Agenda Item 7B
April 18,2017
Action
MEMORANDUM
April 14, 2017
TO:
FROM:
SUBJECT:
County Council
Amanda Mihill, Legislative
Attorne~
Action:
Bill 38-16, Housing and Building Maintenance Standards - Foreclosed
Property Registration Penalty
Planning, Housing and Economic Development Committee recommendation (3-0):
enact
Bill 38-16.
Bill 38-16, Housing and Building Maintenance Standards - Foreclosed Property Registration
Penalty, sponsored by Lead Sponsor Councilmember Hucker and Co-Sponsors Councilmember
Navarro, then-Vice President Berliner, Councilmembers EIrich, Riemer, Leventhal, then-Council
President Floreen and Councilmember Rice, was introduced on September 20, 2016. A public
hearing was held on November 1 (see testimony and correspondence at ©20-27).1 A Planning,
Housing and Economic Development Committee worksession was held on March 28.
Bill 38-16 would impose a civil penalty for failure to register a foreclosure purchase. Additional
background materials from Lead Sponsor Hucker is attached at ©4.
Background
Section 14-126.1 of the Real Property Article requires the State Department of Labor, Licensing,
and Regulation to create an Internet-based Foreclosed Property Registry for information relating
to foreclosure sales of residential property. State law requires a foreclosure purchaser to submit an
"initial registration" on the Foreclosed Property Registry within 30 days of the foreclosure sell.
Within 30 days after a deed transferring title has been recorded, the foreclosure purchaser must
submit a "final registration". The state law allows a local jurisdiction to enact a law imposing a
civil penalty for failure to register, up to $1,000 (©14-19).
Much of the testimony related to Bill 38-16 was submitted in conjunction with Bill 39-16, Housing and Building
Maintenance Standards - Registration of Vacant Property and is not reproduced here. Copies of that testimony is in
the packet for Bi1139-16 (PHED agenda item #3).
1
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lssues/Committee Recommendation
The testimony and correspondence that the Council has received on this issue has been generally
supportive. However, a few issues have been raised, which are addressed below.
1.
Should the bill require the County to provide information to neighborhood associations?
Section 14-126.1 (g)(3) allows a local jurisdiction to provide information for a specific property
in the Foreclosed Property Registry to a person who owns property on the same block or a
homeowners association or condominium in which the property is located. The Washington Metro
Chapter of the Community Associations Institute urged the Council to add language to Bill 38-16
requiring the Department to provide this information when requested (see ©24).
Committee
discussion and recommendation (3-0):
Committee members discussed this issue with
representatives from DHCA who confirm that they do not anticipate any issues with voluntarily
providing appropriate parties with the information when requested, as the State law permits. The
Committee therefore did not recommend amending the bill.
2. Can the bill require final registration on the Registry?
The Hillandale Citizens Association
urged the Council to amend the bill to require that final registration and deed transfer be done
quickly (see ©21).
Council staff comments:
Instituting this sort of requirement would require a
change to the State law authorizing the Foreclosed Property Registry. This is not something that
can be achieved by amending Bill 38-16.
This packet contains:
Bill 38-16
Legislative Request Report
Sponsor material
Fiscal and Economic Impact statement
State law
Select testimony and correspondence
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Circle #
1
3
4
8
14
20
2
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Bill No.
38-16
Concerning: Housing
and
Building
Maintenance Standards - Foreclosed
Property Registration Penalty
Draft No. _1_
Revised:
3/7/2016
Introduced:
September 20,2016
Expires:
March 20, 2018
Enacted: _ _ _ _ _
~
_ _ __
Executive: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Effective: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Sunset Date:
.....!..:.No~n~e'__
_ _ _ _ __
ChI _ _ Laws of Mont. Co. _ __
I
COUNTY COUNCIL
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND
Lead Sponsor: Councilmember Hucker
Co-Sponsors: Councilmember Navarro, Vice President Berliner, Councilmembers EIrich, Riemer,
Leventhal, then-Council President Floreen and Councilmember Rice
AN
ACT to:
(1)
(3)
impose a civil penalty for failure to register a foreclosure purchase; and
generally amend the law regarding housing and building maintenance standards.
By adding
Montgomery County Code
Chapter 26, Housing and Building Maintenance Standards
Article I, General
Article II, Foreclosed Property Registry
Section 26-19
Boldface
Underlining
[Single boldface brackets]
Double underlining
[[Double boldface brackets]]
* * *
Heading or defined term.
Added to existing law by original bill.
Deletedfrom existing law by original bill.
Added by amendment.
Deletedfrom existing law or the bill by amendment.
Existing law unaffected by bill.
The County Council for Montgomery County, Maryland approves the following Act:
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BILL
No. 38-16
1
Sec. 1. Chapter 26 is amended
by
Articles I and II (Section 26-19) as
follows:
Article I. General.
2
3
4
*
*
*
5
Article
ll.
Foreclosed Property Registry.
26-19. Foreclosed Property Registry Penalty.
6
7
ill
Definitions.
In
this Section, the following words have the meanings
8
indicated:
Department
means the Department ofHousing and Community Affairs.
Director
means the Director of the Department.
Foreclosed Property Registry
means the internet-based Foreclosed
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Property Registry established Qy the State Department of Labor,
Licensing, and Regulation as required Qy Section 14-126.1 of the Real
Property Article ofthe Maryland Code.
Foreclosure purchaser
means the person identified as the purchaser on
the report of sale required Qy Maryland Rule 14-305 for
sale ofresidential property.
~
foreclosure
18
19
20
®
Registration required.
A foreclosure purchaser must submit any
required registration to the Foreclosed Property Registry as required Qy
Section 14-126.1 ofthe Real Property Article ofthe Maryland Code.
21
22
23
24
ill
Penalties.
Any
violation of this Article is
~
civil violation. The
maximum penalty for
or repeat offense.
~
violation of this Article is $1,000 for an initial
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LEGISLATIVE REQUEST REPORT
Bill 38-16
Housing and Building Maintenance Standards
-
Foreclosed Property Registration Penalty
DESCRIPTION:
PROBLEM:
Bill 38-16 would impose a civil penalty for failure to register a
foreclosure purchase.
In
2012, the General Assembly enacted House Bill 1373, which
requires the purchaser of a foreclosed property to register with the
state. The law also authorizes local jurisdictions to impose a fme for
failing to register.
To use the authority given by the state to impose a fine for failing to
register a foreclosed property purchase.
GOALS AND
OBJECTIVES:
COORDINATION:
FISCAL IMPACT:
ECONOMIC
IMPACT:
EVALUATION:
EXPERIENCE
ELSEWHERE:
SOURCE OF
INFORMATION:
APPLICATION
WITHIN
MUNICIPALITIES:
PENALTIES:
To be requested.
To be requested.
To be requested.
To be researched.
Amanda Mihill, Legislative Attorney, 240-777-7815
To be researched.
$1,000 for failing to register.
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MONTGOMERY COUNTY COUNCIL
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND
TOM HUCKER
COUNCILMEMBER
DISTRICT 5
MEMORANDUM
TO:
FROM:
DATE:
RE:
Councilmembers
Tom Hucker
July 13,2016
Establishing a penalty for failing to register a foreclosed property
I will soon be introducing a series of housing bills that are meant to address the growing
number of neglected and vacant properties in the county. The first seeks to incentivize property
owners and banks to adhere to current law and ensure homes are properly maintained and taxes
are paid.
In 2012, at the request of Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation
(DLRR) and the Maryland Foreclosure Task Force, the General Assembly passed HB 1373 ­
Foreclosed Property Registry. The law requires the purchaser of a foreclosed property to register
with DLLR within 30 days of the property's foreclosure sale. The law also authorizes local
jurisdictions to enact legislation to impose a fine of $1,000 for failing to register. The law was
meant to address the nine to eighteen month period that frequently occurs between the date of a
foreclosure and the date that the property title is transferred. During this time, local jurisdictions
have a hard time identifying the party responsible for maintenance, security, and taxes.
To date, Montgomery County has not enacted any punitive fine and hundreds of.
foreclosed properties have gone unregistered. Based on the data from the State Foreclosure
Registry, there were 1,432 foreclosures countywide in FYI5. Ofthese, 34% (492) either failed to
register or registered long after the deadline. These unregistered properties are much more likely
to go unmaintained costing the county thousands in housing code enforcement and dragging
down nearby property values.
[II
In addition, many purchasers - often banks and out-of-state investors - wait to record the
deed to the property until it is resold to another purchaser)!) By circumventing the normal
process and improperly (and illegally) transferring the property to a new homeowner in this
fashion, the County does not receive the recordation tax or the transfer tax, which shortchanges
County coffers of over $6,000 in revenue for a property of average value.
That is why I am introducing legislation to enact a penalty of$I,OOO per day for a
foreclosed property that has not been registered. This deterrent is critically needed when
[1
]https:1
Iwww.richmondfed.orgl-/medialrichmondfedorglconferences_and_ events/community_ developmentl20
121
pdflmdJoreclosure_task_force_rpt.pdf
®
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foreclosed property owners can save many thousands of dollars in maintenance costs and taxes
by refusing to register and transfer ownership of their properties. These properties, often are in
persistent disrepair, hurt neighborhoods and force the County to expend resources to enforce
code violations. This bill gives us another 'stick' we can use to address this problem.
Attached is a copy of this bill and an FAQ sheet. I hope you will join me in cosponsoring
this legislation. Please let me know ifI can provide any additional information.
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Foreclosure Registry
Frequently Asked Questions
1. What is the Maryland Foreclosed Property Registry?
The Foreclosed Property Registry is an online system managed by the Office of the
Commissioner of Financial Regulation in the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing
and Regulation (DLLR). State law requires that every residential property purchased at a
foreclosure sale be registered in this system.
