HHS/GO
ITEM 3
June 23, 2016
Worksession
MEMORANDUM
June 21, 2016
TO:
Health and Human Services Committee
Government Operations and Fiscal Policy Committee
Amanda Mihill, Legislative
AttorneYG,f~t(I
Linda McMillan, Senior Legislative
Analyst~~~V
Worksession: Bill 19-16, Health and Sanitation - Strategic Plan to End Food
Insecurity
FROM:
SUBJECT:
Bill 19-16, Health and Sanitation Strategic Plan to End Food Insecurity, sponsored by Lead
Sponsor Council Vice President Berliner and Co-Sponsors Councihnembers Leventhal, Rice Hucker,
Navarro, EIrich, and Katz, Council President Floreen, and Councihnember Riemer, was introduced
on April 19, 2016. A public hearing was held on June 14 (see a statement from the County
Executive on ©18-19 and select written correspondence on ©20-SS).
Bill 19-16 would require the Chief Innovation Officer to propose and update a Strategic Plan to
End Food Insecurity in Montgomery County. In developing the Strategic Plan, the CIO would be
required to consult
with
many organizations inside and outside of County government. The
Strategic Plan would include relevant demographic and geographic information on poverty and
food insecurity and would also include a S-year Plan that strives
to
reduce food insecurity by at
least 10% each year. A memorandum from the Lead Sponsor begins on ©S.
Issues for Committee Discussion
1. Should Bill
19-16
be renamed?
Manna Food Center (©37) and Shepherd's table (©S2)
recommended the Council change the name of Bill 19-16 to ''the Food Security Bill". The goal
being to achieve food security for all residents, rather than focusing on food insecurity. Lead
Sponsor Berliner indicated his support for changing the name.
Council staff supports the goal behind this recommendation and suggests that changing beyond
the name of the bill to also changing the name of the plan. Council staff recommends renaming
the Strategic Plan
to
"Strategic Plan to Achieve Food Security in Montgomery County." If the
Committee agrees with this change, all references to the name of the Plan would be updated.
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In addition, rather than change the short title ofthe Bill, which is currently "Health and Sanitation
- Strategic Plan to End Food Insecurity", the "name" of the law can be changed by adding at ©3,
line 49 the following:
un
This Section is known M the Montgomery County Food Security Bill.
2. Who should develop the Strategic Plan?
Bill 19-16 assigns the creation of the Strategic Plan
and annual updates to the ChiefInnovation Officer. The statement on © 19 notes that the Executive
does not object to the Chief Innovation Officer developing the Strategic Plan, but that once it is
developed, it may be more appropriate to assign implementation of the Plan to the Department of
Health and Hurnap Services. Council staffis comfortable with this and therefore suggests replacing
"Chief Innovation Office" with "County Executive" throughout the bill.
3. Who should the ChiefInnovation Office be required to consult with?
Bill 19-16 would require
the Chief Innovation Office to develop a Strategic Plan to End Food Insecurity and in developing
this plan, consult with a wide variety ofstakeholders, which are listed on
©
2-3, lines 25-39. Manna
Food Center and others recommended that the individuals who have experience with food
insecurity be added to the list of stakeholders that the CIO must consult with (©36).
Council staff supports this addition to the bill, but notes that the list included in Bill 19-16 are
simply the stakeholders that the CIO must consult with; the CIO remains free to consult with any
additional stakeholders even if they are not specified in the legislation. Council staff
recommendation: add the following to ©3, line 36:
individuals who have experience with food insecurity;
4. How should the Strategic Plan relate to other efforts to endfood insecurity?
Several speakers
at the hearing spoke about how the Strategic Plan would relate to other broader efforts to end
hunger. Manna Food Center, for instance, recommended that the Plan be tied to global and national
efforts to end hunger (©37). Women Who Care Ministries urged thorough research and review of
best practices of other jurisdictions (©54). Maryland Hunger Solutions also underscored this issue
(©39-40).
Council staff concurs that the CIO should be mindful of other efforts -locally, nationally, and
globally - that have been undertaken to address food insecurity and use information gleaned, as
well as best practices in other jurisdictions, in developing the Plan. However, Council staff does
not believe it is necessary to add language to the bill as fact finding about best practices and
practices of other jurisdictions is generally a part of a planning process such as this. Language
could be added ifthe Chief Innovation Officer believes it is needed to address the tasks he is being
asked to complete.
5. Should the Strategic Plan have a non-profit "co-owner"?
Manna Food Center (©37),
Crossroads Community Food Network (©26), Montgomery County Coalition for the Homeless
(©41) and others urge the Council to amend Bill 19-16 to include a non-profit co-owner. Council
staff believes that it is premature to require the Strategic Plan to have a non-profit co-owner. This
is a different question than whether implementation ofthe Strategic Plan should have a lead agency
2
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or lead non-profit partner. Council staff believes that the answer
to
this question will become
clearer during the Strategic Plan development. This is also a different question; than is addressed
later, about the need for a contractor(s) to assist with Plan development.
6. How should the Strategic Plan relate to broader anti-poverty efforts?
Manna Food Center
(©37), Crossroads Community Food Network (©26), and others urged the Council to require that
all goals, objectives; and accountability measures relate to and support broader anti-poverty efforts
in the County. Women Who Care Ministries also urged that Bill 19-16 include focus on
understanding why eligible families are not participating in the SNAP program as well as
providing an emphasis on client participation and responsibility (©55).
The bill as drafted call for inclusion of demographic and geographic information about poverty,
participation in SNAP, WIC, FARMS, and other food programs, as well as access to transportation
and food literacy. While none of these specifically asks for a discussion of the root causes of
poverty, developing this information and discussion the solutions to what is found is most likely
to address as least some of the root causes of poverty that lead to food insecurity. Council staff is
concerned that adding too much language about poverty in general, while important, could cause
the focus to move away from specifically addressing food security and food access.
7. What should the targetfood insecurity reduction be?
Bill 19-16 requires the Strategic Plan to
include a 5-year Plan that "strives" to reduce food insecurity by at least 10% each year, or 50%
over the five years ofthe Strategic Plan (see ©2, lines 18-23). Several speakers suggested different
targets. The Capital Area Food Bank described this target as ambitious and suggested that a
specific goal should be identified after the Strategic Plan is developed (©21). Shepherd's Table
described this target as "fall[ing] short of the vision needed to end food insecurity" and seemed to
suggest a 100% reduction target (©52). In his statement, the County Executive noted his belief
that it is premature to put the specific target in the legislation, though noting his intention that the
Strategic Plan will have measurable goals (©19).
The legislation does not have to include specific measurable targets, but doing so does create a
framework for measurable progress. The question is whether the sponsors feel that the Plan must
present options around the 10% reduction or whether this constrains the Plan development too
much. For example, if there is a change in organizational infrastructure that needs to occur in a
given year that might not cause a substantial reduction in food insecurity until a subsequent year.
8. What
is
theflScal impactofBiU
19-16?
In
a written statement, the County Executive stated that
additional resources would
be
necessary to implement Bill 19-16 (©19). The fiscal impact and
economic impact statements prepared by the Office of Management and Budget and the
Department of Finance, indicate that the Chief Innovation Officer would require $75,000 for
consultants (© 15).
Creation of this Strategic Plan will require dedicated staff time for research and for convening the
planning partners. Council staff agrees that the Chief Innovation Officer should have additional
resources if the Strategic Plan is to be completed by December I. While the Council can adopt
the bill without funding, Council staff suggests the
HHS/GO
Committees consider sponsoring a
special appropriation of $75,000. If the Committees agree to do so atthis worksession, it could be
3
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prepared for introduction on July 19
th ,
which would be the week after this bill is scheduled for
action. A public hearing and action on the appropriation could then be scheduled for August 2
nd
so that approval could occur before the Council recess.
This packet contains:
Bil119-16
Legislative Request Report
Sponsor memorandum
Fiscal and Economic Impact Statements
Select Written Correspondence
County Executive Statement
Montgomery County Board of Education
Capital Area Food Bank Maryland Regional Team
Community Action Board
Crossroads Community Food Network
Growing Soul
IONA
Interfaith Works
Jews United for Justice
Manna Food Center
Maryland Hunger Solutions
Montgomery County Coalition for the Homeless
Montgomery County Food Council
Montgomery County Food Security Collaborative
Nonprofit Montgomery
Nourish Now
Shepherd's Table
Women Who Care Ministries
Circle
#
1
4
5
15
18
20
21
23
26
27
30
32
33
35
39
41
43
45
47
49
50
54
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Bill No.
19 -16
Concerning: Health and Sanitation ­
Strategic Plan to End Food Insecurity
Revised: 4115/2016 Draft No.
4
Introduced:
April 19, 2016
Expires:
October 19, 2017
Enacted: _ _ _ _ _ _ _­ _ _
Executive: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Effective: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Sunset Date: _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Ch, _ _, Laws of Mont. Co. _ __
COUNTY COUNCIL
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND
Lead Sponsor: Vice President Berliner
Co-Sponsors: Councilmembers Leventhal, Rice, Hucker, Navarro, EIrich and Katz,
Council President Floreen, and Councilmember Riemer
AN
ACT to:
(1)
(2)
require the Chief Innovation Officer to propose and update a Strategic Plan to End
Food Insecurity in Montgomery County;
generally amend County laws related to Health and Sanitation.
By adding
Montgomery County Code
Chapter 24, Health and Sanitation
Section 24-8B
Boldface
Underlining
[Single boldface brackets]
Double underlining
[[Double boldface bracketsD
* * *
Heading or defined term.
Added to existing law by original bill.
Deletedfrom existing law by original bill.
Added by amendment.
Deletedfrom existing law or the bill by amendment.
Existing law unaffected by bill.
The County Council for Montgomery County, Maryland approves the following Act:
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BILL
No. 19-16
1
2
3
4
Sec. 1. Section 24-8B is added as follows:
24-8B. Strategic Plan to End Food Insecurity in Montgomery County.
(a)
The Chief Innovation Officer must develop
~
Strategic Plan to End
Food Insecurity in Montgomery County
Qy
December
Strategic Plan must at least include:
.L
2016. The
5
6
7
ill
ill
ill
demographic
and
geographic
information on poverty
ill
Montgomery County;
demographic and geographic information on participation
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP);
demographic and geographic information on participation
ill
ill
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) food supplement program;
ill
ill
®
ill
participation in free and reduced meals
Qy
school;
participation in other school based food programs;
demographic estimates regarding food insecurity;
information on the relationship between access to transportation
and access to food;
15
16
17
18
19
tID
{2}
information on how food literacy impacts food insecurity; and
[[A]]
~
5-year Plan, with recommended actions, that strives to
reduce food insecurity
Qy
at least 10% each year. The Plan must
include:
(A) recommendations to reduce food insecurity for seniors and
children in the first year ofthe Plan; and
20
21
22
23
(ill
cost estimates to implement the Plan.
24
(hl
In developing the Strategic Plan, the Chief Innovation Officer must
consult with:
25
26
27
ill
ill
the County Department of Health and Human Services;
the County Department of Transportation;
o
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BILL
No. 19-16
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
ill
ill
ill
®
ill
lID
(2)
the County Office ofAgriculture;
the Regional Service Center Directors;
Montgomery County Public Schools;
the County Planning Department;
[[The]] the Office of Community Partnerships;
[[The)) the Montgomery County Food Council
Manna Food Center;
[[The)) the Capital Area Food Bank;
organizations that are geographically located throughout that
County that provide emergency or sustained food assistance; and
.run
(U)
fl1)
organizations that are geographically located throughout the
County whose mission is to reduce and eliminate poverty in the
County.
(ill
By December
1
each year, the Chief Innovation Officer must submit
~
report to the County Executive and County Council. The annual report
must:
ill
ill
ill
update the information required in Section 24-8B(a);
include activities, accomplishments, plans, and objectives to
implement the Strategic Plan;
include cost estimates for the following fiscal year
implement the Strategic Plan.
necess~
to
o
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insecurity
plan\bill5 m.doc
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LEGISLATIVE REQUEST REPORT
Bill 19-16
Health and Sanitation
-
Strategic Plan to End Food Insecurity
DESCRIPTION:
Bill 19-16 would require the Chief Innovation Officer to propose and
update a Strategic Plan to End Food Insecurity in Montgomery
County.
The County has an array ofprogramming to address food insecurity,
administered by various government departments and nonprofit
organizations, but there is no strategic plan for our county to follow
as we seek to address and ultimately eliminate food insecurity in the
County.
To develop a strategic plan
to
reduce and eliminate food insecurity in
the County.
PROBLEM:
GOALS AND
OBJECTIVES:
COORDINATION:
Chief Innovative Officer
FISCAL IMPACT:
To be requested
ECONOMIC
IMPACT:
EVALUATION:
EXPERIENCE
ELSEWHERE:
SOURCE OF
INFORMATION:
To be requested
To be researched.
To be researched.
