancy Floreen
July 18, 2016
Page Two
As Bill 28-16 indicates, interagency coordination and input will be important in creating a
successful strategic compostiilg plan, and the Planning Department and the Department of Parks
look forward to participating in its development.
Sincerely,
~
Chair
cc:
Montgomery County Planning Board
Gwen Wright
Rose Krasnow
Lisa Feldt
Mike Riley
John Nissel
Mitra Pedoeem
Pamela Dunn
Mark Symborski
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·~
,"
".'~'
.. : : ,'.
. >
MONTGOMERY COUNTY PLANNING BOARD
THE MARYLAND-NATIONAL CAPITAL PARK AND PLANNING COMMISSION
OFFICE OF THE CHAIR
July 27,2016
The Honorable Nancy Floreen
President, Montgomery County Council
Council Office Building
100 Maryland Avenue
Rockville, Maryland 20850
SUBJECT: Bill No. 28-16
Solid Waste (Trash)
Strategic Plan to Advance Composting, Compost Use and Food Waste Diversion
This letter is a follow-up to my previous letter regarding the referenced Bill, dated July 18,
2016, to provide additional input prior to the upcoming Transportation, Infrastructure, Energy,
and Environment Committee worksession. Although the Commission continues to support
Bill 28-16, the Department of Parks
has
since noted that the State nutrient management laws
. are not entirely in line with this Bill's intent to increase the use of compost while reducing
synthetic or "chemical" fertilizer inputs. Compost of any composition contains phosphorus,
and thus would be prohibited under current law from use on soil or
turf
that did not have a soil
test indicating the need for phosphorus. This would preclude top dressing athletic fields even .
when over-seeding, and would also not allow compost tea applications, both of which are
integral in organic or reduced-chemical turf management programs. As a result, the current
nutrient management laws and regulations might conflict with the intent of Bill 28-16, and
have potential unintended negative consequences regarding organic
turf
management.
The Planning Department and Department of Parks also agree with the
7/19
Public Hearing
testimony of Eileen Kao (speaking on behalf of the County Executive and DEP Director Lisa
Feldt) requesting an extension of the deadline for delivery of the strategic plan from July I,
2017 to January 2018, to allow adequate time.for research and for meeting with all the groups
identified as interested parties.
As Bill 28-16 indicates, interagency coordination and input will
be
important in creating a
successful strategic composting plan, and the Planning Department and the Department of
Parks look forward to participating in its development.
Sincerely,
Chai
~n
8787 GeotgiB Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910 Phone:
301.495.4605
Fax: 301.495.1320
www.montgomeryplanningboarc!.org E-Mail: mcp-chait@mncppc-mc.org
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July 12th, 2016
Montgomery County Council
Council Office Building
100 Maryland Avenue, 6th Floor
Rockville, MD 20850
Re: Bill 28-16, Solid Waste (Trash) - Strategic Plan on Composting
Dear Council Vice President Berliner and members of the Montgomery County
Council:
My name is Jane Thery and I am the Founder and Chair of the Maryland
Horse Council's Farm Stewardship Committee. The Maryland Horse Council (MHC) is
a membership-based, umbrella trade association ofthe entire horse industry in
MARYLAND HORSE COUNCil
p.0,
BOX 141
DAMASCUS, MD
20872
Maryland. Our membership includes horse farms, horse related businesses,
individual enthUSiasts, and breed, interest and discipline associations. As such, we
represent over 30,000 Marylanders who make their living with horses, or just own
and love them. Montgomery County is home to one of the highest proportions of
our statewide membership.
The Farm Stewardship Committee was established in 2011 to assist horse
farm owners and managers to reach their land stewardship goals by providing user­
friendly information, community support, and access to information on financing
and other incentives. The Committee also works to gain recognition for Maryland's
horse farms as excellent stewards of about one-quarter (approx. 587,000 acres) of
all agricultural land in the state. Much of that equine-dedicated land is in pasture
and forest, both of which help reduce run-off to streams and rivers and provide
wildlife habitat. We are dedicated to bringing the voice of the horse community into
discussions of laws, regulations and incentive programs for agriculture and for the
environment.