2. What is the purpose of the foreclosure registry?
In 2012, the Maryland Foreclosure Task Force identified a limbo period of nine to
eighteen months between the property's foreclosure sale and the deed recordation in the
public land records. During this limbo period, it is difficult for jurisdictions to identify the
party responsible for foreclosed property, which often causes the property to fall into
disrepair. The Foreclosed Property Registry closes this gap by creating one centralized
database of information.
3. What causes this limbo period?
According to the Foreclosure Task Force, this limbo period is caused by the following six
factors:
Right of property owner to challenge the foreclosure auction
Time required for Courts to ratify the foreclosure sale
Clearing of any priority government liens against the property
Lengthy eviction proceedings or eviction requirements
Market demand or lack thereof for the property by a new homeowner; and
Whether or not foreclosure purchasers record the deed prior to resale, or in the
alternative, wait to record upon resale to a third-party purchaser.
4. Why would a foreclosure purchaser wait to record a deed upon resale?
By postponing the deed recordation, a foreclosure purchaser can avoid paying thousands
of dollars in transfer and recordation taxes, which become the responsibility of the
third-party purchaser.
5. How much are property transfer and recordation taxes?
Transfer taxes are generally 1
%
of the value of the improved (building) and unimproved
(land) value of a property transferred to a new owner. Recordation taxes are 0.69% ofthe
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amount of the transaction. In Montgomery County, the recordation and transfer tax for a
property of median value in Montgomery County is about $6,600. The foreclosure
purchaser avoids paying these taxes, and often passes the costs on to the next person who
purchases the property.
6. What is a foreclosure sale?
In Maryland, a lender may file for foreclosure on a property 45 days after the first missed
mortgage payment. If the loan is not brought current or the loan is not modified, then the
lender can sell the property at a foreclosure sale. Typically, loans sold at foreclosure are
bought by other banks or real estate investors.
7. Who has to register the property?
The company or individual that purchases the foreclosed property is required to register
the property. The property does not need to be re-registered when the foreclosure
purchaser sells the property to a third-party purchaser.
8. What is the process for registering a property?
Purchasers are required to submit an initial registration of the property within 30 days of
the foreclosure sale, which includes the name, address, and telephone number of the
purchaser, their legal representative,property maintenance company, and the property's
occupancy status. The purchaser is also required to complete a final registration within 30
days of recording the property's new deed.
9. How is compliance enforced?
The statute that created the registry gives local jurisdictions the authority to enforce
compliance. A jurisdiction may enact a local law that imposes a civil penalty for failure
to register a property.
10. What is the noncompliance rate?
DLLR estimates that 20% of foreclosure purchasers do not register their property or
register after the deadline. In Montgomery County, however, that number is much higher.
In FY15, there were 1,432 foreclosures in the county, and 34% either failed to register or
were registered after the deadline.
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MEMORANDUM
October 10, 2016
FROM:
Jennifer A.
Hughe~ir~.c.
' ffice of Management and Budget
Alexandre A.
Esp~~
ctor. Department of Finance
SUBJECT:
FEIS
for
Bill 38-16, Housing and Building
Maintenan~e
Standards .... Foreclosed Property
Registration Penalty; and
Bill 39-16, Housing and Building Maintenanc.ti;Standards .... Registration of
Vacant Property
r~lbenced
Please find attached the fiscal and economic impact statements
for
the above­
legislations .
.lAH:fz
t:c; Bonnie Kirkland,
Assistant Chief Adlninistrative
Officer
Lisa Austin. Offices of the County Executive
Joy Nurmi, Special
Assistarit
to
the County Executive
Patrick Lacefield.
Director, Public Information
Office
Clar0I1Ce
J. Snuggs, Director, Department of Housing and Community Affairs
David Platt,
Department
of
Finance
Dennis Hetman. Department of Finance
Pofcn Salem, Office of Management and Budget
Na{~em
Mia.
Office
of
Management and Budget
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Fiscal Impact Statement
BiU38-16
Housing and Building Maintenance Standards - Foreclosed Property Registration Penalty
1.
Legislative Summary
The proposed legislation would impose a civil penalty for failure to register a foreclosure
purchase. Bill 38-16 would enact the County's authority referenced in HB-1373 which
requires every residential property pUrchased at a foreclosure sale
to
be
registered within
30 days into the Foreclosed Property Registry. HB-1373 authorizes local jurisdictions to
impose a fine of$l,OOO for failing to register. State law was intended to address a limbo
period of nine to eighteen months between the property's foreclosure sale and the deed
recordation in the public 1and records. During this limbo period, it is difficult for local
jurisdictions
to
identify the party responsible for maintenance. security. and taxes of
foreclosed property. The Foreclosed Property Registryis designed to close this gap by
creating one centralized database of infonnation.
2. An estimate of changes In County revenues and expenditures regardless of whether the
revenues or eX1?enditures are assumed in the recommended or approved budget. Includes
source of information, assumptions, and methodologies used.
The Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation (DLLR) estimates
that
twenty percent offoreclosure purchaserS do noi register properties or register after the
deadline, and that number is much higher
in
Montgomery County. According to the
"Foreclosure Registry Frequently Asked Questions", which was submitted in the
introduction package for Bill 38-16, there were 1,432 foreclosures countywide in FY15.
Of
these, 34% (492 properties) either failed to register or were registered after the
deadline. Bill 38..16 would impose a maximum penalty of$1 ,000 for noncompliance.
Therefore, assuming the aforementioned 492 properties,. this would generate an additional
$492,000 in revenue. However, the intent of the bill is to increase the compliance rate.
Therefore, the revenueS could be less.
DHCA currently does not perfOllIl the billing and full compliance of foreclosed
properties to be registered in the Foreclosed Property Registry. DHCA administers the
Clean and Lien Program, a similar program, aimed at enforcing code compliance at
certain noncompliant ownership properties. The Clean and Lien program utilizes a
Program Manager] position
to
maintain 200·250 properties per year. DHCA estimates
Bill 38-16 could require the same level of effort with one additional staff
to
enforce code
compliance at those noncompliant foreclosed properties. DHCA estimates that the
total
personnel cost, including fringe benefits, for a Program Manager I position is $95,165.
The compliance rate
'Will
be monitored to determine
if
the additional staffing is necessary.
3. Revenue and expenditure estimates covering at least the next 6 fiscal years,
The total estimated six-year revenue or expenditure is based on the assumption of
. approximately 492 foreclosed properties remain noncornpliantper year:
I
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FY17
t
FY18
FY19
FY20
FY21
FYZ2
Total
I
Revenue
(@$l,OOO
penalty per
property)
..-
492,000 492,000 492,000 492,000 492,000 492,000 2,952,000
.............-.---..-......- ...".-.. _ 1-.-.----..-1--..--­
!
Expenditure
1
~
I
(1.0 FTEfor
!
Program
I
Manager
I)
95,165
570~993
95,1651 95,165
I
95,165
95,165\ 95,165
Note: The percentage ofnoncomplIance foreclosed properties
in
Montgomery County is hlgher than the
State average (20"Aj. The revenue estimates are based on the assumption
(if
34%
ofidentified foreclosed
properties in FYi5. Personnell....ost does not include fuJure wage increases.
I
I
I
4. An actuarial analysis through the entire amortization period for each bill
that
would affect
retiree pension or group insurance costs.
Not Applicable.
5. An estimate ofexpenditures related to County's information technology (IT) systems,
including Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems.
Not applicable.
6. Later actions that may affect future revenue and expel1ditures ifthe bill authorizes future
spending.
Not applicable; the proposed legislation does not authorize
future
spending.
7.
An
estimate of the staff time needed to implement the bill.
As mentioned in
#2;
DHCA currently does not perform this
task.
DHCA administers the
Clean and Lien Program, a similar program, aimed at enforcing code compliance at
certain noncompliant ownership properties. The Clean and Lien program utilizes a
Program Manager I position to maintain
200-250
properties per year. DHCA estimates
Bill 38-16 could require the same level of effort,
ifthe
non-compliance rate isn't
significantly reduced. with one additional staff
to
enforce code compliance
at
those
noncompliant foreclosed properties. DHCA estimates
that
the
total
personnel cost,
including fringe benefits, for a Program Manager I position is
$95,165.
8.
An
explanation of how the addition of new staff responsibilitit..'S would affect other duties.
The proposed task cannot be absorbed
with
current
staff
and would require an additional
1.0 FTE.
9. An estimate ofcosts when an additional appropriation is needed.
2
@
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An additional appropriation
Qf$95,165
for a Program Manager
1
position could
be
necessary if compliance rates remain unchanged.
10. A
description of
any
variable that could affect revenue and cost estimates.
The revenue estimates could be affected by the number of foreclosure events in a given
fiscal year, the uncertainty of whether the
$1,000 penalty
for noncompliance
is
challenged and upheld in court, and whether the legislation's goal of increasing
compliance is achieved.
11.
Ranges ofrevenue or expenditures that
are
uncertain or difficult
to
project.
Not applicable.
12. If a bill is likely to have no fiscal impact, why that is the case.
Not applicable.
13.
Other fiscal impacts or comments.
Not applicable.