Amanda Mihill, Legislative Attorney,
240-777-7815
APPLICATION
N/A
WITHIN
MUNICIPALITIES:
PENALTIES:
N/A
F:\LAW\BILLS\1619 Food Insecurity Plan\LRR.Docx
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MONTGOMERY COUNTY COUNCIL
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND
ROGER BERLINER
COUNCILMEMBER
DISTRICT 1
CHAIRMAN
TRANSPORTATION, INFRASTRUCTURE
ENERGY
&
ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE
MEMORANDUM
April 14, 2016
TO:
Council President Nancy Floreen
Council Colleagues
FROM: Council Vice President Roger Berliner
Councilmember George Leventhal
Councilmember Craig Rice
RE:
Legislation to Create A Strategic Plan to Address Food Insecurity
Colleagues, we are writing to ask you to join us in co-sponsoring legislation that we plan on introducing
next week. The goal of the bill is straight forward and one that we are confident all of us have a strong interest
in achieving. Currently, 77,780 individuals in our county are food insecure, meaning that at any given point in
time, they do not know where their next meal will come from. In a county as wealthy as ours, that is simply
unacceptable.
Several months ago. in preparation for our FYI7 operating budget deliberations, Council Vice President
Berliner asked our Office of Management and Budget to put together an inventory showing all of the programs
that receive government funding to address food insecurity in the county. The results ofthat inventory are
attached.
What the inventory makes abundantly clear is that while our county has an array of programming to
address food insecurity, administered by various government departments and nonprofit organizations. what we
are lacking - to the detriment of those 77,780 individuals - is a strategic plan for our county to follow as we
seek to address and ultimately eliminate food insecurity in our county.
Our County needs a plan, a plan we own. We believe that plan should, at a minimum. strive to reduce
food insecurity by at least 10% a year. We will need data. And we wil1 need our community partners to work
together. That is why we are introducing this legislation. which would mandate the creation of a strategic plan
for addressing food insecurity.
The plan will
be
developed by the Montgomery County Food Council and other key community
stakeholders. As you are probably aware, the Food Council has already devoted significant time and resources
to studying food insecurity in the county. Their participation, as well as the input from other public and private
organizations listed in the bill, will ensure that the plan has the level of depth and analysis we need as
policymakers to address the complexities surrounding food insecurity.
STELLA
B.
WERNER OFfICE BUILDING'
100
MARYLAND AVENUE,
6
TIi
FLOOR,
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND
20850
(
5~)
\d.
240-777-7828 OR 240-777-7900, TIY 240-777-7914, FAX 240-777-7989
WWW.MONTGOMERYCOUNTYMD.GOV
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To make this plan a reality, we will be requesting as part of our FYI7 operating budget deliberations
that the Council appropriate $75,000 to the Chief Innovation Officer to develop the plan. Food has become a
significant aspect of the Chief Innovation Officer's responsibility, including spearheading the study on food
hubs, working on kitchen incubators, and serving as co-chair of the Food Council itself.
We would be grateful for your co-sponsorship on this legislation, which we believe is long overdue and
would greatly assist in consolidating the existing efforts in our county to address the critical issue of food
insecurity. Thank you for your consideration.
###
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OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT
AND
BUDGET
I$ian Leggett
County Erecutfve
Jennifer
A
Hughes
Director
MEMORANDUM
January
21,
2016
TO:
Roger Berliner, Vice
Presjden~
County Council
FROM:
SUBJECT:
Jennifer
A.
Hu~rector.
Office
.ofManagement
and
BU~get.
Request
for
Inventory of Hunger
Rehef
Programs
and Imtlatlves
In
Montgomery County
In response to your request for an inventory of
hunger
relief programs and initiatives in
Montgomery County,
I
have attached a
list
of
programs and initiatives supported
by
our C9unty through
department budgets. the Executive and Council Grants process, County contracts
with
community
organizations, Federal
and State funded programs that
serve County residents,
and
programs
administered
by
Montgomery
County Public Schools (MCPS)that
seek
to
reduce ht,tnget. The Office of
Management
and
Budget
has identified 13 programs
in
FY16
'\\'ithin
the Department
of
Hea.lth and HUml!ll
Services
with a hunger
component
totaling $6,2 million in County,
State and
Federal support.
In
FY 16, Executive
and
Council
grants
provided $645,330
in
general
funds
supporting
23
grantl>
to 15 non-profit
organizations to address hunger. MCPS reports FY 15 Federal
reimbursement
supporting the Free and
Reduced
Priced Meals Program
totaling
$30.5 million,and FYl5 State funding for the
Maryland
Meals
for
Achievement Program tOtalitlg $]65,850.
In
addition, under
separate
cover, please find
cQrrespondence
from
the
Montgomery
County
Food
Council detailing
their efforts
to
identify
funding
trends
and areas
of
interest
for
private
fundersm. the
region.
I hope
you
find this information usefuL We Jook forward to
working
with
the Health and
Human .Services Committe.e and the County Council duringFY17 budget discussion$ to ensure that our
scarce taxpayer resources
continue
to
be
used
as efficiently
and effectively
as possible to
fight hunger in
our community.
JAH:rs
cc: Tim L. Firestine, Chief Administrative Officer
(,;ouncitPresident Nancy Floreen
Councilmember
George4lventhal
Councilmember Craig Rice
Vms
S.
Ahluwalia.
Director,
Dep~ment
of Health
and
Human Services
Larry
Bowers, lnterim Superintendent,
Montgomery County
Public
Schools
Daniel Hoffman. Co-Chair.
Montgomery
County Food Council
<mice of the Director
·-·---·--.,--·-·······-·-···----·-·i'ol-i1·~~ s;;;;"'i"4th'fk;:'-:R~k;ilie, M;;1~d
20"&50·-:;240-·777.2800·---------···--·-·----··
www.montgomerycountymQ·gov
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IW
WUklns
Ave. Women's Assessment
Center
MCCH Men's.E.mergency Contriilct
Yes
$0100
not chatgeus for food.
Ye,
SNH
Mt. Calvary
Baptist
Church He!ping
Hands
Greentree Shelter
Table
Yes
I
I
SNH
SNH
Vas
YIIS
flinGIng
!-IHS General
&
State
HHS
$134,722
Fundln!!
Mi-4,
~~nGi,~1
1'1.
<:'t~t-a
l:'1'io.I<:'
SO
OD.I!S Ilot
rover
food.
Staffing only.
SNH
Ves
1"""1...,, Nutritkm
Program
ADS
Most
service
dellvered
by
Nutrition Program
ADS
Most servti:(!
deilvered
by
amtr;!ct
Program[NSIPll
'illS
:>lIiU,UIJI)IH)1l;
Gener~1
Funding
®
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FY16 Council Approved
Food
Grants
Organization
Description
Provides
for
the Emergency Food
Tetal
Grant
Type
Bethesda Help
program
Provides etnf.'lrgeDcy assistance for
e,,;cnon prevention. utilities,
prescriptions. and referrals
for
denta1!viSion services
and
clothing/food
Provides for a farmers
market
nutrition
incentive program
and
complementary
healthy eating education program
To. deliver monthly allotment of
perishable and non-perishable food to
senior citizens and individuals With
disabdities (Housebound Clients).
$2.000
CEGrant
Community Ministries of
Rod.ville
$23,000 CCGrant
Crossroads Community :r:'ood
Network Inc.
$60,920
CCGrant
EduCate Support
~f,Vices.lnc
First African Meth()dist
Episcopal Church of
Provides for the SHARE food prOiram for
Gaithersburg, fnc.
low-income
families
Provide the basic needs of food,
diapers,
and formula for low-income residents in
Gaithersburg/Montgomery Village.
Provides for food, diapers,
and
formula
for low-income residents
in
GaithersburgIMomgomery Village
Provides for support
to
local farmers
to
introduce fresh locally
grown
produce
into the
food safety
net
system
$40,000
CEGrant
$6,410
CEGrant
Gaithersburg HELP, fnc.
$25,000
CE Grant
Gaithersburg HELP, Inc.
$5,000
CCGrant
growingSOUL
Inc.
$9,750 CC Grant
Provides money to local farmers and
intrQduces fresh locally grown produce
growingSOU(. Inc.
into the food safetynet system.
Provides
support
to
purchase
food
to be
Kids
In
Need Distributors. Inc.
distnouted
to children
Provides for bringing
locany
grown
produce to County residents
experiencing hunger and to recover
produce from local farmers markets
Manna Food Center, .Ihc..
Provides for the Smart sacks program for
elementary school students
$20,000
CEGrant
$30,000 CCGrant
$20,000
C€
Grant
Manna Food Center,
Inc
$32,500
CE Grant
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healtby foods for weekend
to
at
least 2,440 elementary schOQI
Istudents experiencing hunger and
fooo
1........v1f'I'''Q
Food Center,.
Provides support to bring
fresh
produce
people experiencing bungerand rescue
pro<lU(~
from farmers
rnarkcts that may
I "H·.......,,,"'''''
be
or
discarded
$17
Grant
Food Center, Inc.
Grant
Program assists all who need help in
Montgomery County irre$pective of
religion, ethnic back
ground
or
Provides for operating support for the
food
!'PCI1V~1'V n"n~'''''m
MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MUSLIM
inc
ni1;ltil'lin
Inc.
Provides fot operating support for food
Camillus Catholic Church
Contract salary for Coordinator to
support and expand
the
Food Council
activities
in fostering a healthy and.
sustalnahle·
food
<:VC1r~m
Grant
Vrn,,.Ii.,,,,
for a Fiscal ,Impact Study
on
.,......."'n....
aFoodHub
men Who
Care
Ministries
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FY 15 MCPS Division of Food and
Month
Breakfast
lSreaicfast
Severe Need
5,833,147
932,2021
0
1 /079,331
212,661
0
MMFA
(state)
01
17,3OQ,9LL
2,794,851
165,850
lunch
After
School
Snacks
174/105
2S
Q
After
School
Suppers
967,798
1,207.,269
0
0
3,939,738
0
mmer
0
165,850
Total
26,562,572
(IT)
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MONTGOlvffiRY
COUNTY
FOOD COUNCIL
January
4,2016
Ms.. Rachel Silberman
Montgomery County Office of Management and Budget
101 Monroe Street, 14th Floor
Rockville, MD 20850
Dear
Ms.
Silbennan;
'Thank
you [oryaur response to County
Ccmm;:iimember
Roger Berliner's November .2015
letter
requesting the county government's assistance in creating a comprehensive list ofMontgomery County
hunger reliefprogrnrns
and
initiatives.
The
Montgomery County Food Council echoes the
Councilrncmber's assertion that this assessment is essential in order to develop a better understanding of
current efforts, identify existing gaps and
overlaps~
and maximize
the
impact ofthe
funding
invested in
food
system work. A
list
ofthe initiatives receiving direct county fundingwuuld be an incomplete
pIcture
of
the breadth and depth of food system work conducted in
OUr
County, and so the Food Council
win
assist as much as possible within the given timeframe to identify funding trends and areas of interest
for private funders in the region.
In
the
near
term
it
would
be
difficult to provide detailed data on
specific private funding and programs, but this is something we can look into in the future. Forthe time
being we hope
to
provide
some private sector context to the
data
you are gathering on
County
funding.
One
of tile greatest challenges of a decentralized funding system for hunger and other food system
programs is the difficulty in creating a single strategic vision forthe County.
It
is also
VQrY
labor
intensive to provide a complete picture of existing initiatives.
As
an independent non-profit with the
mission of connecting the wide range ofstakeholders in the entire Montgomery County food system, the
Food Council maintains a unique position
in
the County. The Food Council
has
the most
comprehensive understanding ofthe full food cycle in Montgomery County from table crop farmers
to
craft food producers. to restaurants
and
retail, and most importantly, to resident
food
consumers. 111e
Food Council has over 100 Council and Working Group members, volunteers representing private
foundations, non-profits, State and Federal government. and local businesses. These partners can help us
gather mfmmation that may not be captured
in
County govemmentrecords. In addition,
we
feel
it
:is
important to consider food
system
work
as
a
whole~including
not only
hunger
reliefeffortS but also
agricultural programs and services, as well as economic and workforce development initiatives.
4825 Corden
Avenue,
Suite 204 Bethesda, MO 20814
I
806.395.5.593
mocofoodtounciLorg
1
mocofuodcouncil@gmail.com
(rr
I
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In
2016, the Food Council will undertake the significant task ofcreating a Food Chatter for
Montgomery
County~
conducting a thorough assessment ofthe cun-entstate of food system work and
establishing
a.lo~"tenn
strategy for addressing existing isSl.1es and gaps in effort. However) below are
some resources and information that should be of value in your immediate effort.
• We are aware
ofover
90
organizations providing
emergency
food
services in
our
area.
many of
which are smal1, community-based organizations that likely do not receive County fimding.
Some examples of recent food system projects receiving funding from non-government sources:
o
Our
Food Access Working
Grou.p
received a project support
grant
in 2015
frtml
Kaisc't
Permanente to conduct a Community Food Access assessrnentand Healthy Food
Availability Index study.
o The Community Food Rescue project received private funding to customize the online
platfonn for their
food
recovery system to better meet the '$pecific needs ofMontgomery
COunty.
o Compass, a
Washingto~
D.C.- based organization that provides pro bono business
consulting to non-profits, donated
$130,000 in-kind
hotmi to help combat
the
hunger
problem in Montgomery
County.
The AbeUFoundation
1
Town
Creek Foundation, Mead Family Foundation; TO Charitable
Foundation,
and
WolpoffPamily Foundation among others,all contribute over
$25.000
annually
to food sy;;tem efforts in Montgomery County.
The
largest food security organi?.ation in Montgomery
CoUnty•.