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MHC has been actively pursuing ways to increase the available facilities and
opportunities for composting horse manure. For the past several years MHC has
been conducting a careful study of options. After a state-wide survey on the use of
the approximately 55 pounds of manure each of our horses produce every day, I and
MHC are dedicated to promoting modern composting and its use for on-farm and
commercial organic soil enhancement. An important partner in these efforts has
been the Soil Conservation Districts Equine Specialists. We have also been in contact
with organizations promoting food composting and believe there is ample
opportunity for cooperation and coordination with this community. We have noted,
in particular, that the absence of a broad, wholistic, and regional approach, and the
lack of regional infra-structure, have been significant hindrances to the development
of effective and efficient solutions for the re-use of important organic resources.
Composted horse manure is a valuable and as yet under-utilized resource.
According to a 2010 equine census,
*
Maryland is home to 79,100 equine animals
housed at 16,000 locations with 188,000 acres devoted strictly to horses.
Montgomery County is one oftwo Maryland counties with the largest number of
MARYLAND HORSE COUNCIL
horses. According to the 2010 Census, there are about 8,000 horses in Montgomery,
with over 15,000 acres related to equine use.
*
Many members of the Montgomery
County horse community are leaders in quality com posting and pasture
management.
As noted above, the average horse excretes 55 pounds of waste per day,
**
Therefore, using the 2010 census numbers, Montgomery County horses produce
approximately 160,600,000 pounds of manure per year. While many farms are able
to compost this material and use it as fertilizer and soil amendment on-farm, many
others do not have that capacity and are forced to have that material disposed of
off-farm, often at great expense to the farmers. And some of this material may end
up in landfills. (A 2015 MHC survey of Maryland horse farmers revealed that 34% of
respondents reported that they sent un-composted manure off the farm for
disposal. 50% of respondents who had their horse manure hauled away were not
aware of the ultimate disposition.)
Horse manure is a good substrate to use for compost. First, it's drier than
other livestock manure, therefore it's easier to transport from one location to
p.o.
BOX 141
DAMASCUS, MD 20872
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another. Second, it has a 5:1:2 ratio of nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium,
**
and
thus is relatively balanced in nutrients when it's applied as a soil amendment. Third,
when the compostable manure includes animal bedding products such as sawdust
or wood shavings, or other vegetative materials such as food waste, it is close to an
ideal 25:1 carbon to nitrogen ratio. It is in the best interest not only of horse farm
owners, but of all Maryland citizens and of our environment to ensure that these
waste animal and plant products are recycled to their highest and best use.
MHC believes that Montgomery County Bill 28-16 will be an important step
in finding and developing composting opportunities, and increasing the number of
composting facilities, which, in turn, potentially will increase the opportunities for
composting horse manure. In those facilities where it is practiced, it has been shown
that food waste when composted with horse manure results in an excellent
compost/soil amendment. Given the large quantity of un-composted Montgomery
County manure and food waste currently being disposed of, exploring ways in which
food waste and horse manure can be composted, either jointly or in related
facilities, is an indisputable win-win for the County from both an economic and
MARYLAND HORSE COUNCIL
P.O,BOX 141
DAMASCUS, MD 20872
environmental standpoint.
Therefore, in consideration of the bill's legislative finding that­
"increasing the amount of food and
other compostable waste
that is
composted will help the County meet its goal of recycling 70% of the solid waste
stream generated in the County." (sec. 1(a)(8) [emphasis added];
and given that the bill requires the Strategic Plan to consider­
"diversion and composting of non-food waste compostables," (sec. 1(c)(9);
we respectfully request that The Maryland Horse Council and its Farm Stewardship
Committee, and the Montgomery County Soil Conservation District Equine
Specialist's Office be added to the list of stakeholders in Bill 28-16, Solid Waste
(Trash) - Strategic Plan on Composting. (sec. l(d).
Thank you very much for the opportunity to address your Council through
this written testimony. I would be glad to answer any questions regarding this
request.
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With respect,
Chair and Founder
Maryland Horse Council Farm Stewardship Committee
*
MASS (Marvland Agricultural Statistics Service). 2002. Maryland Equine: Results of
the 2002 Maryland Equine Census. Annapolis. MD: Maryland Department of
Agriculture.