14. The following contributed to and concurred
with
this analysis:
Clarence Snuggs, DHCA
Tim Goetzinger, DHCA
Chris
Anderson,
DHCA
Dan, McHugh,
DHCA
Pofen Salem, Office of Management and Budget
JO(61(~
Date
3
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Econolllic
lmp~ct
Sutement
Bill 38-16,
Housmg
and
Building
Maintenance
Standards-,For~dosedProperty
Registration Penalty
Background:
This legislation would impose a civil penalty for failure to register a foreclosure purchase. In
2012,
the
General
Ass(;..~bly
enacted
House
Bill
B73that
requires the
purchaser
ofa foreclosed
property to register
~ith
the state and authorizes local jurisdictions
to
imptlse
a fine
for failing to
regi~ier.
1. The sources of information, assumptions, and methodologies used.
Sources of infomlation include the Maryland Department ofHousing and Community
Development (DRCD), RealtyTrac;
and
the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and
Regulation (DLLR). The Department
of
Finance (Finance) did not develop assumptions or
methodologies in
the
preparation ofthe economic impaCt statement.
According to DHCD in
its
report "Property Foreclosures in Maryland; Third Quarter2015",
there were 943 property foreclosure events or foreclosure filings in Montgomery County
which
represented
8.7
percent of the total statewide events. Those
event..:;
included notices of
default
(313),
notices of sales (412), and lender purchast.-s (291). The sum of the three events
exceeds the number of total foreclosure filings because DHCD eliminates multiple counting
of events from the total. The total foreclosure filings during the third quarter of 2015 was 6,4
percent above
the
rate during the third quarter of2014.
addresses the issue ofthe
failure
by
purchasers of foreclosed property to register
the property or failure to register after the deadline with
the
DLLR's Fort'Closed Property
Registry (Registry). According to data provided
by
the Registry, 492 properties :tailed to
register or registered
after the
deadline in
FY15. Bill 38-15
would impose
a
maximum
penalty or flne of $1.000 for each
failure
to register or registered after the deadline.
Therefore, the maximum total cost to purchasers offoreclosed property would be $492,000.
2. A description of any variable that could affect the economic impact estimates.
Bi1l38~
16
'The purpose of the economic impact statement is not to analyze the economic impact of
foreclosures on the County's economy but the economic impact attributed to imposing a finc
for purchasers who failed to regisK.'f and registered
after
the deadline.
As
SUell,
the variable
that could impact the County's economy is the number of properties that failed
to
register
and the
an10unt
of the
fmc per
noncompliance.
3. The Bill's positive or negative effect,
if
any on
employment~
spending, savings,
investment, incomes, and property values in the County.
Based
on data
provided
in
paragraph
1, Bill 38-16
would have a modest impact on
the
incomes of purchasers of fort'Closed property who fail
to
register or failed to meet the
deadline.
The
legislation would not have a significant impact on the overall economy.
Page 1
of2
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Economic Impact Statement
Bill 38-16, Housing and Building Maintenance Standards -Foreclosed Property
R.egistration Penalty
4.
If
a
Bill
is
likely
to
have
no economic impact, why
is
that the case?
See #3
5. The following wntributed to or concurred with this analysis:
David
Platt,
Dennis
Hetman, and Robert Hagedoorn, Finance.
-,-.~-.~
Alexandre A. Espinosa, Din.x:tor
Department of Finance
Page 2 of2
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§
14-126.1. Internet-based Foreclosed Property Registry, MD REAL PROP
§
14-126.1
West's Annotated Code of Maryland
Real Property (Refs
&
Annos)
Title
14.
Miscellaneous Rules (Refs
&
Annos)
Subtitle
1.
Miscellaneous Rules
MD Code, Real Property,
§
14-126.1
§
14-126.1.
Internet-based Foreclosed Property Registry
Effective: October
1, 2014
Currentness
Defmitions
(a)(l) In this section the following words have the meanings indicated.
(2) "Department" means the Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation.
(3) "Foreclosed Property Registry" means the Foreclosed Property Registry established by the Department under
subsection (b) of this section.
(4) "Foreclosure purchaser" means the person identified as the purchaser on the report of sale required by Maryland
Rule 14-305 for a foreclosure sale of residential property.
(5) "Fund" means the Foreclosed Property Registry Fund established by the Department under subsection (i) of this
section.
(6) "Local jurisdiction" means:
(i) A county; or
(ii) A municipal corporation.
(7) "Residential property" means real property improved by four or fewer dwelling units that are designed principally
and are intended for human habitation.
Registry for information relating to foreclosure sales of residential property
(b) The Department shall establish and maintain an Internet-based Foreclosed Property Registry for information relating
to foreclosure sales of residential property.
WESflAW 'D 20'17 Thomson Feuters. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
1
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§
14-126.1. Internet-based Foreclosed Property Registry, MD REAL PROP
§
14-126.1
Written acknowledgment of section requirements
(c) At the time of a foreclosure sale of residential property, the person responsible for conducting the foreclosure shall
obtain from the foreclosure purchaser a written acknowledgment of the requirements of this section.
Initial registration to Registry
(d)(l) Within 30 days after a foreclosure sale of residential property, a foreclosure purchaser shall submit an initial
registration to the Foreclosed Property Registry.
(2) The initial registration shall:
(i) Be in the form the Department requires; and
(ii) Contain the following information:
1. The name, telephone number, and address of the foreclosure purchaser;
2. The street address of the property that is the subject of the foreclosure sale;
3. The date of the foreclosure sale;
4. Whether the property is a single-family or multifamily property;
5. The name and address of the person, including a substitute purchaser, who is authorized to accept legal service
for the foreclosure purchaser;
6. To the best of the foreclosure purchaser's knowledge at the time of registration:
A. Whether the residential property is vacant; and
B.
The name, telephone number, and street address of the person who is responsible for the maintenance of
the property; and
7. Whether the foreclosure purchaser has possession of the property.
(3) Within 30 days after a deed transferring title to the residential property has been recorded, the foreclosure purchaser
shall submit a final registration to the Foreclosed Property Registry.
WESTLAW
(j
20-:7
Thomson f:;;eulers.
No claim to original U,S, Government Works.
2
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§
14-126.1. Internet-based Foreclosed Property Registry, MD REAL PROP
§
14-126.1
(4) The final registration shall:
(i) Be in the form the Department requires; and
(ii) Contain the following information as of the date of final registration:
1. The name, telephone number, and address of the owner on the deed;
2. The date of the ratification ofthe sale; and
3. The date the deed was recorded.
Filing fees for registration
(e)(1) The filing fees for registering a residential property are:
(i) $50 for an initial registration
fIled
within the time period required under subsection (d)(l) of this section; and
(ii) $100 for an initial registration filed after the time period required under subsection (d)(1) of this section.
(2) There is no fee for a final registration.
(3) A filing fee paid under paragraph (1) of this subsection is nonrefundable.
(4) A local jurisdiction may enact a local law that imposes a civil penalty for failure to register under this section in
an amount not exceeding $1,000.
Abatement of nuisance on registered property
(f)(1) Subject to paragraph (2) of this subsection, a local jurisdiction that, in accordance with any applicable building code
or local ordinance, abates a nuisance on a residential property registered under this section or takes action to maintain
a residential property registered under this section may collect the cost associated with the abatement or other action as
a charge included on the residential property's property tax bill.
(2)(i) The cost associated with an abatement or other action taken under paragraph (1) of this subsection may not
be included as a charge on the residential property's property tax bill unless the local jurisdiction provides advance
written notice in accordance with subparagraph (ii) of this paragraph to:
I. The person identified in the registry who is authorized to accept legal service for the foreclosure purchaser;
and~
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U.S. Government VVorks.
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§
14-126.1. Internet-based Foreclosed Property Registry, MD REAL PROP
§
14-126.1
2. The person identified in the registry who is responsible for the maintenance of the property.
(ii) The notice described in subparagraph (i) of this paragraph shall:
1. Describe the intended abatement or other action the local jurisdiction intends to take; and
2.
Be provided:
A.
In accordance with the notice provisions of the applicable building code or local ordinance; or
B. If the applicable building code or local ordinance does not provide for notice, at least
30
days before the
local jurisdiction abates the nuisance or takes action to maintain the property.
Access to Foreclosed Property Registry
(g)(1) The Foreclosed Property Registry:
(i) Is not a public record as defined by
§
4-101 of the General Provisions Articie; and
(ii) Is not subject to Title 4 of the General Provisions Article.
(2) The Department may authorize access to the Foreclosed Property Registry only to local jurisdictions, their agencies,
and representatives and State agencies.
(3) Notwithstanding paragraphs (1) and
(2)
of this subsection, the Department or a local jurisdiction may provide
i~formation
for a specific property
in
the Foreclosed Property Registry to:
(i) A person who owns property on the same block; or
(ii)
A homeowners association or condominium in which the property is located.
Revenue from filing fees distributed to Fund
(h) Revenue collected from the filing fees required under subsection (e)(1) of this section shall be distributed to the Fund.
Foreclosed Property Registry Fund
(i)(1) There is a Foreclosed Property Registry Fund in the Department.
VlE:SYLA\"t () 20F Thomson Feuters. hlo dairn to original U,S. Government Works.
4
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§
14-126.1. Internet-based Foreclosed Property Registry, MD REAL PROP
§
14-126.1
(2) The purpose of the Fund is to support the development, administration, and maintenance of the Foreclosed
Property Registry established under this section.
(3) The Department shall administer the Fund.
(4)(i) The Fund is a special, nonlapsingfund that is not subject to
§
7-302 of
the
State Finance and Procurement Article.
(ii) The State Treasurer shall hold the Fund separately, and the Comptroller shall account for the Fund.
(5) The Fund consists of:
(i) Revenue distributed to the Fund under subsection (h) of this section;
(ii) Investment earnings of the Fund;
(iii) Money appropriated in the State budget to the Fund; and
(iv) Any other money from any other source accepted for the benefit of the Fund.