Manna Food Center. receives
its
funding
from a dive.rsity
Qf
sources, with
the majority coming from individtulls and Workplace
campaIgps (51 %»private foundations (13%), and corporate donors (5%). SmalIer organizations
likely receive funding from fewer
sources,
however.
The Johns. Hopkins Center for a Livable Future
(nICLF)
works w1th students, educators,
researchers, pol1cyrnakers, advocacy organizations, and communities to build a healthier, morc
equitable, and resilient food system.
mCLF
is actively connected
to
the
Food
Council.
suppOrting our Food Access Working Group efforts and the development of our policy
campaign. Their mapping project provides valuable Montgomery County-specific information
including farms. processofS
f
distributors~
.retail
outlets,
and purchasing institutions:
1
http://W\\w.ihsph.edrl/research!centers~and-institutes!johns-honkirts-center-for-a-Hvable-·
future{Wde~..:.h.!WJ.
• Washington Regional Food Funders
w-as
established
to
develop a deeper uttdetstanding ofhow
philanthropic inveStnients in.healthy, affordable
food
are made
in
the
Greater
Washington
Region..https:!!www.washingtQngrantmakers.otg(food-svsterns.
• The
Wallace Center is part ofthe Enterprise and Agriculture
Group
ofWin:rock International alld
supports communities
in
developing a modern food system that
is
healthier forpeople. the
environment, and the economy. A representative ofthis organization will join our Food
Economy Working Group's efforts to explore the feasibility of a food hub in Montgomery
County.
httn:!/www.wallacecenter.om/
• the
Farming
at
the Metro 'sEdge Report summarizes the perspectives ofa
vanetyof
Montgom¢ry County stakeholders on the current state of local
agricultur~
and the
obstacles. and
opportUnities that exist for sustainable agricultural productivity:
ht1p:I!www.montgomerycount,Ymd.goy/alZservices/resQurcesiflicsifamefinalreport.pdf
We
will continue to research this topic and share information as
it
comes available. Montgomery County
is uniquely positioned to
be
a regional and nationa11eader ina11eviating hunger
and
creating a
truly
sustainable
local food system.
By
reducing redundancies and maximizing collaboration across funding
(Q)
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sources, we can move forward with a more effi.cieilt, stmtegic plan to address these environmental,
nutritional, social. and economic issues affecting our residents. If
theF~d
Council can assist you
further
in
any way. please let us know. We would welcome a conversation around creating a more
comprehensive" strategic vision fur food system funding
in
the County.
Our'beliefis
that
the
current
mechanisms are
too
fragmented,
making
requests, such as Councilmember Berliner's request, difficult
to respond to without
great
effort
Thank you
for
your ongoing support and commitment
to
this shared goal. We lookforwar4 to
continuing to work together
in
2016.
Best Regards,
Heather Bruskin, Food Council Manager
®
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.Fiscallmpact Statement
Council Bill 19-16, Health and Sanitation - Strategic Plan to End Food Insecurity
1. Legislative Summary
Bill 19·16 would require the Chief Innovation Officer to propose and update a Strategic Plan to
End Food Insecurity
in
Montgomery County and target a 10% reduction each year, The bilijust
establishes the creation ofthe plan and annual updates, it does not cover implementation or
associated costs of the plan.
2. An estimate of changes in County revenues and expenditures regardless ofwhether the revenues
or expenditures are assumed in the recommended or approved budget. Includes source of
information, assumptions, and methodologies used.
The legislation does not affect County revenues. The Chief Innovation Officer anticipates
requiring approximately 305 hours of staff time
I
to develop the strategic plan. At an average
hourly cost of $76.05, development ofthe strategic plan would cost $24,794 in staff time to
produce. An additional $75,000 would
be
required
for
contracted consultant services.
The.
Department estimates that these services would
be
required only in the
frrst
year of development
of
the
strategic plan and will not incur any additional ongoing costs.
3> Revenue and expenditure estimates covering at
least
the
next
6 fiscal years.
In the first year of development of the strategic plan, the Office of County Executive would
require $24,794 in staff time cost in addition to $75,000 in contracted consultant services. There
are no ongoing costs beyond the first year.
4. An actuarial analysis through the entire amortiz..ation period for each bill that would affect retirt'e
pension or group insurance costs.
Not
applicable.
5. An estimate ofexpenditures related to County's information technology (IT) systems, including
Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems.
None anticipated.
6. Later actions that may affect futlJre revenue and
expenditures
if
the bill authorizes future
spending,
The hill does not authorize any
spending.
lbe
bill only establishes the creation ofa plan and does
not authorize or mandate
future
funding.
7. An estimate ofthe staff
time needed to
implement
the
bill.
Kenneth Welch, Environmental Health and Regulatory Services, HHS; Barbara l<\udrews, Early Childhood
Services, HHS; Clark Beil, Environmental Health and Regulatory
Services) HHS;
Mark Hodge, Chief, Public
Health, HHS; Betty Lam. Chief, Office ofCommunity Affairs, HHS; Monica Martin, Linkages to Leaming. HHS;
Sharon Strauss, Community A(.1:lQn Agellcy, HHS; Daniel Hoffman, ChiefInnQvation Officer. CEX
I
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See #2 above,
8. An explanation of how the addition ofnew staff responsibilities would affect other duties.
The project-ba..<;ed environment in the Innovation program means there is a continual rotation of
new projects. This would simply
be
a new project with contractor/consultant support.
9. An estimate ofcosts when an additional appropriation is needed.
Implementation of the plan's recommendations
will
require an appropriation offunds. The
legislation
requires
that the strategic plan include a cost estimate
to
implement its
recommendations.
10"
A
description of any variable that could affect revenue and cost estimates.
None
anticipated.
11. Ranges of revenue or expenditures that are uncertain
Of
dift1cult to
pro,iect
None expected.
12. If a bill is likely to have no fiscal impa.ct, why that is the case.
The bill only requires the creation of a plan and an annual update. Implementation of the pIau is
subject to the appropriation of funds. For
this rea.<;on,
the only fiscal impact of
(his
bill is
contractor support
to
assist in the creation of a pian.
13~
lJili">f fiscal impacts Qr comments.
None,
14. The foHowing contributed
to
and concurred with this analysis:
Dan Hoffman, Office ofthe County Executive
Patricia Stromberg.
Health
and
Human
Services
Jane Mukira,. Office ofManagement and Budget
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.Economic Impact Statement
Bill 19-16., Health and Sanitation - Strategic Plan
to
End ll"ood Insecurity
Background:
lbis
legislation would
require the Chief Innovation Otncer to propose and update a
Strategic
Plan to End Food Insecurity in Montgomery County.
.
The purpose of Bill 19-16 is to develop a strategic plan to reduce
fClod
insecurity by at
lea"t ten percent (10%) pcr year. As defined by the County Council Vice President
to
the
County Council dated April ] 4, 2016, food insecurity in Montgomery County is that "at
any given point in time, 77,780 individuals do not know where their next meal \¥ill come
from."
1.
The sources of information, assumptions, and metllodologies used.
There are no sources of infonnation. assumptions, and methodologies used in the
preparation of the economic impact
statement
The purpose of Bill 19-16 would
require the development ofa strategic plan to address food insecurity with the goal of
the plan to reduce such insecurity by at least ten percent per year.
2. A
description of any variable that could affect the economic impact estimates.
The legislation ,,¥ill not directly affect economic impact estinlates. However, the goal
of the plan
is
to reduce food insecurity to approximately 78.000 COWlty residents.
3.
The
Bill's
positive or negative
effect,
if
any
on employment, spending, savings,
inve8tment~
incomes, and property values in the
COUlIty.
Bill 19-16 .will not have a direct positive or negative efIeet on employment, spending,
savings, investment, incomes, and property 'Values in the County. The result of
implementing a strategic plan would in the short- and long-nm to reduce
food
insecurity. The economic effect ofthe strategic plan will
be
determined by the
speci11c actions taken to implement the plan.
4.
If
a Bill is likely to have no economic impact,
why
is that the case'!
Bill 19-16 will not have a direct economic impact. Please see paragraph #3.
5.
The
following contributed to or concurred
with this analysis:
David
Platt, ivtary
Casciotti, and Robert Hagedoom, Finance.
J'
e h
ach, Director
Department of Finance
~----------------------
Page
t
of
I
@
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STATEMENT ON.BEHALFOF THE COUNTY EXEcurtvEREGi\RDING BII.L 19-16,
·STRATEOICPL.A,N TO
ENDFQOIJJNSECURITY
'
june
14,.2016
.Executive Leggett's
administrati9D
~ tothat~
be
~w:q*edeonaborativel)'
W;ithaWide
varietyof$1:ake!iolders to'cteate a stroD.g·safetY
netinMontgomeryCounty~
These
effort8have
shown positive tesUltstbutthere hasbeencoritinual
~9nt1lk
system
as
d~ogx:aphics
inthe
County haveehange:d.
.A$S~ Mr.Legg~supportSa,comprehem;ive;
strategic plan
to
end
food
insecurj.ty
in
MOntgOlllety
COUnty.
and
is
pleased
to share
the
experience,
a.n.dexpertise
Qf
OlW'
teaminworkingtowafd this goal.
.
. '.
Foodinsee\lri1Y
is
more
thanJust
alack
oI.accessrohealthy. affordable
food.
It isa
S}'tllPtoDto.f
deeper
systemic:
is~in.cludittg
poverty,
laclcofeconomic opportunity
and
educaUonalgaPS?
thatJayertogether
creating
substantial bartfersfor,theaPPtQxh:nately
80,00.0 CoWl1:y
residents
who
do
not
know
wh~e
theu
ne~ntea1.will,Cf{tnefrom}.~crisesateonlysolved
~pomrily
by
c:rnergency
foOQ.Qsslstance.so we
have.
w()rke4tocreateaf~~. tll~
respects therteed
for a broad
spectxumofstak~ho1ders
to
participat~inad(hessing
these
root
ca~s.
Thank
y()~
fot the opportunity
to
provide
Written
testimony
regarding
Bill
19-16'1~tmtegicPlan
to
End Food Insecurity. No residento'!Montgotnery CoUnty shoWd live
with
the fear
of;llo(
knowingfroIll
wl1er~
their
next
m.ea1
Will
come. This.bas
been
a
commitment
of
County
F{)raboutth~pastfiveyears"ExeCutive
stitffbas
Worked
closely with
the
Montgorn,eryCo,u.nty
.Food
Council, service providers such Manna
Food
Centet,
aDd.many;oftheor~9nsan4
comprehensive
food system approac:h.Tbe DepartnientofHealth
and
Human
services.
WOrking
.with.1:l
·br~
Iietwork of
pl'ovi4ers,bas
sU0cessfullyimplementedConm:t~Food
Rescue.
which
developed from an idea
an4
a CourityQQunci1worlQng gt()up jnto.a
prp~tha.ttoday
rescues tons offoodt:hatwQ:u1dothetwise'go
to
w~teandBets.it
ll1wthe
hands
of
people
who
ileedit
.
R~ntlythe <mic~ofM~eme1itandBudget,
at
the
requestofCounci.ImemberBerliner~
individuals
who
willtestifyregardingtbis
bUt
We
··~·prO'lldofb\lt~inpli.shments
together.
Ex~utiv¢staffbave
s¢rved
on
the
Foode<nmcil.shiceits
inception
an4worke9:toadvanceits
as
oottdutfedattfuvenlory
of
Hunger
ReliefPJ;o:gmms
and
JnitiativesIn ¥ontgometyCounty.It
concludedttuit
inF¥16 the Qounty
spent
over
$6m on
programs
with
a hunger
component.
Montgomery COunty PubHcSchoolsrecefved over
$30minf~al
flIlq
~f\Utd$for
school..
based
nutrition programs.
These
resollfces
t¢presentasignifieant
investment
mend1ng
hunger·
and
we
welcome any
~ort
that
could
help
maketheseinvestmentsm9ree~tive and~fficient
To doJhis, we
encoUt_geanactlonplanthat
is
comprehensive
in
nature,amtdoesnQtju,st
provide a
ilaIiowthcuson
distribution
ofemerg~()yfoo4aSs~ce. As:note~hunger
is a
symPiomof a
;rnucnmore
oomplexchalIenge.Therefore,we
appreciate
the
intent
ofthls bill
tQ
engage
it.
broad
spectrum
ofstak1!holders"By
inoorporatingmuitiplepiUars ofthe
food
syst~m,
we can
'CllSUte
that
we
end'ltunger
by
tapping
ip:t9
tb.edeep food system.resources
atourdisposaI.
Our
agriculturalco.tnmunity,outphilantbropit
and
nonprofitproviders~
and
the
private
.~~
1
FeedtngAmerica's
Map
th$Meal
Gap..study
of2014.
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
can work together to
create
a.
food system
tha.t
views food as opportunity
and
a path
to
\
empowerment.
'With
these
thou~
in·
mind,Couilty Executive Leggett offers
the
followU1gQonstr:uctive
cortunents on $pecllicele.ments of
th8
bill:
.Berlliiet,
• Althoughtbeend goal
oithe
pIan.is
tQ
entifOOdinse~urlty, ~
dQ see
this
as an
opwrtunity fora
broader
look
.atthe
food.
system.