**
Lawrence,
L.,
J.R. Bicudo, and E. Wheeler. 2003. Horse manure characteristics
literature and database review. In Proc. International Anim .• Ag. Food Processing
Wastes Symp .. Research Triangle Park, NC, Oct. 12-15 .. 277-284. St. Joseph, MI: Am.
Soc. Ag. and BioI. Engineers.
MARYLAND HORSE COUNCIL
P.O. BOX 141
DAMASCUS, MD 20872
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City
of Rockville
111 Maryland Avenue
Rockvill~.
August
2,2016
Maryland
20850·2364­
www.rockvillemd.gov
240·314·5000
TTY
UQ·3J.1·8137
TIle Honorable Roger Berliner, Vice President
Montgomery County Council
Stella Werner Council Office Building
100 Maryland Avenue, 5<h Floor
Rod.-ville, Maryland 20850
Re: Rockville Comments on Bill 28-16, Solid Waste (Trash) - Strategic Plan to Advance
Composting, Compost Use, and Food Waste Diversion
Dear Councilmember Berliner:
TIle Mayor and Council commends rou for leading Montgomery County's efforts to implement
a composting program and for your introduction of Bill 28-16 to create a strategic composting
plan. The City ofRocb-ille agrees 'with the County's conclusion that cornposting is good for
our water, soil and
air
"rhlle removing food from the waste stream thereby helping move toward
the ultimate
goal
of zero waste.
While Roch.-ville has long promoted backyard cornposting to our residents, we are looking
forward to the day when a large scale waste food composting facility opens in Montgomery
County.
If
adopted, Bill2S-16 is a strong fIrst step that puts us on a pathway to realize that
goal and charts the course for service delivery to our community.
We request that you amend the legislation to include
all
Montgomery municipalities in the
composting strategic planning process. While the level of participation may vary among the
municipalities if a cotnposting program is created, cities can provide input that
is
relevant to
each co=unity, and assist Montgomery COUllty in the creation of a program that meets the
needs of all residents. Should the amendment be included
in
the enacted legislation, we
",ill
quickly proceed with naming a representative to the process.
MAYOR
Bridget Donnell
N~
..
ton
If
the County implements a program
in
the future, Rod-ville as a refuse collector
will
be
prepared
to
assess the implications and what adjustments would need to be made to its refuse
operations, if the City were to participate.
C0L1K1L
Seryl
L.
Feinberg
VirboioiOl D. OnJey
Julie l'alakDvidl Carr
. Mark PierzchaJa
ACTING CITY MANAGER
Cr~ig
L.
5imont.'au
CITYC.1..ERK
DIRECTOR OF mUNClL OPERATIONS
KathlreIl Cc.,r.way
Crt')' ATTORJI.'EY
D~bra
Yerg Dimicl
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Honorable Roger Berliner, Vice President
Page 2
August 2, 2016
Should you have any comments or questions on this matter, please do not hesitate to contact
Mark Charles, Environmental Management Chief, at (240) 314-8871 or
mcharles@rockvillemd.gov.
Sincerely,
Vir inla D. Onley. Councllmember
~~~~-
JUtiePalakovich COrT. Councllmember
cc:
O'l\W?~
Mark Pierzchal •• Councllrnember
Council President Floreen and County Council1llembers
Craig Simoneau, Acting City Manager
Rockville Environment Commission
Judy Ding, Acting Public Works Director
11aIk
Charles, Chief of Environmental Management
@
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DEP Comments - October 24,2016
CB 28-16 Provision on Residential Hauling by Private Refuse Haulers:
The last provision included in Council Bill 28-16 (Solid Waste - Strategic Plan to
Advance Compo sting, Compost Use and Food Waste Diversion) calls for the strategic
plan to consider the environmental impact of residential trash hauling by private haulers
in upcounty solid waste service districts in its recommendations.