(6)(i) The State Treasurer shall invest the money of the Fund in the same manner as other State money may be invested.
(ii) Any investment earnings of the Fund shall be paid into the Fund.
Laws requiring notice
(j)(l)
Except as provided in paragraph (2) of this subsection, only the State may enact a law requiring a notice to be filed
with a unit of government to register residential properties that are subject to foreclosure.
(2) This subsection does not restrict or otherwise affect the ability of a unit of government to require a registration
or notice to be filed for a purpose other than one relating to foreclosure, even
if
a property to be identified in the
registration or notice is subject to foreclosure.
Credits
Added by Acts 2012, c. 155,
§
1, eff. Oct. 1,2012. Amended by Acts 2014, c. 104, § 2, eff. Oct. 1,2014.
MD Code, Real Property,
§
14-126.1, MD REAL PROP
§
14-126.1
Current through Chapter 2 from the 2017 Regular Session of the General Assembly
-"'
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5
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§
14-126.1. Internet-based Foreclosed Property Registry, MD REAL PROP
§
14-126.1
End of Docllment
{\ 2017 Thomson Rc-ut-:rs. No claim
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Montgomery County Council Public Hearing
Bill38-16: Housing and Building Maintenance Standards­
Foreclosed Property Registration Penalty
Bill39:16: Housing and Building Maintenance Standards ­
Registration of Vacant Property
Tuesday, November 1,2016
Vicki Vergagni
President, Board of Directors and
On-Site Community Manager
Glen Waye Gardens Condominium
Bill 38-16: Opposed
Bill39:16: Opposed
My name is Vicki Vergagni. I represent both myself and 214 master-metered
condominium units in Glen Waye Gardens. My positions on the two aforementioned bills are
based on 40+ years of owning and living in a condominium, 16 years of leading my community
as the Board president and serving as its on-site manager, and five years of serving as a
Commissioner on the County's CCOC - with two years as Vice Chair. As the representative of
my community and as an individual, we are opposed to the two aforementioned bills.
Bill 38-16 that penalizes entities for failing to register in the State's Foreclosure Registry
foreclosed properties that they have purchased is unclear.
In
one portion of the bills' documentation, the total penalty is $1,000. This is
inappropriate as transfer taxes average $6,000 per property, so there is a net savings
of$5,000 if the property does not get registered and is simply transferred from a
lender's foreclosure stock to a new individual owner.
In another portion of the bill's documentation, the penalty is $1,000 per day. This is
draconian at best and would most likely ensnare individuals who are making their
one-and-only purchase at a foreclosure sale.
Thus, we cannot support Bill 38-16.
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Hillandale Citizens Association, Inc.
Montgomery County Bills 38-16
&
39-16
Penalty for Not Registering Foreclosed Properties
&
Listing Vacant Properties
The Executive Committee of the Hillandale Citizens Association supports
Councilmember Hucker's two bills crafted to improve the Department of Housing and
Community Affairs (DHCA) management of vacant properties. We ask that Council also
consider the following:
• Add a time requirement for final registration with the State Foreclosure Registry
• Add a provision to have DHCA list designated unmaintained, vacant properties on their web
site, as they do condemned properties
• Remove the two-year grace period for listing properties in foreclosure action from the
unmaintained, vacant property designation
Bill 38-16 --- Enacting the State's Foreclosure Registry Penalty Provision in MoCo
Requiring the purchaser of a foreclosed property to promptly report their purchase to the
state's foreclosed property database will improve DHCA's ability to identify responsible
parties. Imposing a $1,000 fine will encourage buyers to act quickly and acknowledge their
ownership with the
initial
registration.
Unfortunately, the bill stops short of requiring
thefinal
registration and actual deed
transfer be done quickly following the court's ratification of a foreclosure sale. Please make this
a requirement.
Bill 39-16 - New Blight-Reduction Tool: Unmaintained Vacant Residential Property List
Establishing and implementing aMoCo
unmaintained vacant residential property
list
with an annual inspection requirement and fees will help DHCA to address all types of
abandoned properties that drag down a neighborhood. Since many of these properties will not
have voluntary registration, it is imperative that DHCA aggressively uses the authority provided
in this bill to add qualifying properties to the list. Furthermore, having inspection fees escalate
within the service request/complaint system may encourage absentee owners to consider selling
or renovating the home. We ask that this list be published on DHCA's web site.
Unfortunately, the more critical vacant, abandoned, unmaintained homes in Hillandale
have been lengthy, stalled, or unprosecuted foreclosures. These have not been contested
foreclosures for the most part. Some cases have been dismissed due to inactivity, then restarted
or refiled. With this experience, the 24-month grace provision in the legislation is too
lenient. All vacant and unmaintained homes should be treated equally based on the condition of
the property. These properties need to be inspected, with registration charges and fees being
added to the
tax
bill. Mortgage companies routinely pay the tax bills to avoid the possibility of a
tax sale. Please remember that the negative impact of these homes on surrounding properties is
significant and action must not be delayed.
We also encourage Council to review with DHCA the Department's policies regarding
their existing powers to enforce housing code standards, including their ultimate tool, requiring a
property owner to "repair or remove" a deteriorated, vacant dwelling through the District Court
process. Several years ago, this approach was used in Hillandale with two successful
:+
c-..
,~-\
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outcomes. One home was sold and renovated while another was demolished. This is a tool in
their tool box that needs to be carefully used when necessary.
Thank you for considering our input as Council reviews and adopts Bills 38-16 and 39­
16.
Margie Goergen-Rood, President
Eileen Finnegan, Zoning and Planning
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\~
Woody Brosnan
Representing PREZCO, the Presidents' Council of Silver Spring Civic Associations
Re: Bill 38-16
Honorable Councilmembers,
I will reserve most of my comments for Bill 39-16, but the two bills work hand in
hand. It makes little sense to have a system for enforcing the maintenance of
vacant properties if you can't make the owners register the properties in the first
place. This must have been contemplated by legislators when they added
permissive language for the $1,000 fine.
This bill is supported by civic associations representing the Indian Springs, Long
Branch, Lyttonsville, North Hills of Sligo, North Woodside, Rosemary Hills, Seven
Oaks-Evanswood, Woodmoor-Pinecrest, Woodside, Woodside Forest and
Woodside Park neighborhoods.
9101 Louis Avenue
Silver Spring, Md. 20910
301-588-0025
woodybrosnan@verizon.net
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Ms. Nancy Floreen
President
Montgomery County Council
100 Maryland Avenue
Rockville, Maryland 20850
Re: Bill No. 38-16, Housing and Building Maintenance Standards
Foreclosed Property Registration
SUPPORT WITH AMENDMENTS
Dear Ms. Floreen:
The Washington Metro Chapter of the Community Associations Institute (WMCCAI) supports Bill No. 38­
16 which is intended to encourage purchasers of foreclosed residential property in Montgomery County
to register the property with the Foreclosed Property Registry administered by the Maryland
Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation (DLLR), as required by Section 14-126.1 of the Real
Property Article of the
1\11
a ryland Code, by making failure to register a civil violation of the Montgomery
County Code.
WMCCAI members include the volunteer leaders of condominiums, homeowners associations, and
housing co-operatives in Montgomery County and throughout the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area;
WMCCAI members also include management companies, attorneys, accountants and other service
providers who assist these associations in operating their communities.
Prompt registration with the DLLR Foreclosed Property Registry is important for the Montgomery
County Department of Housing and Community Affairs (DHCA) and condominiums and homeowners
associations because the registration information required includes the contact information for the
purchaser and for the person who is responsible for maintaining the property after a foreclosure sale.
Once a property is registered, the County will more easily be able to notify those persons of any
required maintenance and housing code violations.
Access to this information by condominiums and homeowner associations will similarly allow these
associations to notify the owner regarding maintenance and repair violations of the association
covenants and the obligation to pay assessments to the association. Section 14-126.1(g) allows, but
does not require, a local jurisdiction to provide the information in the DLLR Foreclosed Property Registry
to a person who owns property on the same block as the foreclosed property and to condominiums and
homeowner associations where the property is located.
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WMCCAI proposes an amendment to Bill No. 38-16 which would require DHCA to provide the
information in the Foreclosed Property Registry to a person who owns property on the same block as
the foreclosed property and to condominiums and homeowner associations where the property is
located. The text ofthis suggested amendment is enclosed.
Thank you for considering our comments. For questions or additional information, you may reach me by
email atmitch@mlfarrahproperties.com.
Sincerely,
Mitch Farrah, Chair
WMCCAI Maryland Legislative Committee
Enclosure
Cc: Mr. Thomas Hucker w/enc. via email (councilmember.hucker@montgomerycountymd.gov
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Proposed Amendment to Montgomery County Bill No. 38-16
Housing and Building Maintenance Standards, Foreclosed Property
Section 26-19 is amended by adding the following subsection (d):
(d)
Registration Information.
The Director shall provide information for a specific property in the
Foreclosed Property Registry, upon written request, to
(i)
a person who owns property on the same
block and
(ij)
a homeowners association or condominium in which the property is located, as permitted
by Section 14-126.1(g) of the Real Property Article of the Maryland Code.
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Bill 38-16, Housing and Building Maintenance Standards - Foreclosed Property Registration Penalty
Testimony by: Carolyn Thompson 11/1/2016
I'm concerned that individual home owners of record and home owner associations are shouldering the
bill for buyers of foreclosed properties, after they have purchased the property, because they've failed
to record the purchase.
The buyer should be required to file their purchase through the registry within two business days of
purchase.