TherefQte,
wesuppodJhe work
of
tru;
Food
Council to
align
tbephm outlin¢
in
Bi1119-1§with
itsoomprehensive~FoodAction
:PIp.. Givellthe work
tbe
Food
Council
hasperfoimedtQ
StUdy foocitlcccssm
the County,
tb~ are~.lQgical~in helpiIlg.conv~the
broader
foodsystem.co:mrnunity~
TbebiU'states that
theplm.shollld
"strive
to~uce hlJ:Q.g~by
at.1east
1
O%eachyear;~l
The
Chief
Innovanon
offiCer
arid the DeparltnentofHealti1and
H~
ServiCC$ have
wotlr;:ed coJlabo1'$ively
together furyearsonmultiple tood,;.related
projectS;
incl~
CotmnunityFood
Resc~~ Th~Wellaveno obj~t:i~t9the !m)ovationPtQ~
working
~ossthe
releva.ntdepartments
to
¢reate this pla.n.Orice
compIete,i.ttnaY
be
'more
appropriate
to
tnmsferitnpletli~tationofthe;plan
to
Health
JUliauman
Services.
-Creation ofthe plan
in
FY17
will
tequiteadditional
rC$Otrrces~A.sil(j:tedinthe!ScaI
itnpa.<rt:statement;this
Wtlul:d
have
an
impact
~n.staff
time. However
We
dofeei
it
could
beaccoJI1plished With the additional
funds
requeste<l
inthemeIno
by
CounCl1m.ember
-
Although
the
GlltntyEx~tive
isa
strongproponentof
perfotJI1atlCCmeasw:esan<4if '
this
bill
is
enacted,
·wewill
create a
planifmeasw;¢able
goaIs~
he
believes
it
is premature
to
put
thisJan.gpagein the leg),slationuntilwe can adequately'
defme01l,t'criteria
for
success.
'Thank
you for
the
opportu.tUty
toprovide.tbis testimony
and
.we
look.forw~
lQcontinued
discussion
I11ltlcollaboration
on
this issue.
.
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MONTGOMERY COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION
850 Hungerford Drive
+
Room 123
+
Rockville, Maryland 20850
June 6, 2016
The Honorable Roger Bediner, Councilmember
Montgomery County Council
Stella B. Werner Council Office Building
100
Maryland Avenue, 6th Floor
Rockville, Maryland 20850
Dear Mr. Berliner:
~
N.t...... QUality A..."
k:Olm
Baldrige
21110
Awmf
RKipien.
On behalf of my colleagues at the Montgomery County Board of Education,
I
am writing in strong
support of Montgomery County Council Bill 19-16,
Health and Sanitation-Strategic Plan to End
Food
Insecurity.
This bill would require the chief innovation officer to propose and update a strategic plan to end food
insecurity in Montgomery County. Food insecurity is a significant problem for many school-age
children in Montgomery County. There are approximately 54,542 students who qualify for Free and
Reduced-price Meals System (FARMS) services in our school system; in the 2015-2016 school year,
35 percent of Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) students received FARMS support,
with 83 percent of those students eligible for
free
meals. For some children, weekends and vacation
periods mean that meals may be missed or the amount of food their families can provide is not
sufficient for their needs.
The Board of Education and MCPS have worked closely with the County Council to help alleviate
food insecurity in the County; most recently, expanding the Weekend Food
BagslSmartsaclrs
program.
As such, the Board welcomes any future partnerships with
the
County Council and supports any further
work towards identifying children and efficiently delivering and distributing food.
Thank you for your leadership on this issue. Should you require any further information, please do not
nesitate to
contact
me.
Michael
A.
Durso
MAD:lsh
Copy to:
Members of the Montgomery County Council
Members of the Board of Education
Mr.
Bowers
Dr. Zuckerman
Mr. Ikheloa
Phone 301·279-3617
+
Fax 301-279-3860
+
boe@mcpsmd.org
+
www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org
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Maryland Regional Team
Capital Area Food Bank
4900 Puerto Rico Avenue, NE
Washington, DC 20017
June 14th, 2016
Montgomery County Council
Council Office Building
100 Maryland Avenue, 6th Floor
Rockville, MD 20850
Dear Council President Floreen and members of the Montgomery County Council,
My name is Dario Muralles and I am the Director of the Maryland Regional Team at the Capital
Area Food Bank. As the largest organization in the Washington metro area working to solve
hunger, the Capital Area Food Bank reaches 540,000 people each year with good, healthy food.
That is why I'd like to take the opportunity today to express the CAFB's strong support for Bill
19-16, Strategic Plan to End Food Insecurity sponsored by Councilmember Berliner and co­
sponsored by Councilmember Leventhal.
In
Montgomery County, over 77,000 residents struggle to get the food they need. That's 8% of
the county's population.
In
fiscal year 2015, the CAFB delivered 4.6 million pounds of fruits,
vegetables, and groceries that were distributed throughout Montgomery County through Food
Assistance Partners like Manna Food Center, Nations United Baptist Church, and EduCare. We
also distribute directly to clients in areas ofhigh need; one example is our Family Market
Program, a school-based monthly pop-up market at locations like Kennedy
&
Watkins High
schooL Through the council's generosity we have implemented this program at 4 school clusters
and have reached over 2,500 families with over 180,000 pounds of food as of January 2016.
The CAFB supports Bi1l19-16 because it would create a framework for
all
hunger-relief
organizations in the county to follow and support. The bill would call for the creation of a 5 year
plan that would include relevant demographic and geographic information on poverty and food
insecurity with the goal of reducing the food insecurity level by 10% each year. This is ambitious
and our suggestion would be to set a target goal
after
the plan is developed. Three years ago, the
CAFB created a Hunger Heat Map, which allowed us to align our efforts in reaching seniors with
Manna, to fill gaps in the hunger safety net, and avoid duplication of services. The lessons from
our on-the-ground experience and data from the Hunger Heat Map have demonstrated a
tremendous need for cooperation from the business, government, and non-profit sectors to not
only reduce the food insecurity rate but also increase the quality of food distributed to
communities suffering from diet-related illnesses. The Hunger Heat Map also reinforced for
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everyone at the CAFB
that
hunger is
here
and it exists
in
every community, but we also know
that together we can solve hunger.
In
conclusion, I'd like to thank the council for the opportunity to testify
in
support of Bill 19-16
and request a favorable vote.
Thank
you,
Dario Muralles
Director, Maryland Regional Team
Capital Area Food Bank
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COMMUNITY ACTION SOARD
May 10,2016
Montgomery County Council
Council
OffICe
Building
100 MatyJolld Avenu6. 5th Floor
Rock,rillo,
Maryland 20850
Dear
Councilmell1bcrs:
Jam wriling to you on behalfof tile Community Action Board (CAB) to express the Board'ssnpport for
Council Bill 19-16 - Strategic Plan to End Food Insecurity.
Food and nutrition programs are an ongoing priority for our Board. CAB advocates for
p~licics
tilat
will
help low-income residents move towards self-sufficiency. The extremely high
cost
of
living
ill
MootgomelY
County contributes
to
the large number
of
residents, 71,780,
who
a1'C
foodinseclIre.' Our
Board beJlevcs that a strategic plan
will
)lC~lp
to coordinate services for these residents and. as the goal of
(his Bill states, reduce food insecurity
by
at least .10% each
yca~·.
We would also like
to
state ottr strong support for Bill 19-16's fucus on senior hunger. According
(0
the
Maryland Department ofLegislative
SCI'V~cCS,
approximately 11.15% ofCounty seniors ( 1.1 14 residents)
are potentially eligible for SNAP
benefif$,iI The
County·s Strategic Plan can help to address the needs of
these seniors
And
ensure tbat
no
seniors are left hungry
in Our
community,
Included with
this lettel', Illease find a brief
SlIlnnllUY
ofthe Community Action Agency's work to address
food insecurity througb its
paltners
and direct services.
Community Action stands ready to support the Contlcil and the Chief Innovation Officer in
deve10lling
the Strategic Plall. We support the COllncil's efforts to reduce
rood
ins.ecurity and ensure that resources
are reaching
Ihose
ill
need.
1Y tthew
J.
Greell. Jr.
Chairman
Community Action Board
f_,......~~'
;Feeding
America
(FA)
http://feedingalllerica.org/
,
Ii
Tbe Maryland Department
of
Legislative Services September 11, 2015
Letter
10
Senator
Richard Madaleno
",
Department ofHealth and Human Services •
ome~
or
CommunIty AlTalrs • Community Ariton Agenc)'
. 2424 Reedie Drive; 2nd PIoor,
Suile
238 • Wheaton, Mluyllllld
20902
24{)·777-1697
(VoiceorvlaMORelay@711) •
240-777-3295
FAX
www.lhootgomcrycollntymd,govlhhs
301·2ru.·4850 TTY
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The Montgomery County Community Action Agency (CAA) addresses food insecurity in
Montgomery County through direct services, outreach and through
its
partner organizations.
The Takoma-East Silver Spring (TESS) Center
Since the early 70's, CAA's TESS Center has served the Long Branch community and waves of
new immigrants with access
to
food and othel' resources. TESS serves as a Neighborhood
Opportunity Network (NON) site, reaching evert further into the community to connect residents
with critical resources. TESS staffassist customers in completing applications for SNAP, WIC
and other public benefits. TESS also connects its customers with food from local food programs,
such as food pantries, SHARE bulk purchasing, and increases resources tbrough participating in
holiday giving programs.
Summer Meals Program
TIle TESS Center has served as a Summer Meals distribution site for two years. The Center
collaborates with Montgomery County Public Schools Food and Nutrition Services
to
organize
the summer meals distribution and comply with all requirements.
In
2015, the TESS Center
served
1.355
nutritious lunches meals
to
children throughout the summer.
Outreach
Community Action's Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Program partners with Maryland
Hunger Solutions to provide outreach to
ta.x
cHents regarding food and nutrition programs.
VITA serves low-to-moderate income residents, many of whom struggle
with
food insecurity.
Volunteer resource navigators meet with clients at VITA sites and provide information and
pre­
screening for SNAP and other food and nutrition programs. This year, the program plans to
expand by providing additional outreach throughout the year with a focus on senior hunger.
Pal1nel'S
The Community Action Agency has worked with two major food partners for over nine years:
Manna Food Center and Women Who Care Ministries, monitoring contacts with and providing
technical support to these organizations. Manila offers a 'yide variety ofservices, including food
distribution, fresh produce programs. a weekend food program for MCPS students, food rescue,
community discussions about food and nutrition, and nutritional classes. Women Who Care
Ministries manages the Helping Kids Eat Backpack weekend food program with MCPS. The
organization also provides food distribution to individuals, families and agencies.
Both Manna and Women Who Care Ministries are a part of the Montgomery County Food
Security Collaborative, which encourages increased collaboration to conceptualize better ways to
distribute food to those in need.
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Community Action's other food and nutrition pal1ners include Kids in Need Distributors, which
provides weekend food for children dut'ing the school year and a slimmer meal program;
Crossroads Community Food Network, which provides a food subsidies program
(Fresh Checks)
and operates a market program and Healthy Eating Program in MCPS, and the Mid-Atlantic
Gleaning Network. which provides gleaning oPPOl'tunities and fresh produce for low-income
residents.
All of the CANs food pal1ners are involved with the Montgomery Food Council. The Council
addresses food access, recovery, literacy, economy and environmental impact. The Council also
works closely with Maryland Hunger Solutions, working to fight hunger and improve the
nutrition, health, and well-being of children and families in Maryland.
Early Childhood
As the County's grantee for Head Stal1, CAA monitoi's the program to assure that the federal
standards related to nutrition are fully met.
TESS hosts the Judy Center based at Rolling Terrace Elementary School, twice a week at the
TESS Center and links with the program to enSUl'e participants ate aware of County food
resources.
Community Action Board Advocacy
The Community Action Board (CAB) has been a long-time advocate for food and nutrition
programs. CAB has supported legislation to ftllly fund and increase SNAP benefits, expand
.
school breakfast programs, and expand summer meals for children.
CAB has advocated for family supports in order to maximize family resources for food. Such
policies include increasing the minimum wage and expanding Earned ]ncome Tax Credits.
CAB supports use of the Self Sufficiency Standard (SSS) as an accurate measure of tile cost of
living in Montgomel'y County. Since the SSS includes location-based infOlmation about the cost
'ofbasic necessities, including food, the SSS provides a more accurate measure ofthe number of
people struggling to make ends meet in the County. CurrenUy. the CAB is working with
Cotnnlunity Action partners throughout the state to update the SSS for
2016.
CAB routinely updates information included in the Faces of Poverty report, which summarizes
poverty data. The data includes important statistics about hunger and food insecurity.
In
2015,
CAB hosted several pove11y forums in Gaithersburg. .East County, and the TESS
Center. The forums provided an opportunity for low-income residents to share their concems
and recommendations regarding issues impacting them and their families. Food access was
noted by many participants as a primary concern. CAB has used this illfonnatioll in its advocacy
. effOlts, providing infonnation to the County Council and the County Executive.
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\li\.
Crossroads
Network
6930 Carroll Avenue
Suite 426
Takoma Park, MD 20912
Testimony before the Montgomery County Council
in support of Bill
19-16,
Health and Sanitation - Strategic Plan to End Food Insecurity
Presented June
14, 2016
President Floreen and members of the County Council, my name is Christie Balch, and I am the
Executive Director of Crossroads Community Food Network. Crossroads is building a healthier,
more inclusive food system in the primarily immigrant, low-income community of
Takoma/Langley Crossroads. Founded in 2007 as a seasonal farmers market, Crossroads
originated the idea of using private funds to double federal nutrition benefits when people use
them to buy fresh fruits and vegetables at the market - making healthy food more affordable
while supporting local farmers.