• This provision does not fit within the construct of Bill 28-16, and seems to be out
of place among the other considerations and elements in the Bill which are
pertinent to increasing composting, compost use and food diversion;
• This provision raises a separate and distinct issue not directly related to the other
considerations in the Bill or the intended purpose ofthe Bill;
• Including this provision conveys the appearance of inadequate transparency on
private hauler concerns because it's embedded within this bill to advance
compo sting and increase food waste diversion;
• Those that would be most affected by this provision are not necessarily among the
same audience or participants as for the other issues that have been identified by
this legislation;
• Including this provision could cause a significant distraction and effort, detracting
from work focused on the more relevant issues to increasing compo sting, compost
use and food waste diversion; and
• Embedding this provision could be perceived by private haulers, especially small­
sized private haulers, as an attempt to negatively impact their economic livelihood
without the benefit of their awareness, participation, input, etc.
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Summary of the Food Waste Processing Facility RFP For T&E
Background:
DSWS has projected that a new "organics recycling" initiative diverting 30,000 TPY of food waste and soiled paper will be
needed in order to achieve its overall 70% recycling and waste diversion goal by 2020. By comparison, DSWS estimates
(based on it "tip&sort" waste composition studies) that approximately 146,300 TPY of food waste and another 61,000
TPY of soiled but compostable paper are disposed of annually. Lack of a processing facility is a distinct hurdle. DEP
requested the Northeast Maryland Waste Disposal Authority ("Authority") to issue a Request for Proposals (RFP) to
provide the processing of "Acceptable Organics" to include food residuals and food-soiled paper. The RFP is designed to
provide assured capacity for a 45,000 TPY. This should allow for a range of non-centralized options, and yet assure
reaching our recycling goal. The RFP was issued on September 9,2016 and responses are due on November 8, 2016.
Flow Control (Excerpt from RFP):
"The County is prepared to offer positive pricing incentives to encourage the private sector haulers to route clean loads of
commercial food waste and soiled paper through the Transfer Station or deliver directly to the acceptance facility."
County Commitment Envisioned to Support a New Facility:
Excerpt from RFP: The Authority (County) would guarantee to deliver, or cause to be delivered, the following
Acceptable Organics tonnages per Service Year.
Service Year
Tonnage
"Service Year" means any 365 day period (or
1.
10,000 tons
366 day period, in the event of a leap year)
2.
20,000 tons
commencing with the first day that the Facility
30,000 tons
3.
continuously accepts Acceptable organics, and
4.-10 30,000 tons
thereafter commencing on the anniversaries of
Ext. 1 11-15 30,000 tons
that commencement of service.
Ext. 2 16-20 30,000 tons
In each case, the Authority (County) reserves the right to deliver yard trim to meet the guarantee
In case more tonnage is needed, under the RFP, "The Contractor guarantees the ability to process a minimum of 1.5
times the Authority tonnage guarantee for the entirety of the initial term and each of the extension terms." Depending
upon the curbside collection decisions year 3 through 10 of the initial term may include yard trim for a total of 66,000
tons of foods scrap and residential yard trim.
Pricing:
Pricing must be given for the following tiers: Acceptable Organics (30,000 tons in Service Year 3; price applicable in
Service Year 1-10,000 tons and Service Year 2- 20,000 tons); Acceptable Organics, (30,001 tons to 45,000 tons total):
and Acceptable Organics (45,001 tons and up)
The RFP also allows a price "adder" for accepting loads that are too contaminated. In the case of a distant facility, the
RFP also allows the proposers to offer (at County option) to provide transportation from the County Transfer Station to
its facility (wherever located). In the case where organic materials are transferred through the County Transfer Station,
but the proposer does not provide transportation from the Transfer Station to its facility, the RFP allows for a price
adder for unacceptable materials that must be returned to delivery vehicle or a fee for the management of unacceptable
material. Finally, the RFP also allows the County to shift its currently collected curbside yard trim (about 36,000 TPY) to
the new facility. This provision is designed allow the County the future option to co-collect residential food waste
together with yard trim, reducing demand on its existing composting facility in Dickerson, and potentially allowing for
cost-effective collection of organics.
Term: The initial contract term will begin on or about the Effective Date and will be for ten (10) years, plus two (2)
optional five (5) -year terms, each to be exercised at the Authority's sole discretion.