The fee for failure to register the sale should be $1,000 per month, with $100.00 or less of this fee going
administering the penalty. The remaining funds should go to the association to be reimbursed the non­
payment. Any excess offunds, over and above the outstanding association fees will remain with the
association to help offset the cost of deferred maintenance.
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Agenda Item 7B
April 18,2017
Action
MEMORANDUM
April 14, 2017
TO:
FROM:
SUBJECT:
County Council
Amanda Mihill, Legislative
Attorne~
Action:
Bill 38-16, Housing and Building Maintenance Standards - Foreclosed
Property Registration Penalty
Planning, Housing and Economic Development Committee recommendation (3-0):
enact
Bill 38-16.
Bill 38-16, Housing and Building Maintenance Standards - Foreclosed Property Registration
Penalty, sponsored by Lead Sponsor Councilmember Hucker and Co-Sponsors Councilmember
Navarro, then-Vice President Berliner, Councilmembers EIrich, Riemer, Leventhal, then-Council
President Floreen and Councilmember Rice, was introduced on September 20, 2016. A public
hearing was held on November 1 (see testimony and correspondence at ©20-27).1 A Planning,
Housing and Economic Development Committee worksession was held on March 28.
Bill 38-16 would impose a civil penalty for failure to register a foreclosure purchase. Additional
background materials from Lead Sponsor Hucker is attached at ©4.
Background
Section 14-126.1 of the Real Property Article requires the State Department of Labor, Licensing,
and Regulation to create an Internet-based Foreclosed Property Registry for information relating
to foreclosure sales of residential property. State law requires a foreclosure purchaser to submit an
"initial registration" on the Foreclosed Property Registry within 30 days of the foreclosure sell.
Within 30 days after a deed transferring title has been recorded, the foreclosure purchaser must
submit a "final registration". The state law allows a local jurisdiction to enact a law imposing a
civil penalty for failure to register, up to $1,000 (©14-19).
Much of the testimony related to Bill 38-16 was submitted in conjunction with Bill 39-16, Housing and Building
Maintenance Standards - Registration of Vacant Property and is not reproduced here. Copies of that testimony is in
the packet for Bi1139-16 (PHED agenda item #3).
1
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lssues/Committee Recommendation
The testimony and correspondence that the Council has received on this issue has been generally
supportive. However, a few issues have been raised, which are addressed below.
1.
Should the bill require the County to provide information to neighborhood associations?
Section 14-126.1 (g)(3) allows a local jurisdiction to provide information for a specific property
in the Foreclosed Property Registry to a person who owns property on the same block or a
homeowners association or condominium in which the property is located. The Washington Metro
Chapter of the Community Associations Institute urged the Council to add language to Bill 38-16
requiring the Department to provide this information when requested (see ©24).
Committee
discussion and recommendation (3-0):
Committee members discussed this issue with
representatives from DHCA who confirm that they do not anticipate any issues with voluntarily
providing appropriate parties with the information when requested, as the State law permits. The
Committee therefore did not recommend amending the bill.
2. Can the bill require final registration on the Registry?
The Hillandale Citizens Association
urged the Council to amend the bill to require that final registration and deed transfer be done
quickly (see ©21).
Council staff comments:
Instituting this sort of requirement would require a
change to the State law authorizing the Foreclosed Property Registry. This is not something that
can be achieved by amending Bill 38-16.
This packet contains:
Bill 38-16
Legislative Request Report
Sponsor material
Fiscal and Economic Impact statement
State law
Select testimony and correspondence
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Circle #
1
3
4
8
14
20
2
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Bill No.
38-16
Concerning: Housing
and
Building
Maintenance Standards - Foreclosed
Property Registration Penalty
Draft No. _1_
Revised:
3/7/2016
Introduced:
September 20,2016
Expires:
March 20, 2018
Enacted: _ _ _ _ _
~
_ _ __
Executive: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Effective: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Sunset Date:
.....!..:.No~n~e'__
_ _ _ _ __
ChI _ _ Laws of Mont. Co. _ __
I
COUNTY COUNCIL
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND
Lead Sponsor: Councilmember Hucker
Co-Sponsors: Councilmember Navarro, Vice President Berliner, Councilmembers EIrich, Riemer,
Leventhal, then-Council President Floreen and Councilmember Rice
AN
ACT to:
(1)
(3)
impose a civil penalty for failure to register a foreclosure purchase; and
generally amend the law regarding housing and building maintenance standards.
By adding
Montgomery County Code
Chapter 26, Housing and Building Maintenance Standards
Article I, General
Article II, Foreclosed Property Registry
Section 26-19
Boldface
Underlining
[Single boldface brackets]
Double underlining
[[Double boldface brackets]]
* * *
Heading or defined term.
Added to existing law by original bill.
Deletedfrom existing law by original bill.
Added by amendment.
Deletedfrom existing law or the bill by amendment.
Existing law unaffected by bill.
The County Council for Montgomery County, Maryland approves the following Act:
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BILL
No. 38-16
1
Sec. 1. Chapter 26 is amended
by
Articles I and II (Section 26-19) as
follows:
Article I. General.
2
3
4
*
*
*
5
Article
ll.
Foreclosed Property Registry.
26-19. Foreclosed Property Registry Penalty.
6
7
ill
Definitions.
In
this Section, the following words have the meanings
8
indicated:
Department
means the Department ofHousing and Community Affairs.
Director
means the Director of the Department.
Foreclosed Property Registry
means the internet-based Foreclosed
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Property Registry established Qy the State Department of Labor,
Licensing, and Regulation as required Qy Section 14-126.1 of the Real
Property Article ofthe Maryland Code.
Foreclosure purchaser
means the person identified as the purchaser on
the report of sale required Qy Maryland Rule 14-305 for
sale ofresidential property.
~
foreclosure
18
19
20
®
Registration required.
A foreclosure purchaser must submit any
required registration to the Foreclosed Property Registry as required Qy
Section 14-126.1 ofthe Real Property Article ofthe Maryland Code.
21
22
23
24
ill
Penalties.
Any
violation of this Article is
~
civil violation. The
maximum penalty for
or repeat offense.
~
violation of this Article is $1,000 for an initial
@F:\lAW\BILLS\1638 Foreclosed Property Registration Penalty\BiII1.Doc
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LEGISLATIVE REQUEST REPORT
Bill 38-16
Housing and Building Maintenance Standards
-
Foreclosed Property Registration Penalty
DESCRIPTION:
PROBLEM:
Bill 38-16 would impose a civil penalty for failure to register a
foreclosure purchase.
In
2012, the General Assembly enacted House Bill 1373, which
requires the purchaser of a foreclosed property to register with the
state. The law also authorizes local jurisdictions to impose a fme for
failing to register.
To use the authority given by the state to impose a fine for failing to
register a foreclosed property purchase.
GOALS AND
OBJECTIVES:
COORDINATION:
FISCAL IMPACT:
ECONOMIC
IMPACT:
EVALUATION:
EXPERIENCE
ELSEWHERE:
SOURCE OF
INFORMATION:
APPLICATION
WITHIN
MUNICIPALITIES:
PENALTIES:
To be requested.
To be requested.
To be requested.
To be researched.
Amanda Mihill, Legislative Attorney, 240-777-7815
To be researched.
$1,000 for failing to register.
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MONTGOMERY COUNTY COUNCIL
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND
TOM HUCKER
COUNCILMEMBER
DISTRICT 5
MEMORANDUM
TO:
FROM:
DATE:
RE:
Councilmembers
Tom Hucker
July 13,2016
Establishing a penalty for failing to register a foreclosed property
I will soon be introducing a series of housing bills that are meant to address the growing
number of neglected and vacant properties in the county. The first seeks to incentivize property
owners and banks to adhere to current law and ensure homes are properly maintained and taxes
are paid.
In 2012, at the request of Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation
(DLRR) and the Maryland Foreclosure Task Force, the General Assembly passed HB 1373 ­
Foreclosed Property Registry. The law requires the purchaser of a foreclosed property to register
with DLLR within 30 days of the property's foreclosure sale. The law also authorizes local
jurisdictions to enact legislation to impose a fine of $1,000 for failing to register. The law was
meant to address the nine to eighteen month period that frequently occurs between the date of a
foreclosure and the date that the property title is transferred. During this time, local jurisdictions
have a hard time identifying the party responsible for maintenance, security, and taxes.
To date, Montgomery County has not enacted any punitive fine and hundreds of.
foreclosed properties have gone unregistered. Based on the data from the State Foreclosure
Registry, there were 1,432 foreclosures countywide in FYI5. Ofthese, 34% (492) either failed to
register or registered long after the deadline. These unregistered properties are much more likely
to go unmaintained costing the county thousands in housing code enforcement and dragging
down nearby property values.
[II
In addition, many purchasers - often banks and out-of-state investors - wait to record the
deed to the property until it is resold to another purchaser)!) By circumventing the normal
process and improperly (and illegally) transferring the property to a new homeowner in this
fashion, the County does not receive the recordation tax or the transfer tax, which shortchanges
County coffers of over $6,000 in revenue for a property of average value.
That is why I am introducing legislation to enact a penalty of$I,OOO per day for a
foreclosed property that has not been registered. This deterrent is critically needed when
[1
]https:1
Iwww.richmondfed.orgl-/medialrichmondfedorglconferences_and_ events/community_ developmentl20
121
pdflmdJoreclosure_task_force_rpt.pdf
®
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foreclosed property owners can save many thousands of dollars in maintenance costs and taxes
by refusing to register and transfer ownership of their properties. These properties, often are in
persistent disrepair, hurt neighborhoods and force the County to expend resources to enforce
code violations. This bill gives us another 'stick' we can use to address this problem.