Crossroads now also encompasses community-based healthy eating education and
microenterprise training for food business entrepreneurs. By connecting and empowering those
who grow, make, and eat nutritious foods, Crossroads is helping an underserved community
attain food equity and self-sufficiency.
We are grateful to the County Council for support of Crossroads, and we applaud your support
of farmers market incentives throughout the county-at our farmers markets and others who
are replicating our model.
We are so pleased to be part of this hearing-alongside such important organizations-and
would like to thank the sponsors of this bill. We're happy to see the prospect of a food secure
Montgomery County and feel this legislation has great potential to achieve lasting change.
We support recom"mendations made by Manna Food Center and others to strengthen this
legislation. Specifically, we would like to emphasize:
1) The plan should have a nonprofit co-owner to ensure this will be a multi-stakeholder
effort and to include voices of those who experience food insecurity.
2) The county must link this work with efforts being made on upstream factors related to
economic and social inequalities. Since the root cause of food insecurity isn't a lack of
food, but rather a lack of income, poverty reduction needs to be a major focus for the
county.
Thank you all for your efforts to ensure every Montgomery County resident is food secure.
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June
14,2016
To Whom it May Concern,
Thank you for opening the doors to energizing a practical conversation on
developing a strategic plan to end food insecurity in Montgomery County. My
grassroots non-profit organization, growingSOUL - Sustainable Opportunities for
Universal Learning creates, implements and advocates for sustainable, interconnected,
reciprocity-based food systems benefiting the vitality of our communities and their
residents as well as our planet. Our systems connect residents to one another and our
earth, and in the process of growing food, helps grow our SOULs. With our farming sites
located on historic Underground Railroad land in the east county, we continue the
regional legacy of striving for freedom and food for all as we replenish soils by
composting on them, and feed communities in need from our crops.
We demonstrate zero-waste food systems in our 2 main programs: through small-scale
gardening and composting with low-carbon footprints in "YardLink"; and we address
food production/recovery/preservation/recyc1ing in our "Putting Stock in Your
Community" program. Our food is delivered throughout the county in vehicles that run
on waste vegetable oil from the tortilla fryers at local Chipotle Mexican Grill restaurants
that we collect and filter at a local farn1. Our "Culinerati" work force consists of
permaculture experts at The Harvest Collective, adults with disabilities from S1. Colettas,
MCPS students seeking SSL hours, businesses seeking to give back, and volunteers from
the community-at-Iarge. They are a diverse, multi-generational team engaging hands-on
in becoming lifelong learners, connectors and part of growing a movement, not apart
from
it.
I have been working in partnership with other non-profits, businesses, government
and the community-at-Iarge to build a sustainable, resilient food system
infrastructure for over 6 years in the county. I co-founded the Montgomery County
Food Council and sat as their Coordinator for a year, and have been an active leader
in both the Environmental Impact and Food Recovery Working Groups since its
inception. growingSOUL has been the ONLY non profit in the county that combines
food production, processing, distribution and composting and the only SSL opportunity
for volunteers in the food system as young as 10 with no parental supervision. Our
leadership in community collaboration earned awards from Silver Spring Impact and
GOCA. Our ability to collaborate and advocate with other non-profits, businesses,
schools and government lead to our government appointment to represent food recovery
and composting needs for the county on the Solid Waste Advisory Committee.
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Our recent connection with the Maryland Food Center and Maryland Packaging helps the
state dramatically reduce its waste stream, helps food businesses be eligible for
tax
.
deduction benefits while simultaneously allowing Montgomery County to save money,
landfill space and time by providing an entire food recovery infrastructure with the
potential to divert 300,000 pounds of fresh food monthly.
We currently provide zero-waste services to a wholesale distributor that has been
throwing out 10,000 pounds of food weekly, and is now donating it to growingSOUL for
an IRS Tax Deduction. We triage the food to regional non-profits that distribute directly
to families, process it into wholesome meals, and/or send it to farmers for animal feed.
Anything un-utilized by the agencies along with their other compostables may
be
brought
back to Jessup for recycling via composting, eliminating 10,000 pounds of food currently
wasted in our landfills weekly. The state-run Maryland Wholesale Produce and Seafood
Markets has asked us to provide this service for 15,000 pounds of food daily collected at
the Maryland Food Center. Additionally, we are currently negotiating a partnership with
Maryland Packaging for use of their commercial kitchen and packing plant for our
workforce development program to create processed and preserved food for donation.
The infrastructure for refrigeration, inventory, transportation and composting, as well as
for food processing, preserving, and packing, is built into the warehouse of our business
partners, Coosemans DC and Maryland Packaging. There are 15,000 pounds of
wholesome food available daily at the state's wholesale produce and seafood market, as
well as a full processing kitchen and co-packing plant. Triaging and processing the food
on site and distributing in trucks bound for Safeways daily saves carbon footprint and
offers a tax deduction per mile to the distributor. Donating the seconds for the whole
market to growingSOUL means a Montgomery County-based non-profit has access to
75,000 pounds of wholesome food and the infrastructure to triage, process and
redistribute it weekly. In only one week operating with one distributor, we donated 18
pallets of food totaling over 12,000 pounds to DC Central Kitchen, Manna, Rainbow
Development Center and Nourish Now.
Unfortunately, most of the infrastructure needed to take advantage of all of this food does
not exist in Montgomery County. Only 2 agencies in the county, Manna and Nourish
Now, have the capacity to come pick up these tens of thousands of pounds of food, and
with their current capacity, can only come once a week. Several are able to take food if
we deliver it, but their buildings do not have loading docks, they do not have guaranteed
staff to be there to unload properly, and many others lack adequate storage. Much of the
recovered food needs to be processed and preserved as it is food deemed unsellable by
wholesalers, and they tend to hold it as long as possible to try and sell as much as they
can. I recently had 6 8' x 4' pallets of ripe papaya and mango that was "too soft" to be
given directly to a family, but perfect to be made into juices or processed into dehydrates,
but there was no Montgomery County kitchen with enough space to process it.
While growingSOUL was generously given 2 years to work for free at a church
commercial kitchen, we were able to process thousands of pounds of such food monthly,
turning it into juices, stocks, stuffings, jams and dehydrates. Unfortunately, our contract
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was not renewed because we got too big for our space. In rescuing and preparing more
food, we worked our way out of donated space. Commercial kitchens in Montgomery
County are severely limited, even for paying businesses. The only kitchen that is
available with enough space for our volunteer work force costs upward of $2000 a
month, something we had not budgeted for, but must come up with in order to continue
our programming.
It
has been a double-edged sword - the more we expand the amount of
food we recover and our capacity to process that food, the more expensive it gets to make
it. As a charity donating 90% of all of the food we process, we are dependent upon grants
to do so. growingSOUL is proud to have been supported by grants from our County
Executive and County Council for the past 4 of our 6 years. That support has kept the
doors of our single full time employee non-profit open, making a small dent in our county
needs. Unfortunately, our funding for our processing progmm was cut this year, so
without funding to rent space in a kitchen, we are having to turn to other partners, and the
partners who are wanting to work with us and have the capacity to handle the amount of
food to which we now have access are not in Montgomery County.
So here is the dilemma. Now that growingSOUL access to Maryland State
infrastructures, we have greatly expanded our capacity to bring food into the county. But
as we are now tasked with solving food insecurity for our county, we will need not only a
collaborative plan with enthusiastic capacity partners, but an infusion of millions of
dollars of financial investment to create the necessary infrastructure to properly store,
process, redistribute, recycle and produce more food within the county. I submit, we open
ourselves to looking into a regional solution, with partners who may already have the
infrastructure. We all need to be a part of the solution, and be willing to look to our
neighbors for help.
You have heard from many organizations stepping up to play their role in this
monumental task. The will is clearly abundant in the county. The urgency is real. I look
forward to being a part of this team moving forward on this critical journey to keep our
neighbors fed and this county thriving.
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IONk
Age Well. Live We/I.
To: Montgomery County, MO Councilmembers
From: Rose Clifford, RON, MBA
As a longtime Montgomery County, MO resident, senior hunger advocate, practicing health professional,
and subject matter expert on the nutritional needs of older adults, I support the development of a
strategic plan to end food insecurity in Montgomery County. A good start towards this was the recent
authorization by Governor Hogan of Senate Bill
758,
increasing the minimum Food Supplement Program
benefit from
$16
to
$30
per month for
18,000
seniors
62
and older statewide. While no one should go
hungry or lack access to sufficient healthy food, older adults are particularly vulnerable to the effects of
food insecurity, hunger, and sub-optimal nutrition. Their needs must have a seat and a voice at the table
in Bill
19-16.
Nationwide, food insecurity among older adults is increasing. Senior hunger is a health issue with very
high personal and economic costs. Senior malnutrition is often a "hidden secret" with devastating
individual suffering and societal consequences. The estimated annual cost of disease-associated
malnutrition in older adults in the US is
$51.3
Billion (Snider,
JT,
et al. JPEN,
2014).
Astoundingly,
marginal food insecurity in older adults is functionally equivalent to being
14
years older (Academy of
Nutrition and Dietetics,
2010)?
Food and nutrition issues are so important to good health and life quality for older adults, but are often
poorly understood or go unrecognized. According to the OefeatMalnutrition.Today coalition, up to 1
out of
2
older adults are at risk for malnutrition and up to
60%
of hospitalized older adults may already
be malnourished. Malnutrition increases the length of hospital stays, and leads to more complications
such as falls and readmissions. Eighty-seven percent of older adults have one of more chronic diseases
with nutritional implications, and based on the Healthy Eating Index,
83%
of older adults do not
consume a good quality diet.
It's also important to understand that senior hunger and malnutrition is not limited to low income
seniors but is a phenomenon that cuts across all income spectrums and is often an access issue. Factors
such as poor appetite, unintentional weight loss and frailty, isolation, decreased mobility, cognitive
decline, psychosocial and mental health issues, nutrient deficiencies, poor oral health, and lack of
transportation are common contributing factors to senior food insecurity and malnutrition. For these
and other reasons, older adults are often unable to plan, procure, prepare, or consume adequate meals.
For households that fall below
200%
of the Federal Poverty level, Maryland has the nation's
7th
highest
food insecurity rate among adults aged
50-59 {33.9%}
and the
8th
highest food insecurity rate among
those
60+ (18.7%).
The National Foundation
4125 Albemarle Stmef, NW WO$ntngwn, DC
20016~2105
TEl:202.966.1 055 TTY 202.B95.9444 FAX 202.895.0244
Unlf$d
Wey
#8833
<:Fe
#52489
wwwJ{)na.~
@I
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to End Senior Hunger's June 1, 2016 release of the State of Senior Hunger in America 2014 annual report
found that 12.41% of Maryland seniors overall face the threat of hunger. There is limited information
on the percentage of Montgomery County seniors who face the threat of hunger, but the Montgomery
County Senior Subcommittee on Vital Living found that in 2012, 8,060 Montgomery County seniors were
living below the poverty line, up 29.5% from 2009.
Putting an end to senior hunger and food insecurity in Montgomery County, MO requires a coordinated
effort and strategy, and Bill 19-16 deserves our Council's full support.
Sincerely,
Rose Clifford, RON, MBA
Nutrition Program Manager
lona Senior Services
4125 Albemarle St., NW
Washington, DC 20816
rclifford@iona.org
240-401-1311 mobile
2
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~
~
I
NTERFAITH
WORKS
STATEMENT OF SHANE C. ROCK
www.iworksmc.org
CEO, Interfaith Works
June
14,
2016
Re:611119-i6 - Strategic Plari to
End
Foodiosecurity
.'
Interfaith Works supports
Bill 19,,16,
which directs the County Innovation .officer to
craft a Strategic Plan to End Food Insecu(rtyin collaboration with the Montgomery
County Food Council, Manna, and a Wide variety
of
government. community, and
nonprofit organizations working to
increase
food
security.
and decrease poverty in our
oounty. Access to healthy, nutritious and sufficient
food
1s
a
vital prerequiSIte for
people to
lift
themselves out of poverty and become more self-sufficient.
Interfaith
Works
is
committed to empowering vulnerable people
to
lift
themselves out
of
Poverty. .one component Of that commitment is addre$Singfood security needs of
thQSe we
serve.
Our Project INFORM program, housed at the Inte.rfalth
WO~k$
Clothing Center in Rockvillejconnects families in need with vital resources•. Last year,
food security was their top need - more than
60
percent of the
443
people served
by
Project INFORM sought referrals for food assistance from our community partners. In
addition,
Interfaith Works voJunteers donated in excess
of
50,000
meals to feed
resldents
at
our Rockvillewomeo's shelter.
These examples underscore both the need in our community and the factthatthere
are many partners worki ng
J
n concert to address the food security needs of those
strugglingin our County. (nelusIon
of
diverse organizations and VOices In the planning
and implementation oUhe strategic plan
Will
be critical for the Success Ofthlsworthy
effort.
We
urge the CounCil to directthe county Innovation Officer
to
inClude
a
broad
arraY
of
orgal1iTcitiorls
that
not only refleet geographic diVersity, but also represent
grassroots efforts.
faith~based
efforts, and diverse populations.