Attached is a copy of this bill and an FAQ sheet. I hope you will join me in cosponsoring
this legislation. Please let me know ifI can provide any additional information.
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Foreclosure Registry
Frequently Asked Questions
1. What is the Maryland Foreclosed Property Registry?
The Foreclosed Property Registry is an online system managed by the Office of the
Commissioner of Financial Regulation in the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing
and Regulation (DLLR). State law requires that every residential property purchased at a
foreclosure sale be registered in this system.
2. What is the purpose of the foreclosure registry?
In 2012, the Maryland Foreclosure Task Force identified a limbo period of nine to
eighteen months between the property's foreclosure sale and the deed recordation in the
public land records. During this limbo period, it is difficult for jurisdictions to identify the
party responsible for foreclosed property, which often causes the property to fall into
disrepair. The Foreclosed Property Registry closes this gap by creating one centralized
database of information.
3. What causes this limbo period?
According to the Foreclosure Task Force, this limbo period is caused by the following six
factors:
Right of property owner to challenge the foreclosure auction
Time required for Courts to ratify the foreclosure sale
Clearing of any priority government liens against the property
Lengthy eviction proceedings or eviction requirements
Market demand or lack thereof for the property by a new homeowner; and
Whether or not foreclosure purchasers record the deed prior to resale, or in the
alternative, wait to record upon resale to a third-party purchaser.
4. Why would a foreclosure purchaser wait to record a deed upon resale?
By postponing the deed recordation, a foreclosure purchaser can avoid paying thousands
of dollars in transfer and recordation taxes, which become the responsibility of the
third-party purchaser.
5. How much are property transfer and recordation taxes?
Transfer taxes are generally 1
%
of the value of the improved (building) and unimproved
(land) value of a property transferred to a new owner. Recordation taxes are 0.69% ofthe
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amount of the transaction. In Montgomery County, the recordation and transfer tax for a
property of median value in Montgomery County is about $6,600. The foreclosure
purchaser avoids paying these taxes, and often passes the costs on to the next person who
purchases the property.
6. What is a foreclosure sale?
In Maryland, a lender may file for foreclosure on a property 45 days after the first missed
mortgage payment. If the loan is not brought current or the loan is not modified, then the
lender can sell the property at a foreclosure sale. Typically, loans sold at foreclosure are
bought by other banks or real estate investors.
7. Who has to register the property?
The company or individual that purchases the foreclosed property is required to register
the property. The property does not need to be re-registered when the foreclosure
purchaser sells the property to a third-party purchaser.
8. What is the process for registering a property?
Purchasers are required to submit an initial registration of the property within 30 days of
the foreclosure sale, which includes the name, address, and telephone number of the
purchaser, their legal representative,property maintenance company, and the property's
occupancy status. The purchaser is also required to complete a final registration within 30
days of recording the property's new deed.
9. How is compliance enforced?
The statute that created the registry gives local jurisdictions the authority to enforce
compliance. A jurisdiction may enact a local law that imposes a civil penalty for failure
to register a property.
10. What is the noncompliance rate?
DLLR estimates that 20% of foreclosure purchasers do not register their property or
register after the deadline. In Montgomery County, however, that number is much higher.
In FY15, there were 1,432 foreclosures in the county, and 34% either failed to register or
were registered after the deadline.
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MEMORANDUM
October 10, 2016
FROM:
Jennifer A.
Hughe~ir~.c.
' ffice of Management and Budget
Alexandre A.
Esp~~
ctor. Department of Finance
SUBJECT:
FEIS
for
Bill 38-16, Housing and Building
Maintenan~e
Standards .... Foreclosed Property
Registration Penalty; and
Bill 39-16, Housing and Building Maintenanc.ti;Standards .... Registration of
Vacant Property
r~lbenced
Please find attached the fiscal and economic impact statements
for
the above­
legislations .
.lAH:fz
t:c; Bonnie Kirkland,
Assistant Chief Adlninistrative
Officer
Lisa Austin. Offices of the County Executive
Joy Nurmi, Special
Assistarit
to
the County Executive
Patrick Lacefield.
Director, Public Information
Office
Clar0I1Ce
J. Snuggs, Director, Department of Housing and Community Affairs
David Platt,
Department
of
Finance
Dennis Hetman. Department of Finance
Pofcn Salem, Office of Management and Budget
Na{~em
Mia.
Office
of
Management and Budget
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Fiscal Impact Statement
BiU38-16
Housing and Building Maintenance Standards - Foreclosed Property Registration Penalty
1.
Legislative Summary
The proposed legislation would impose a civil penalty for failure to register a foreclosure
purchase. Bill 38-16 would enact the County's authority referenced in HB-1373 which
requires every residential property pUrchased at a foreclosure sale
to
be
registered within
30 days into the Foreclosed Property Registry. HB-1373 authorizes local jurisdictions to
impose a fine of$l,OOO for failing to register. State law was intended to address a limbo
period of nine to eighteen months between the property's foreclosure sale and the deed
recordation in the public 1and records. During this limbo period, it is difficult for local
jurisdictions
to
identify the party responsible for maintenance. security. and taxes of
foreclosed property. The Foreclosed Property Registryis designed to close this gap by
creating one centralized database of infonnation.
2. An estimate of changes In County revenues and expenditures regardless of whether the
revenues or eX1?enditures are assumed in the recommended or approved budget. Includes
source of information, assumptions, and methodologies used.
The Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation (DLLR) estimates
that
twenty percent offoreclosure purchaserS do noi register properties or register after the
deadline, and that number is much higher
in
Montgomery County. According to the
"Foreclosure Registry Frequently Asked Questions", which was submitted in the
introduction package for Bill 38-16, there were 1,432 foreclosures countywide in FY15.
Of
these, 34% (492 properties) either failed to register or were registered after the
deadline. Bill 38..16 would impose a maximum penalty of$1 ,000 for noncompliance.
Therefore, assuming the aforementioned 492 properties,. this would generate an additional
$492,000 in revenue. However, the intent of the bill is to increase the compliance rate.
Therefore, the revenueS could be less.
DHCA currently does not perfOllIl the billing and full compliance of foreclosed
properties to be registered in the Foreclosed Property Registry. DHCA administers the
Clean and Lien Program, a similar program, aimed at enforcing code compliance at
certain noncompliant ownership properties. The Clean and Lien program utilizes a
Program Manager] position
to
maintain 200·250 properties per year. DHCA estimates
Bill 38-16 could require the same level of effort with one additional staff
to
enforce code
compliance at those noncompliant foreclosed properties. DHCA estimates that the
total
personnel cost, including fringe benefits, for a Program Manager I position is $95,165.
The compliance rate
'Will
be monitored to determine
if
the additional staffing is necessary.
3. Revenue and expenditure estimates covering at least the next 6 fiscal years,
The total estimated six-year revenue or expenditure is based on the assumption of
. approximately 492 foreclosed properties remain noncornpliantper year:
I
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FY17
t
FY18
FY19
FY20
FY21
FYZ2
Total
I
Revenue
(@$l,OOO
penalty per
property)
..-
492,000 492,000 492,000 492,000 492,000 492,000 2,952,000
.............-.---..-......- ...".-.. _ 1-.-.----..-1--..--­
!
Expenditure
1
~
I
(1.0 FTEfor
!
Program
I
Manager
I)
95,165
570~993
95,1651 95,165
I
95,165
95,165\ 95,165
Note: The percentage ofnoncomplIance foreclosed properties
in
Montgomery County is hlgher than the
State average (20"Aj. The revenue estimates are based on the assumption
(if
34%
ofidentified foreclosed
properties in FYi5. Personnell....ost does not include fuJure wage increases.
I
I
I
4. An actuarial analysis through the entire amortization period for each bill
that
would affect
retiree pension or group insurance costs.
Not Applicable.
5. An estimate ofexpenditures related to County's information technology (IT) systems,
including Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems.
Not applicable.
6. Later actions that may affect future revenue and expel1ditures ifthe bill authorizes future
spending.
Not applicable; the proposed legislation does not authorize
future
spending.
7.
An
estimate of the staff time needed to implement the bill.
As mentioned in
#2;
DHCA currently does not perform this
task.
DHCA administers the
Clean and Lien Program, a similar program, aimed at enforcing code compliance at
certain noncompliant ownership properties. The Clean and Lien program utilizes a
Program Manager I position to maintain
200-250
properties per year. DHCA estimates
Bill 38-16 could require the same level of effort,
ifthe
non-compliance rate isn't
significantly reduced. with one additional staff
to
enforce code compliance
at
those
noncompliant foreclosed properties. DHCA estimates
that
the
total
personnel cost,
including fringe benefits, for a Program Manager I position is
$95,165.
8.
An
explanation of how the addition of new staff responsibilitit..'S would affect other duties.
The proposed task cannot be absorbed
with
current
staff
and would require an additional
1.0 FTE.
9. An estimate ofcosts when an additional appropriation is needed.
2
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An additional appropriation
Qf$95,165
for a Program Manager
1
position could
be
necessary if compliance rates remain unchanged.
10. A
description of
any
variable that could affect revenue and cost estimates.
The revenue estimates could be affected by the number of foreclosure events in a given
fiscal year, the uncertainty of whether the
$1,000 penalty
for noncompliance
is
challenged and upheld in court, and whether the legislation's goal of increasing
compliance is achieved.
11.
Ranges ofrevenue or expenditures that
are
uncertain or difficult
to
project.
Not applicable.
12. If a bill is likely to have no fiscal impact, why that is the case.
Not applicable.
13.
Other fiscal impacts or comments.
Not applicable.
14. The following contributed to and concurred
with
this analysis:
Clarence Snuggs, DHCA
Tim Goetzinger, DHCA
Chris
Anderson,
DHCA
Dan, McHugh,
DHCA
Pofen Salem, Office of Management and Budget
JO(61(~
Date
3
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Econolllic
lmp~ct
Sutement
Bill 38-16,
Housmg
and
Building
Maintenance
Standards-,For~dosedProperty
Registration Penalty
Background:
This legislation would impose a civil penalty for failure to register a foreclosure purchase. In
2012,
the
General
Ass(;..~bly
enacted
House
Bill
B73that
requires the
purchaser
ofa foreclosed
property to register
~ith
the state and authorizes local jurisdictions
to
imptlse
a fine
for failing to
regi~ier.
1. The sources of information, assumptions, and methodologies used.
Sources of infomlation include the Maryland Department ofHousing and Community
Development (DRCD), RealtyTrac;
and
the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and
Regulation (DLLR). The Department
of
Finance (Finance) did not develop assumptions or
methodologies in
the
preparation ofthe economic impaCt statement.
According to DHCD in
its
report "Property Foreclosures in Maryland; Third Quarter2015",
there were 943 property foreclosure events or foreclosure filings in Montgomery County
which
represented
8.7
percent of the total statewide events. Those
event..:;
included notices of
default
(313),
notices of sales (412), and lender purchast.-s (291). The sum of the three events
exceeds the number of total foreclosure filings because DHCD eliminates multiple counting
of events from the total. The total foreclosure filings during the third quarter of 2015 was 6,4
percent above
the
rate during the third quarter of2014.
addresses the issue ofthe
failure
by
purchasers of foreclosed property to register
the property or failure to register after the deadline with
the
DLLR's Fort'Closed Property
Registry (Registry). According to data provided
by
the Registry, 492 properties :tailed to
register or registered
after the
deadline in
FY15. Bill 38-15
would impose
a
maximum
penalty or flne of $1.000 for each
failure
to register or registered after the deadline.
Therefore, the maximum total cost to purchasers offoreclosed property would be $492,000.
2. A description of any variable that could affect the economic impact estimates.
Bi1l38~
16
'The purpose of the economic impact statement is not to analyze the economic impact of
foreclosures on the County's economy but the economic impact attributed to imposing a finc
for purchasers who failed to regisK.'f and registered
after
the deadline.
As
SUell,
the variable
that could impact the County's economy is the number of properties that failed
to
register
and the
an10unt
of the
fmc per
noncompliance.
3. The Bill's positive or negative effect,
if
any on
employment~
spending, savings,
investment, incomes, and property values in the County.
Based
on data
provided
in
paragraph
1, Bill 38-16
would have a modest impact on
the
incomes of purchasers of fort'Closed property who fail
to
register or failed to meet the
deadline.
The
legislation would not have a significant impact on the overall economy.
Page 1
of2
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Economic Impact Statement
Bill 38-16, Housing and Building Maintenance Standards -Foreclosed Property
R.egistration Penalty
4.
If
a
Bill
is
likely
to
have
no economic impact, why
is
that the case?
See #3
5. The following wntributed to or concurred with this analysis:
David
Platt,
Dennis
Hetman, and Robert Hagedoorn, Finance.
-,-.~-.~
Alexandre A. Espinosa, Din.x:tor
Department of Finance
Page 2 of2
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§
14-126.1. Internet-based Foreclosed Property Registry, MD REAL PROP
§
14-126.1
West's Annotated Code of Maryland
Real Property (Refs
&
Annos)
Title
14.
Miscellaneous Rules (Refs
&
Annos)
Subtitle
1.
Miscellaneous Rules
MD Code, Real Property,
§
14-126.1
§
14-126.1.
Internet-based Foreclosed Property Registry
Effective: October
1, 2014
Currentness
Defmitions
(a)(l) In this section the following words have the meanings indicated.
(2) "Department" means the Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation.
(3) "Foreclosed Property Registry" means the Foreclosed Property Registry established by the Department under
subsection (b) of this section.
(4) "Foreclosure purchaser" means the person identified as the purchaser on the report of sale required by Maryland
Rule 14-305 for a foreclosure sale of residential property.
(5) "Fund" means the Foreclosed Property Registry Fund established by the Department under subsection (i) of this
section.
(6) "Local jurisdiction" means:
(i) A county; or
(ii) A municipal corporation.
(7) "Residential property" means real property improved by four or fewer dwelling units that are designed principally
and are intended for human habitation.
Registry for information relating to foreclosure sales of residential property
(b) The Department shall establish and maintain an Internet-based Foreclosed Property Registry for information relating
to foreclosure sales of residential property.
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§
14-126.1. Internet-based Foreclosed Property Registry, MD REAL PROP
§
14-126.1
Written acknowledgment of section requirements
(c) At the time of a foreclosure sale of residential property, the person responsible for conducting the foreclosure shall
obtain from the foreclosure purchaser a written acknowledgment of the requirements of this section.
Initial registration to Registry
(d)(l) Within 30 days after a foreclosure sale of residential property, a foreclosure purchaser shall submit an initial
registration to the Foreclosed Property Registry.
(2) The initial registration shall:
(i) Be in the form the Department requires; and
(ii) Contain the following information:
1. The name, telephone number, and address of the foreclosure purchaser;
2. The street address of the property that is the subject of the foreclosure sale;
3. The date of the foreclosure sale;
4. Whether the property is a single-family or multifamily property;
5. The name and address of the person, including a substitute purchaser, who is authorized to accept legal service
for the foreclosure purchaser;
6. To the best of the foreclosure purchaser's knowledge at the time of registration:
A. Whether the residential property is vacant; and
B.
The name, telephone number, and street address of the person who is responsible for the maintenance of
the property; and
7. Whether the foreclosure purchaser has possession of the property.
(3) Within 30 days after a deed transferring title to the residential property has been recorded, the foreclosure purchaser
shall submit a final registration to the Foreclosed Property Registry.
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§
14-126.1. Internet-based Foreclosed Property Registry, MD REAL PROP
§
14-126.1
(4) The final registration shall:
(i) Be in the form the Department requires; and
(ii) Contain the following information as of the date of final registration:
1. The name, telephone number, and address of the owner on the deed;
2. The date of the ratification ofthe sale; and
3. The date the deed was recorded.
Filing fees for registration
(e)(1) The filing fees for registering a residential property are:
(i) $50 for an initial registration
fIled
within the time period required under subsection (d)(l) of this section; and
(ii) $100 for an initial registration filed after the time period required under subsection (d)(1) of this section.
(2) There is no fee for a final registration.
(3) A filing fee paid under paragraph (1) of this subsection is nonrefundable.
(4) A local jurisdiction may enact a local law that imposes a civil penalty for failure to register under this section in
an amount not exceeding $1,000.
Abatement of nuisance on registered property
(f)(1) Subject to paragraph (2) of this subsection, a local jurisdiction that, in accordance with any applicable building code
or local ordinance, abates a nuisance on a residential property registered under this section or takes action to maintain
a residential property registered under this section may collect the cost associated with the abatement or other action as
a charge included on the residential property's property tax bill.
(2)(i) The cost associated with an abatement or other action taken under paragraph (1) of this subsection may not
be included as a charge on the residential property's property tax bill unless the local jurisdiction provides advance
written notice in accordance with subparagraph (ii) of this paragraph to:
I. The person identified in the registry who is authorized to accept legal service for the foreclosure purchaser;
and~
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§
14-126.1. Internet-based Foreclosed Property Registry, MD REAL PROP
§
14-126.1
2. The person identified in the registry who is responsible for the maintenance of the property.
(ii) The notice described in subparagraph (i) of this paragraph shall:
1. Describe the intended abatement or other action the local jurisdiction intends to take; and
2.
Be provided:
A.
In accordance with the notice provisions of the applicable building code or local ordinance; or
B. If the applicable building code or local ordinance does not provide for notice, at least
30
days before the
local jurisdiction abates the nuisance or takes action to maintain the property.
Access to Foreclosed Property Registry
(g)(1) The Foreclosed Property Registry:
(i) Is not a public record as defined by
§
4-101 of the General Provisions Articie; and
(ii) Is not subject to Title 4 of the General Provisions Article.
(2) The Department may authorize access to the Foreclosed Property Registry only to local jurisdictions, their agencies,
and representatives and State agencies.
(3) Notwithstanding paragraphs (1) and
(2)
of this subsection, the Department or a local jurisdiction may provide
i~formation
for a specific property
in
the Foreclosed Property Registry to:
(i) A person who owns property on the same block; or
(ii)
A homeowners association or condominium in which the property is located.
Revenue from filing fees distributed to Fund
(h) Revenue collected from the filing fees required under subsection (e)(1) of this section shall be distributed to the Fund.
Foreclosed Property Registry Fund
(i)(1) There is a Foreclosed Property Registry Fund in the Department.
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§
14-126.1. Internet-based Foreclosed Property Registry, MD REAL PROP
§
14-126.1
(2) The purpose of the Fund is to support the development, administration, and maintenance of the Foreclosed
Property Registry established under this section.
(3) The Department shall administer the Fund.
(4)(i) The Fund is a special, nonlapsingfund that is not subject to
§
7-302 of
the
State Finance and Procurement Article.
(ii) The State Treasurer shall hold the Fund separately, and the Comptroller shall account for the Fund.
(5) The Fund consists of:
(i) Revenue distributed to the Fund under subsection (h) of this section;
(ii) Investment earnings of the Fund;
(iii) Money appropriated in the State budget to the Fund; and
(iv) Any other money from any other source accepted for the benefit of the Fund.
(6)(i) The State Treasurer shall invest the money of the Fund in the same manner as other State money may be invested.