Of course, drafting a realistic, effective plan
is
only the first step in the proGe$S.
Sufficient
resources
will
be
required
to implement the plan, and to
gather
the
data
neCessary
to
measure
the
impactofthe efforts. We applaud
the
Council for tncluding
data collection. analysis, and cost estimation in the ctiargefor the County Innovation
Officer. The CIO's reports
to
the Council should lncl.ude notonlythe government data
and cost estimates, but also those
of
the community and nonprofit organizations that
will.be doing much of
the
direct work
in
our communities.
We
are grateful for the leadership
of
Cooncilmember BerlIn.er
in
sponsoring
this
legiSlation, and for Counc.ilmembers Rice and Leventhal foroo--sponsoring.
This
legislation reflects the collective Will
o.f
the Montgomery County Council
to
address a
vita.l soCio-econQmicissue for too many of our County neighbors.
We
have an
opportunity to create a cohesive, thoughtful approach to ensure those struggling in
our community have enough to e a t '
..
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JEWS UNITED
fOIl;
JUSTICE
JEWS UNITED
FORJUSTICE
Hollande Levinson
Jews United for Justice
I 10 Ridgepoint Place
Gaithersburg, MD
20878
404-823-2404
Testimony in Support of Bill 19-16, Strategic Plan
to
End Food Insecurity
This written testimony in support of Bill
19-16
is submitted on behalf ofJews United for Justice, a volunteer
driven organization that leads Jews from Montgomery County, as well as in DC and Baltimore, to act on our
shared Jewish values through grassroots civic engagement.
JUFJ supports this bill because hunger and food insecurity are issues of justice. Currently, almost
78,000
individuals
in our county are food insecure. In a county as wealthy as ours, that is simply unacceptable.
We are please the bill includes our exiting non profits as central to the planning process. This is important to us.
Existing nonprofits with successful track records are central to this process. They are on the front lines and
know intimately the challenges we face, and they should be at the heart of any plan to address this critical issue.
Those leading the planning process shouldn't assume that "new" is "better." They should equally consider that
existing organizations simply need more resources and more
stable funding
sources to prOVide services to more
people in need-whether that's more multilingual staff or satellite locations in underserved areas, etc.
We also appreciate and want to emphasize the bill's charge
to
look at poverty more broadly, as we know that
food insecurity is inextricably linked with other aspects of poverty such as low wage jobs, lack of affordable
hOUSing, etc. Examining this intersectionality as part of the plan is crucial.
As you know, JUFJ strongly backed the Council in voting for a property
tax
increase, because it was simply the
only way to generate the revenue we need to address growing poverty and inequality in our community. As a
result, we would expect, moving forward, that the Council will appropriate adequate funds for the
solutions
the
plan suggests. For example, after investing so much in our schools, we should remind ourselves that kids can't
learn when they have unstable housing. They don't have enough support at home when parents are working two
and even three jobs to make ends meet. And of course kids can't learn when they are hungry.
Our Jewish tradition tells us we have a strong obligation to provide food for
all
of our community. As the great
Rabbi, Rambam. teaches us, in just one example of his Laws of Gifts to the Poor: "One who reaps his field should
not reap the whole field entirely but rather he should leave a little bit of standing grain for the poor at the edge of
@
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the field. as it is written, (Lev. 23:22) You shall not reap all the way to the edges of the field." He goes on to teach
that this obligation extends
to
not only all types of food producers but to each of us as individuals. That obligation
is so strong that he states, "A poor person whom you do not know. who says: 'I'm famished, feed mel-there is
no need to check up on him
to
see if it's a ruse, rather one should supply him with food."
We want to thank lead Sponsor Vice President Berliner and cosponsors, Councilmember Leventhal and
Councilmember Rice for their bold vision to end food insecurity in our County. Let's make it happen.
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t3Jmanna
.
food center
fighfing hunger
and
feeding hope in montgomery county
Testimony before the Montgomery County Council
in support of Bill 19-16, Health and Sanitation - Strategic Plan to End Food Insecurity
Presented June 14, 2016
President Floreen and members of the County Council, my name is Jackie DeCarlo, and I am
the Executive Director of Manna Food Center, an organization created by the community to
end hunger in Montgomery County.
I
am also a member of the Montgomery County Food
Council, on the board of Nonprofit Montgomery, and on the Advisory Council of Maryland
Hunger Solutions.
With a mission like ours Manna is, of course, very pleased to be part of this pUblic hearing.
would like to thank especially Vice President Berliner for his sponsoring of Bill 19-16 and the
co-sponsors on the HHS Committee, Council Member Leventhal and Council Member Rice.
I
know all three of you to be champions of our neighbors experiencing food insecurity.
I
would also like to recognize Council Members Eirich and Navarro for their leadership in
support of weekend bag programs for students experiencing food insecurity, Council Member
Hucker for his commitment to Community Food Rescue, and Council Members Katz and
Reimer for their interest in Farm to Food Bank.
I
also want to recognize President Floreen for
her leadership in protecting the social safety net during recent budget deliberations.
As the draft legislation states, estimates suggest as many as
78,000
of our neighbors do not
always know where their next meal is coming from in this great county. In the first three
quarters of this fiscal year, Manna had the honor of serving 29,339 of those individuals at least
once. 31% of the households who receive food from us monthly are headed by our ·elders, and
at the other end of the age spectrum, every week we reach 2,493 elementary school students
with healthy ingredients for family friendly meals. Our clients are as diverse and beautiful as
our county-44% identify as White, 35% as African American, and 6% as Asian. 34% of our
clients are Hispanic or Latino. 70% of the households Manna serves are headed by women.
Beyond statistics, we know our clients are often the working poor, under or unemployed and
unable to make ends meet, particularly if facing a medical or other crisis.
Given the complexity of hunger and poverty, and the range of individual circumstances, I am
fond of saying that no one agency will be able to end food insecurity. That is why a strategic
www.mannafood.org
240.268.2524
1
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plan focused on collective efforts is an important undertaking. Manna is proud stand with our
peers in the "anti-hunger space/, many of whom you are hearing from today. Our reach is
broadened
t~rough
collaborations such as:
• 256 agencies including congregations
l
government agencies
l
and social services
organizations regularly refer clients to Manna. These partnerships have resulted in
33,321 food orders so far this 'fiscal year.
• Our Smart Sacks weekend bag program operates in 60 MCPS elementary schools
through the efforts of 55 civic partners. We appreciate the recent support the Council
showed by investing in the coalition Manna formed with two other weekend bag
providers: KIND and Women Who Care Ministries.
• The Community Food Rescue network has also benefitted from Council support and
grew from 11 organizations to 20 in only one year
l
rescuing almost $5million worth of
food in 2015.
• Our Farm to Food Bank program has work with farmers such as Red Wiggler Community
Farm to support the local economy and workforce development
l
while also providing
fresh produce to our clients.
• In cooperation with Maryland Hunger Solutions
l
our new Food Stamp outreach is based
at our new office at Silver Spring United Method Church. In less than two months 40
households have received Food Stamp benefits.
• Manna/s work is made possible thanks to the contributions of
8 /000
individual and
institutional donors including local businesses
l
congregations
l
and private foundations.
Approximately 80% of our funding comes from sources, other than public funds.
Despite these alliances
l
food security is not yet a reality for all Montgomery County residents.
Manna supports the creation of a strategic plan that will be an essential element of the
Montgomery County Food Action Plan to be created by the Food Council. Manna Food Center
has several recommendations to strengthen the legislation:
1)
Include on the list of required organizations and entities to consult
l
individuals who
have the lived experience of food insecurity. For a strategic plan to truly be
successful it will need to be informed and shaped by those who have the most at
stake-the mothers of children at risk of going to school on Monday unprepared to
learn
l
the seniors who face multiple health concerns and barriers to accessing
nutritious
l
affordable food
l
the working families who never imagined themselves
relying on charitable aid. DHHS Director Ahluwalia often speaks of the safety net as a
trampoline that helps people bounce back. To achieve this vision
l
we must build on
the insights of people navigating the uncertain and unpredictable tight rope walk
from paycheck to paycheck.
240.268.2524
2@
www.mannafood.org
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2)
Instruct the Chief Innovation Officer to develop a strategic plan that is tied to global
and national efforts to end hunger. Manna has endorsed the
United Nation's Zero
Hunger Challenge
as well as the EPA and USDA's challenge to reduce food waste by
50%. The timetable for those efforts is 2030. The Montgomery County plan should
also incorporate key strategies of the Food and Research Action Centers 8 point plan
to end hunger in the United States. These global and national frameworks will
replicate a best practice of our local Campaign to End Veteran Homelessness: that
of learning from and utilizing models piloted in other communities.
3)
Another feature of the Veteran Homelessness campaign was its commitment to
interagency and multi stakeholder participation. The call for this legislation notes the
need for policy makers to "own" a strategic plan. In fact, the strategic plan needs a
not-for-profit co-owner who has community based, collaborative, operational
expertise in addressing hunger. Please consult the model of the Maryland
Partnership to End Childhood hunger, which was co-led by the Governor's Office and
a not-far-profit, Share Our Strength. Along these same lines, the County needs to
recognize that financial support of the plan is necessary but far from sufficient. This
effort will call upon private philanthropy, the business sector, and individuals to
invest and sustain the effort.
4)
The legislation should mandate that all goals, objectives and accountability measures
relate to and support broader anti-poverty efforts in the county, such as pursuing
Interfaith Works' goal to shrink the poverty rate to make Montgomery County the
lowest rated county in Maryland by 2022. Food insecurity is not a stand-alone issue
but a symptom of economic and societal inequities that need to be addressed
systemically and in concert with other issues of concern.
5)
Finally, we request that the County change the name of the legislation. Make this
the Food Security Bill as a bold declaration that in Montgomery County
" ...
all
people at all times
[will]
have access to sufficient, safe, nutritious food to maintain
a healthy and active life". That is the definition of food security created by the
United Nations. A positive, expansive vision of food security communicates the
intent of a plan that will make sure that across zip codes, neighborhoods, districts,
and regions we will move away from a scarcity mentality into creating a prosperous
community for all.,
www.mannafood.org
240.268.2524
3@jJ
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Council Members, this legislation alone will not end hunger, but it is a tremendously important
and ambitious start. The strategic plan will strengthen existing programs and generate new
solutions. It will galvanize existing supporters and attract new constituents. It will create
broader and deeper opportunities for residents to discover that the giving and receiving of
food builds new networks of community engagement. Manna is ready to work alongside our
peer agencies and county agencies to help co-create a Five Year Plan by December of this year.
Thank you for your support of Bill 19-16 and for the real prospect of a Food Secure
Montgomery County.
www.mannafood.org
240.268.2524
4@
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I
Maryland Hunger Solutions
~
Ending hunger and promoting well-being
Testimony on
Bi1l19~16,
before the Health and Sanitation Committee of the Montgomery
County Council
The Strategic Plan to End Food Insecurity
By
Michael
J.
Wilson, on behalf of Maryland Hunger Solutions
My name is Michael J. Wilson and I am the Director of Maryland Hunger Solutions, a
non-partisan, nonprofit with the single goal of eliminating hunger in the state of Maryland. A
project ofthe Food Research and Action Center (FRAC), we use advocacy, outreach, education
and collaboration and focus on utilizing the existing federal food and nutrition programs. We are
proud to share space with the other local community organizations and
anti~hunger
activists to
participate in this hearing. We believe that this is a good start to of the process of ending food
insecurity in the county, but with important provisions.
In
outline form, those provisions are -­
First
Montgomery County is not the first county to attempt to do this. Palm beach County
funded a county plan of nearly 100 pages (Here is a link, on the FRAC Website). It's worth
examining, not because Montgomery County Maryland and Palm Beach County Florida are
similar, but because some of the causes and responses to hunger are similar. Here in Maryland,
we have worked with specific jurisdictions and funders to create what we call a "Road Map to
Maximize Nutrition and Student Wellness through the Federal Nutrition Programs". There is a
Baltimore City version, a Howard County Version, and a Maryland State version. These are the
Road Maps for which there were funding, capacity, and local leadership to create. In addition,
our national organization, the Food research and Acton Center has developed a plan to end
hunger, with Eight Essential Strategies To End Hunger. While national in scope, they have
applicability to local anti-hunger efforts.
Second
It's important to understand the regional, state, and federal context which will impact
the plan. When the Maryland Farmer's Market Program raises money to fund the Maryland
Money program - to provide financial incentives for FSP and WIC recipients to spend their
benefits at local farmers markets, Montgomery County benefits. When the state legislature funds
a state supplement for households with a member 62 and over so they get more than $16 a month
- $16 a month - up to $30 a month, Montgomery County benefits. (Washington D.C. enacted a
similar program, and that also impacted Montgomery County.) When the welfare reform law of
the 1990s forces Maryland to give up its statewide waiver so that 8 jurisdiction has to impose
new time limits on so-called Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWDS) are limited to
711 W. 40th Street
I
Suite 360 Baltimore, MD 21211
phone 410.528.0021 email info@mdhungersolutions.org web www.mdhungersolutions.org
An
Initiative
of
the Food Research and Action Center
(f!j)
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receiving FSP benefits for 3 months in a 3 year period - Montgomery County is impacted
because 1561 residents faced those time limits. When the Congress of the United States in
considering legislation to relax nutrition standards for school meals, offering block grant school
meals, and wants to revisit the fonnula for community eligibility - well, Montgomery County is
affected. State and federal elected officials must also be a part of the plan, and the Washington
Area Council of Governments must also be a part of the plan, just as the Washington Area
Regional Association of Grantmakers has.