(ii) Any investment earnings of the Fund shall be paid into the Fund.
Laws requiring notice
(j)(l)
Except as provided in paragraph (2) of this subsection, only the State may enact a law requiring a notice to be filed
with a unit of government to register residential properties that are subject to foreclosure.
(2) This subsection does not restrict or otherwise affect the ability of a unit of government to require a registration
or notice to be filed for a purpose other than one relating to foreclosure, even
if
a property to be identified in the
registration or notice is subject to foreclosure.
Credits
Added by Acts 2012, c. 155,
§
1, eff. Oct. 1,2012. Amended by Acts 2014, c. 104, § 2, eff. Oct. 1,2014.
MD Code, Real Property,
§
14-126.1, MD REAL PROP
§
14-126.1
Current through Chapter 2 from the 2017 Regular Session of the General Assembly
-"'
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§
14-126.1. Internet-based Foreclosed Property Registry, MD REAL PROP
§
14-126.1
End of Docllment
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Montgomery County Council Public Hearing
Bill38-16: Housing and Building Maintenance Standards­
Foreclosed Property Registration Penalty
Bill39:16: Housing and Building Maintenance Standards ­
Registration of Vacant Property
Tuesday, November 1,2016
Vicki Vergagni
President, Board of Directors and
On-Site Community Manager
Glen Waye Gardens Condominium
Bill 38-16: Opposed
Bill39:16: Opposed
My name is Vicki Vergagni. I represent both myself and 214 master-metered
condominium units in Glen Waye Gardens. My positions on the two aforementioned bills are
based on 40+ years of owning and living in a condominium, 16 years of leading my community
as the Board president and serving as its on-site manager, and five years of serving as a
Commissioner on the County's CCOC - with two years as Vice Chair. As the representative of
my community and as an individual, we are opposed to the two aforementioned bills.
Bill 38-16 that penalizes entities for failing to register in the State's Foreclosure Registry
foreclosed properties that they have purchased is unclear.
In
one portion of the bills' documentation, the total penalty is $1,000. This is
inappropriate as transfer taxes average $6,000 per property, so there is a net savings
of$5,000 if the property does not get registered and is simply transferred from a
lender's foreclosure stock to a new individual owner.
In another portion of the bill's documentation, the penalty is $1,000 per day. This is
draconian at best and would most likely ensnare individuals who are making their
one-and-only purchase at a foreclosure sale.
Thus, we cannot support Bill 38-16.
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Hillandale Citizens Association, Inc.
Montgomery County Bills 38-16
&
39-16
Penalty for Not Registering Foreclosed Properties
&
Listing Vacant Properties
The Executive Committee of the Hillandale Citizens Association supports
Councilmember Hucker's two bills crafted to improve the Department of Housing and
Community Affairs (DHCA) management of vacant properties. We ask that Council also
consider the following:
• Add a time requirement for final registration with the State Foreclosure Registry
• Add a provision to have DHCA list designated unmaintained, vacant properties on their web
site, as they do condemned properties
• Remove the two-year grace period for listing properties in foreclosure action from the
unmaintained, vacant property designation
Bill 38-16 --- Enacting the State's Foreclosure Registry Penalty Provision in MoCo
Requiring the purchaser of a foreclosed property to promptly report their purchase to the
state's foreclosed property database will improve DHCA's ability to identify responsible
parties. Imposing a $1,000 fine will encourage buyers to act quickly and acknowledge their
ownership with the
initial
registration.
Unfortunately, the bill stops short of requiring
thefinal
registration and actual deed
transfer be done quickly following the court's ratification of a foreclosure sale. Please make this
a requirement.
Bill 39-16 - New Blight-Reduction Tool: Unmaintained Vacant Residential Property List
Establishing and implementing aMoCo
unmaintained vacant residential property
list
with an annual inspection requirement and fees will help DHCA to address all types of
abandoned properties that drag down a neighborhood. Since many of these properties will not
have voluntary registration, it is imperative that DHCA aggressively uses the authority provided
in this bill to add qualifying properties to the list. Furthermore, having inspection fees escalate
within the service request/complaint system may encourage absentee owners to consider selling
or renovating the home. We ask that this list be published on DHCA's web site.
Unfortunately, the more critical vacant, abandoned, unmaintained homes in Hillandale
have been lengthy, stalled, or unprosecuted foreclosures. These have not been contested
foreclosures for the most part. Some cases have been dismissed due to inactivity, then restarted
or refiled. With this experience, the 24-month grace provision in the legislation is too
lenient. All vacant and unmaintained homes should be treated equally based on the condition of
the property. These properties need to be inspected, with registration charges and fees being
added to the
tax
bill. Mortgage companies routinely pay the tax bills to avoid the possibility of a
tax sale. Please remember that the negative impact of these homes on surrounding properties is
significant and action must not be delayed.
We also encourage Council to review with DHCA the Department's policies regarding
their existing powers to enforce housing code standards, including their ultimate tool, requiring a
property owner to "repair or remove" a deteriorated, vacant dwelling through the District Court
process. Several years ago, this approach was used in Hillandale with two successful
:+
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outcomes. One home was sold and renovated while another was demolished. This is a tool in
their tool box that needs to be carefully used when necessary.
Thank you for considering our input as Council reviews and adopts Bills 38-16 and 39­
16.
Margie Goergen-Rood, President
Eileen Finnegan, Zoning and Planning
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\~
Woody Brosnan
Representing PREZCO, the Presidents' Council of Silver Spring Civic Associations
Re: Bill 38-16
Honorable Councilmembers,
I will reserve most of my comments for Bill 39-16, but the two bills work hand in
hand. It makes little sense to have a system for enforcing the maintenance of
vacant properties if you can't make the owners register the properties in the first
place. This must have been contemplated by legislators when they added
permissive language for the $1,000 fine.
This bill is supported by civic associations representing the Indian Springs, Long
Branch, Lyttonsville, North Hills of Sligo, North Woodside, Rosemary Hills, Seven
Oaks-Evanswood, Woodmoor-Pinecrest, Woodside, Woodside Forest and
Woodside Park neighborhoods.
9101 Louis Avenue
Silver Spring, Md. 20910
301-588-0025
woodybrosnan@verizon.net
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Ms. Nancy Floreen
President
Montgomery County Council
100 Maryland Avenue
Rockville, Maryland 20850
Re: Bill No. 38-16, Housing and Building Maintenance Standards
Foreclosed Property Registration
SUPPORT WITH AMENDMENTS
Dear Ms. Floreen:
The Washington Metro Chapter of the Community Associations Institute (WMCCAI) supports Bill No. 38­
16 which is intended to encourage purchasers of foreclosed residential property in Montgomery County
to register the property with the Foreclosed Property Registry administered by the Maryland
Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation (DLLR), as required by Section 14-126.1 of the Real
Property Article of the
1\11
a ryland Code, by making failure to register a civil violation of the Montgomery
County Code.
WMCCAI members include the volunteer leaders of condominiums, homeowners associations, and
housing co-operatives in Montgomery County and throughout the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area;
WMCCAI members also include management companies, attorneys, accountants and other service
providers who assist these associations in operating their communities.
Prompt registration with the DLLR Foreclosed Property Registry is important for the Montgomery
County Department of Housing and Community Affairs (DHCA) and condominiums and homeowners
associations because the registration information required includes the contact information for the
purchaser and for the person who is responsible for maintaining the property after a foreclosure sale.
Once a property is registered, the County will more easily be able to notify those persons of any
required maintenance and housing code violations.
Access to this information by condominiums and homeowner associations will similarly allow these
associations to notify the owner regarding maintenance and repair violations of the association
covenants and the obligation to pay assessments to the association. Section 14-126.1(g) allows, but
does not require, a local jurisdiction to provide the information in the DLLR Foreclosed Property Registry
to a person who owns property on the same block as the foreclosed property and to condominiums and
homeowner associations where the property is located.
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WMCCAI proposes an amendment to Bill No. 38-16 which would require DHCA to provide the
information in the Foreclosed Property Registry to a person who owns property on the same block as
the foreclosed property and to condominiums and homeowner associations where the property is
located. The text ofthis suggested amendment is enclosed.
Thank you for considering our comments. For questions or additional information, you may reach me by
email atmitch@mlfarrahproperties.com.
Sincerely,
Mitch Farrah, Chair
WMCCAI Maryland Legislative Committee
Enclosure
Cc: Mr. Thomas Hucker w/enc. via email (councilmember.hucker@montgomerycountymd.gov
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Proposed Amendment to Montgomery County Bill No. 38-16
Housing and Building Maintenance Standards, Foreclosed Property
Section 26-19 is amended by adding the following subsection (d):
(d)
Registration Information.
The Director shall provide information for a specific property in the
Foreclosed Property Registry, upon written request, to
(i)
a person who owns property on the same
block and
(ij)
a homeowners association or condominium in which the property is located, as permitted
by Section 14-126.1(g) of the Real Property Article of the Maryland Code.
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Bill 38-16, Housing and Building Maintenance Standards - Foreclosed Property Registration Penalty
Testimony by: Carolyn Thompson 11/1/2016
I'm concerned that individual home owners of record and home owner associations are shouldering the
bill for buyers of foreclosed properties, after they have purchased the property, because they've failed
to record the purchase.
The buyer should be required to file their purchase through the registry within two business days of
purchase.
The fee for failure to register the sale should be $1,000 per month, with $100.00 or less of this fee going
administering the penalty. The remaining funds should go to the association to be reimbursed the non­
payment. Any excess offunds, over and above the outstanding association fees will remain with the
association to help offset the cost of deferred maintenance.