Third
-
it's critical to understand - and to address - the underlying causes ofhunger. There is a
simple one word answer as to why there is hunger; it's poverty.
And
Fourth
-
the plan must have enough flexibility, capacity and political support to adjust to
circumstances.
This is a long and complicated path. Many will testify before you today speaking of their
programs and the impact that they are making.
It
is all part of a broad tapestry, but beyond a
meal here and a meal there, the challenge of ending food insecurity takes commitment,
collaboration, and understanding. A success plan will include as many stakeholders as possible
and will be as robust, comprehensive, and inclusive as the county itself.
The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said, "I have the audacity to believe that people everywhere
can have three meals a day for their bodies, education and culture for the minds and dignity,
equality and freedom for their spirits."
# # #
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Written Testimony from
Susie Sinclair-Smith, Executive Director of Montgomery County Coalition for the Homeless·
In Support of
Bill 19-16,
Health and Sanitation - Strategic Plan to End Food Insecurity
Good Afternoon.
I am here today to express the Montgomery County Coalition for the Homeless' (MCCH) full
support of Bill 19-16 that would create a Strategic Plan to End Food Insecurity. Since food
insecurity touches all 1700 clients that MCCH serves each year in our emergency and
permanent supportive housing, MCCH applauds the MC Council for proposing a strategic
approach to eradicate the unacceptable condition of hunger in our County. I believe tackling
this problem is possible based upon my recent involvement with the County's successful Zero
2016 campaign to end veteran homelessness, resulting in Montgomery County becoming one
of only four communities nationwide to reach functional zero for homeless veterans.
The Zero: 2016 campaign's success was based on four key elements, which if replicated, will be
instrumental in a community-wide strategic effort to address food insecurity.
These four elements were:
• The political will to address the issue,
• A time-bound sense of urgency,
• Identification of necessary strategic system changes and allocation of resources
accordingly, and
• A public-private partnership.
Bill 19-16 includes the first three elements - a clear demonstration of the political will needed
to create real and lasting change; time bound goals that create urgency for the plan; and
recognition of the need for systemic change as evident in the bill's requirement to gather input
from a variety of entities in the public and private sectors.
MCCH recommends that the public-private partnership that was essential in ending veteran
homelessness be added as an element in the plan and its eventual implementation taking into
consideration the many ways our community feeds people who experience food insecurity.
MCCH volunteers donated furniture, household necessities, and 2 weeks of food for each
veteran when they moved into permanent housing. Also, MCCH could not operate our men's
emergency shelter without the significant support of our community which donated more than
100,000 meals last year - over 70% of all meals served.
While MCCH ensures that our clients in our emergency programs receive 3 meals a day
throughout the year, I want to speak on behalf of the 400 households in our permanent
supportive housing programs. These clients are amongst the most vulnerable residents in our
community and rely on food stamps and local food pantries. But despite the best efforts of
everyone involved in addressing hunger, our clients regularly ask case managers for help getting
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more food. Food stamps for a single person with no income, which is a reality for some MCCH
clients, only provides $6.16 per day for food. And though we are truly grateful for our partners
such as Manna and other local food pantries, they are forced to limit our clients' access to food
due to their funding limitations. Our clients are further challenged by their lack of access to
foods that are fresh, unprocessed, and lower in sugar and sodium. Given their health issues,
they need more of these kinds of foods but are forced to consume less healthy options based
on what they can access and afford.
The experience of homeless is integrally related to the experience of food insecurity.
Montgomery County's Self Sufficiency wage standard the income that a household needs to live
in Montgomery County accounting for the costs of rent, food, medical and child care,
transportation and taxes. Without public assistance, annually a single mother with an infant
and toddler needs to make $78,000; and a single adult needs a job paying $36,000. If someone
experiences a medical crisis or loses the job, difficult household choices need to be made about
spending priorities often at the expense of buying food or paying rent.
I urge you to support Bill 19-16 so that we can create a community where everyone has a safe,
stable and affordable place to call home and no one is forced to go hungry.
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MONTG01vfERY COUNTY
FOOD COUNCIL
June 14,2016
MONTGOMERY COUNTI FOOD COUNCIL TESTIMONY IN SUPPORT OF BILL 19-16
Good afternoon. My name is Heather Bruskin and I am the Manager of the Montgomery County Food Council. Thank you
to Councilmember Berliner for introducing this innovative and ambitious legislation, and to Councilmembers Leventhal
and Rice for your support of this important effort.
The Montgomery County Food Council is an independent council that serves as the primary connection point for all
stakeholders interested in improving the environmental, economic, social, and nutritional health of the County through the
creation of a robust, sustainable local food system. The Food Council is named in the bill as a lead collaborator in the
development of the Strategic Plan, and we agree that the plan's creation is essential to the development of a better understanding
of current food security initiatives, to the identification of existing gaps and overlaps, and to the maximization of the impact of
the funding invested in food system work.
Food system reform is active world\\ide, and Montgomery County is uniquely positioned to be a regional and national
leader in alleviating hunger arid creating a truly sustainable local food system. While our County faces challenges, we also
have the resources and political support for transformational change that
will
not only eradicate hunger, but also promote
health and increase food equity.
By
reducing redundancies and maximizing collaboration, we can move forward with a more efficient, strategic plan to
address food insecurity and the related
L..~ues
affecting our residents. We believe that the issue of hunger cannot be
examined or addressed independently of the full food system, and economic landscape, of our county. Food Access and
Recovery, Food Economy, Food Literacy, and the environmental impact of food production and waste, are all inextricably
linked. Food insecurity is a Significant symptom of a deeper problem, and it is essential that we take a comprehensive
systems approach to our action plan. The developing food access crisis in Eastern Montgomery County, where the closure of
one food retailer has transferred the responsibility for providing nutritious food to local residents to hunger relief
organizations that are already stretching their limited resources, is an excellent example of the need to strengthen
connectivity in our entire food system. While existing local, State, and Federal emergency food assistance programs playa
central and essential role in addressing hunger in our County, funding for these resources is not entirely rellable in the long
term. Without addressing the true root causes of food insecurity in our County, we \\ill be unable to establish a truly
sustainable solution to this issue.
The Food Council has the most comprehensive understanding of the full food cycle in Montgomery County, enabling us to lead
this important t:ffort in collaboration \\ith a wide range of established partners, including our over 100 Council and Working
Group members who represent private foundations, non-profits, government agencies, community organizations, and local
businesses. We \\illieverage these existing relationships to develop a plan that represents the collective expertise, needs, and
growth opportunities of not only our hunger-related partners but also those addressing poverty, workforce and economic
4825 Cordell Avenue, Suite 204
I
fr
Bethesda, MD 20814
I
806.395.5593
mocofoodcouncil.org·1 info@mocofoodcounciLorg
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development. agricultural production, education, and iand and water use. Our strong partnerships \'lith the
Food Policy
CounciL Prince George's Food Equity Council, dle Chesapeake Foodshed Network, and others, are also essential to maximize
oppormnities for food policy and distribution within the regional value chain.
There
is
currently no existing comprehensive picture of the breadth and depth of hunger relief and food system work being
done in our County. In order to create a more comprehensive, strategic vision for all food system work in Montgomery
County, in 2016, thanks to the generous financial support of the County Council and the County Executive, the Food
Council began work on the significant task of creating a Food Action Plan, which involves conducting a thorough
assessment of the current state of food system work and establishing a long-term strategy for addressing existing issues and
gaps in effort. This plan v..ill serve as a tool for identifying opportunities and understanding how those opportunities can be
implemented in policy and practice.
It
will identify goals, ultimate strategies for achieving these goals, necessary changes,
actions to take, and metries to gauge success. This effort v..ill build upon the findings of our Montgomery County
Community Food Access Report, released in October 2015, a three year research effort that identified six communities of
low food access as well as the primary challenges to food access in our County, including transportation, income inequality,
language barriers, a.nd a lack of culturally appropriate foods. Also, our comprehensive assessment of all emergency food and
food literacy resource providers in our County is already underway, an essential first step in the creation of a plan to address
Food Insecurity. And, our Food Hub study, funded with generous support from the County Council in FY16, is about to be
released \\-ith significant insight into the economic opportunities available to increase food production and access in our
County.
The Food Council is tremendously appreciative of the support and attention to this issue. We also commend the County's
past and current significant commitment to mitigating food insecurity and other food system issues, and echo the
importance of deploying these resources strategically, with a comprehensive vision in' mind: The Food Council looks
forward to working with our partners to strengthen the tremendous existing food access work in Montgomery County, and
to the opportunity to incorporate these diverse, experienced perspectives to develop a comprehensive and implementable
strategy for achieving our common goal of food security for all in Montgomery County.
Heather Bruskin
Manager
Montgomel.)' County Food Council
4825 Cordell Avenue, Suite 204
mocofoodcouncil.org
I
Bethesda, MD 20814
I
806.395.5593
I
info@mocofoodcouncil.org
fr
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Advancing Social Change Worldwide
Testimony of Andy Burness, President, Burness; and Chair, Montgomery County Food
Security Collaborative in support of Bill 19-16, Strategic Plan to End Food Insecurity
June 14, 2016
I am Andy Burness, Chair of the Montgomery County Food Security Collaborative, a group of
organizations encouraging collaborative solutions to significantly reduce hunger in our county by
2020. For the last 30 years, I have led a local business in Bethesda. Our clients are local, national
and global, and many are involved in the fight against hunger.
Two years ago, I joined with a group of volunteers to go on a "food recovery" - working through
the wonderful Food Recovery Network at the University of Maryland. That night, we filled
perhaps 25 large plastic bins of food and delivered them to a women's shelter. When we got
there, we found to our amazement that six bins filled with food from a previous drop-off were
sitting on the kitchen counter, uneaten. We didn't know what to do. How can you bring fresh,
delicious food to a shelter and then take it back? But, conversely, how can you leave that food
for the women in the shelter, knowing that most of it will go to waste and others who need that
food won't get it?
I was once again reminded of a life lesson that evening -namely that doing good in and of itself
is not guaranteed to help the people we're all trying to help. And that data is critical to tackling
issues related to poverty, because if you don't know who is hungry, it's impossible to target the
people with the greatest need.
System reform is not terribly sexy, but in the end, systems are necessary for solving our big
problems. Nobody cheers at the prospect of collaboration, but Individual acts of generosity,
disconnected from a larger plan, help a child or a veteran or a shut-in, but they don't solve the
bigger problem of hunger.
That's why I enthusiastically support today's legislation. It's about system reform.
It calls on the County to develop a plan and insists that all people with an interest in or.
responsibility for solving hunger step up and coordinate efforts.
It says that data rules, that we need to know who is hungry, how many are hungry, and where
they live. It holds the County accountable with real metrics - reducing food insecurity by
10
per
cent each year, starting in
2017.
7910
Woodmont Avenue, Suite
700,
Bethesda, MD
20814
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2
Advancing Social Change Worldwide
It requires strange bedfellows who may hardly know each other to be problem solvers together
- food assistance groups, anti-poverty advocates, school leaders, county planners,
transportation experts, information technology experts, caterers, public health officials. And
restaurants, hospitals, grocery stores, colleges and universities, where unused food is too often
wasted, are critical as well.
It says that any solution that is developed in isolation is not a solution that will ultimately reduce
the ranks of hungry people in Montgomery County.
This legislation is government at its best - involving all people working on one part of the
elephant to come together to create a plan and then deliver on it. It won't solve poverty, the
real villain in this story. But it will take our fight against hunger to a new moral ground, with
insistence that we do our best to reduce the number of hungry neighbors - starting with a plan.
Basic food security for all of our neighbors is a challenge we are clearly up to. Thank you for
your leadership and your insistence on results.
burness.com
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montgomery
. Strategic Plan to End Food Insecurity Testimony
Wednesday, June 14, 2016
nonprofit
Council President Floreen and Councilmembers,
Thank you for the opportunity to share Nonprofit Montgomery's support of Bill 19-16,
which will create a strategic plan to address hunger and food insecurity.
First, thank you to Councilmember Berliner for his sponsorship of this Bill, and
Councilmembers Leventhal and Rice for their co-sponsorship.
Nonprofit Montgomery is an alliance of 126 nonprofit organizations serving
~ontgomery
County residents. While our day-to-day work strengthens leadership in the nonprofit
sector through leadership development, peer-to-peer networking, and strategic
partnerships, the overarching reason for the work we do is that strong non profits
contribute to a thriving, just, and fair Montgomery County.
Hunger and food insecurity are issues that are central to a just and fair society. More
than ten of Nonprofit Montgomery's 126 members are directly involved in hunger relief
programs, including most of those who are'offering testimony today, and many more of
our members partner with hunger-relief organizations to serve clients they see for
intersecting issues like housing, health care, mental health care, job training, legal
services, and after-school programs, all of which relate to poverty and economic
opportunity.
This legislation calls for the Chief Innovation Officer to consult with cross-sector leaders
and organizations, including Manna Food Center and the Montgomery County Food
Council, both members of Nonprofit Montgomery. We applaud this, and also support
consultation with many other nonprofit, community-based, and faith-based organizations
of all sizes, budgets, and focuses, especially those that are grassroots organizations
serving our most vulnerable communities. Diverse voices across multiple sectors are
important to solve our most pressing problems.
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We urge that they be fully included in this planning process, and that once the planning
process concludes, we encourage their inclusion as full partners for implementation. For
this plan to succeed, it must be owned by ALL of its participants.
This will, of course, take resources. A coordinated system to address a large issue like
this requires a common agenda, shared measurement, continuous communication, data
collection, consistent outcomes evaluation, and much more. Many of our small, and
even some of our large organizations struggle with capacity to collect data, measure
outcomes, and communicate success because their resources are devoted to direct
service. We must ensure that the investment of resources called for when this plan is
released includes resources to support full participation in a collective effort.
Addressing food insecurity and hunger is only one part of a much larger charge that we
as a county must address...the growing economic opportunity gap and the reality of
poverty. I hope that the framework being used to develop, and eventually implement this
Strategic Plan will be a model for similar frameworks to significantly reduce poverty in
the county, and look forward to supporting those into the future.
Brigid Nuta Howe
Executive Director
Nonprofit Montgomery
www.nonprofitmoco.org
brigid@nonprofitmoco.org
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Testimony: Brett Meyers
June 14,2016
My name is Brett Meyers and I am the Founder and Executive Director of Nourish Now. Nourish Now is a food
recovery based organization located in Rockville, Maryland.
When I was 18 years old I moved out of my home which fortunately I never had to worry about food. That was
true until I was a college student trying to live off of $75 a week. I experienced what it was like to not have food
in my refrigerator and much worse not having the money to fill it up.
Fortunately for me the moments of food insecurity I faced were brief, but I never forgot them. Everyone faces
ups and downs in their lives, whether you live in a mansion or experiencing homelessness, but food is the one
thing we all cannot live without.
Unfortunately, 77,780 people suffer from food insecurity in Montgomery County. That is enough people to fill a
football stadium to its capacity. Enough fresh food is wasted each day to also fill a football stadium to its
capacity. How can one of the wealthiest counties in the nation have this many people in need of the most basic
thing we all need to survive. All of us have a goal to thrive in our lives, to make the best of what's around, and
with all the obstacles that can get in the way, it is very hard to imagine adding hunger while trying to pursue my
life's dreams.
One of the reasons I created Nourish Now was to do everything I could to help people in need not experience
hunger.
After 5 years of operations, my organization Nourish Now is doing everything we possibly can to help solve this
issue. Nourish Now recovers over 25,000 pounds of food that would otherwise be wasted each month. Every
family we donate to receives restaurant quality food from our 130 food donor partners. We give food donations
to over 50 County agencies to help support their food budgets. In 2015, Nourish Now saved out partner
organizations over $150,000 in food costs. Nourish Now also provides food donations to over 500 families in
need monthly. Collaboration began with our first food donation five years ago and I am excited about the
possibilities of collaboration this bill could bring. I hope the planning and the execution of this major endeavor
will focus on the strengths each organization can bring and together we will make a positive change to our
County as it relates to ending food insecurity. I hope Nourish Now will be asked to be a part of this Countywide
plan. All of us at Nourish Now are looking forward to playing as large a role as possible in this effort. Please
feel free to reach out to us anytime and thank you for this opportunity to speak today.
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Shepherd's
Table
TOGETHER MEETING NEEDS. CHANGING LIVES.
\~
Public Testimony for Bill 19 - 16
President Floreen, Vice President Berliner, and members of the County Council, my
name is Jacki Coyle and I am the Executive Director of Shepherd's Table, an
organization committed to meeting the basic human needs of men and women
experiencing homelessness and poverty in Silver Spring and Montgomery County. I
am also
a
member of the Food Access and Recovery Group of the Montgomery
County Food Council. Shepherd's Table is very proud to be a part of Community
Food Rescue. I am proud to have served as Chair of the County Council working·
group on Food Recovery, which gave birth to a more coordinated and effective effort
to recover food: Community Food Rescue.
Shepherd's Table has been meeting the needs of individuals experiencing
homelessness and poverty for 33 years. We have serve thousands of hungry people
serving over 1.5 million meals. We are honored to be part of
this
public hearing. I
. would like to thank especially Council Member Berliner for
his
sponsoring of BILL
#
19 - 16 and his co-sponsors on the HHS Committee, Council Member Leventhal and .
Council Member Rice. Your passion to meet the needs of
all
in our County,
especially the most vulnerable,
is
a testament to the heart and soul of the County
Council!
As we prepare to move into our new building in December of
this
year, I thank each
Council member for your vision and commitment to ensure that essential and life
giving services are provided
in
Silver Spring. to women and men experiencing poverty
and homelessness. The new building gives Shepherd's Table the opportunity to
double its impact
in
the community by doubling the number of meals we serve each
week!
As the draft legislation states, estimates suggest as many as 78,000 of our neighbors do
not always know where their next meal is coming from in this great County. In the
firstS months of
this
year, Shepherd's Table has served over 1,008 unduplicated
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Greater Washington, DC
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8210 Dixon Avenue I
Silver Spring,
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209101301-585-6463
I FAX
301-585-47181 shepherdstable.org
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persons and over 22,000 meals. The number of new people coming to us in this same
time period is 333. While many of our meal guests are homeless, 8 % are housed but
. are living in poverty. Another 27% live with family or friends in very vulnerable
situations. Each day, they must decide how they
will
pay living expenses, how they
will
buy food, and if they
will
be able to maintain their housing. Many of this group
are senior citizens. Our clients are as diverse, as is this County-ll
%
identify as
White, 55% as African American, and 4% as Asian. 37% of our clients are Hispanic
or Latino. 85% of the people we serve are men and 15% are women. All who seek
services; especially meals, are people experiencing food insecurity. All are HUNGRYl
How
will
we end hunger in Montgomery County?
Just as your legislation states, the plan to end hunger must be one that is a
collaborative effor"4 with County govemmen"4 nonprofits, schools, businesses,
organizations, individuals all working together to simply diminish food insecurity but
to ensure that EVERYONE is FOOD SECURE.
Currendy, Shepherd's Table works in partnership with the County and many other
organizations, businesses and individuals. Because of this, we are able to ensme that
who walk through our door, an average of 140 people per day, are provided a
nutritious meal. The results of our strong partnerships ensme that not only are people
fed a nutritious meal, but because of these meals they are able to maintain or improve
their health and also are able to take the necessary steps to improve their lives.
an
We regularly work hand in hand with Manna, the Capital Area Food Bank,
Community Food Rescue, Interfaith Works, 11ontgomery County Coalition for the
Homeless, over 35 faith communities, 3 Farmer's Markets, over 15 businesses and
coundess other organizations and individuals.
Each year, over 135,000 pounds of recovered food finds its way into our
extraordinarily delicious and nutritious meals which are served to our dinner and
brunch guests.
Through the generosity of Maryland Emergency Food Program grants, other
Foundation grants, as well as business and individual donations, we are able to
purchase much-needed food to supplement the food that is donated.
Local businesses or groups provide what we call a BRIGHT Meal throughout the
year. This is an opportunity for the business to choose special food for the dinner or
®
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brunch meal, pay for the food, and provide volunteers to serve the meal. These
BRIGHT meals give our meal guests a special meal, just like those all of us enjoy
when we go out to dinner or brunch.
Shepherd's Table is poised to experience the most important time in our 33 year
history. With the move into the new Progress Place in December of this year, we
will
double the amount of meals serve as we become the sole provider of meals. We
will
go from providing 9 meals to 19 meals each week. We anticipate serving over 100,000
meals
in
2017. We
will
double our impact on the lives of those we serve and double
our impact in the community! Many more people
will
be fed. Fewer people
will
be
hungry. We
will
continue to play our part in making this County one that is food
secure for all.
While we are most proud that we serve all who walk through our doors a nutritious
meal, we know that hunger and food insecurity remain in Montgomery County. We
support the creation of a strategic plan to address and ultimately eliminate food
insecurity in our County.
We, along with Manna and other providers suggest a change in the name of the
legislation. Make the bill about Food Security for ALL. The definition of food security
by the World Health organization states: " ...
all
people at
all
times.
Twill]
have
access to sufficient, safe, nutritious food to maintain a healthy and active life"
We believe that seeking to simply reduce food insecurity by 10% a year falls short of
the vision needed to end food insecurity and to ensure FOOD SECURITY for ALL.
Be BOLD in your vision and confidant in your belief that working together we can
ensure food security for all.
We believe that learning lessons and gleaning knowledge from national and global
efforts in ending hunger and ensuring food security
will
allow us
to
move more
efficiently. Every day that people in this County and throughout our world experience
hunger is a bad day for all of us!
We are proud to be a part of Montgomery County, a County that has stood at the
forefront of change that significantly bettered people's lives. Just recently working and
succeeding at ending Veteran Homelessness proved that a passionate, committed
County
in
collaboration with equally committed organizations and stakeholders could
effect change. Together we can end food insecurity and bring Food Security to
all.
We support this legislation, knowing that it not only continues the commitment of the
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Council to significantly care for the lives of all its citizens but also that it is a Bold
initiative to do what is seemingly impossible, to ensure FOOD SECURITY for all
It
continues to bring together the best minds, the biggest hearts, and the best practices
nationally and globally to end HUNGER
Shepherd's Table is ready to work in partnership with the County, other agencies, and
the many businesses and individuals who
will
be needed to ensure Food Security for
everyone!
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\';
Testimony for
Bill 19-16
From Women Who Care Minstries
Presented
by:
Judith Clark, Executive Director
June 14, 2016
I am Judie Clark, Executive Director of Women Who Care Ministries and we are happy to give testimony
today, in support of Bill 19-16.
For over
15
years we have had the privilege of providing safety net services to vulnerable members of our
community in Montgomery County.
One of the primary services we provide is food, through our Montgomery Village Food Center and
through our Helping Kids Eat Weekend Meal Program. Although both of these programs are flourishing,
still there are too many families and children going to bed hungry. That's why we're excited about this
Bill.
Needless to say, the issue of food insecurity is of great concern to us. Through providing weekend meals
to children in both elementary and middle school, our awareness to hunger and its underlying causes has
increased tremendously in the past decade. There are so many other family issues at hand that lead to
child hunger, and to household food insecurity that we are hoping this bill will address.
I'm talking about Issues such as incarceration, unemployment, domestic violence, lack of knowledge of
County resources, lack of knowledge of process to tap into these resources, overcoming pride, and many
other hindering forces.
Therefore, we are looking forward to this bill being comprehensive, wherein, although the primary focus is
to end hunger and food insecurity, the overlapping ancillary factors are taken into great consideration as
well. After all, a chain is only as strong as it's weakest link.
As food providers we realize we can do a lot of work with seeing to it that meals get into the hands of our
clients, but if we are not exploring the root causes of their hunger, in a solution-focused manner, we are
just putting a band aid on the problem consequently the problem, hunger and food insecurity never goes
away. Matter of fact, often times feelings of deprivation cause our clients to over indulge in food because
they are still very fearful of where their next meal will come from.
We are hopeful this bill will address how we can work with other agencies to alleviate the psychologic
barriers that bar our clients from embracing the concept of being able to live a life free from food
insecurity, even in their low income state.
In summary, we would like to see these aspects being implemented through the bill:
1) Thorough research and review of best practices from other counties and states, to be
complemented by what we are already doing well.
2) We would like this bill to offer increased focus of non-participation of eligible families in the SNAP
program, and getting to the root cause of why. Most often it's because it is difficult for them to fill
out the form or go online to register themselves. A couple of months ago a new client apprised
us she had been denied food stamps and temporary cash assistance. The reason was because
she had lost her birth certificate and didn't have the funds to order another one. We ordered it for
her that same day and a couple of weeks later she was receiving over $500 month combined
SNAP and cash assistance.
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Page Two
Women Who Care Ministries Testimony
For Bill 19-16
June 14, 2016
3) Emphasis on client participation and responsibility. We would like to see the Bill implement systems
designed to allow the consciousness of the recipients to make a dramatic switch from what we as
providers can do for them to what part can they play to help themselves reach self-sufficiency. This
includes offering financialliteracy/management skills classes; which includes budgeting their
resources. Incentives for these classes; a certificate - a gift card, will go a long way and will greatly
reduce food insecurity. Through our experience, our clients who submit to increasing their financial
management skills are less likely to be food insecure, conditional on other factors. This also
reduces the feelings of entitlement many of our clients have. IThis includes encouraging those who
are employable to get a part time job, to the point that it does not affect their monthly benefits, etc.
Most of our clients don't want a hand out, but a hand up. They want to be self-sufficient and not
depend on the assistance more than necessary.
4) Also, although SNAP and WIC are among the primary programs implemented to aid food
insecurity, we are hopeful that this bill will not overlook that thousands of food insecure residents
are ineligible for
SNAP.
This is why our food banks are so critical, as they are the only source of
food assistance to the households that are ineligible for
SNAP
and other federal food assistance
programs.
Women Who Care Ministries' goal is to put ourselves out of a job through this fierce fight to end hunger,
so we can then go about focusing on some of the many other issues of our vulnerable residents that we
can help heal.
Women Who Care Ministries looks forward to the passing of this Bill, and collaborating and strategizing
with our community partners in playing a vital role in the shapin& molding and effectiveness of it.
Thank you for your time.