Agenda Item 7A
April 18,2017
Action
MEMORANDUM
April 14, 2017
TO:
FROM:
SUBJECT:
County Council
Amanda Mihill, Legislative Attorney
CCHld)Yiu~u
Action:
Bill 1-17, Contracts and Procurement - Vending Machine Service
Contracts - Healthy Vending Standards
Government Operations and Fiscal Policy Committee recommendation (3-0):
enact Bill
1-17 with a technical amendment.
Bill 1-17, Contracts and Procurement - Vending Machine Service Contracts - Healthy Vending
Standards, sponsored by Lead Sponsor Councilmember Leventhal and Co-Sponsor Councilmember
Rice, Council President Berliner, Councilmember Navarro, Council Vice-President Riemer and
Councilmembers EIrich and Hucker, was introduced on February 7, 2017. A public hearing was
held on February 28 and a Government Operations and Fiscal Policy Committee worksession was
held on March 30.
Bill 1-17 would require certain vending machine service contracts the County enters into to adhere
to certain nutrition standards, and labeling and product placement requirements. Under Bil11-17,
all new vending machine contracts entered into must require:
• all food or beverage items offered for sale be less than 0.5 grams of trans-fat per serving
an no more than 200 milligrams of sodium per package; and
• any beverage offered for sale be less than 250 calories or 20 fluid ounces.
These nutrition requirements would go into effect for any vending machine service contract
entered into on or after the date of enactment of the legislation. In addition, the bill sets forth
certain "healthy vending standards" (©2-3, lines 17-40). Any vending machine service contract
entered into on or after July 1, 2017 must require at least 50% of the food and beverage items
offered for sale meet the healthy vending standards. This increases to 65% for any vending
machine service contract entered into after July 1, 2018.
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
Background
The County's current service contract with the vending machine company that stocks county
vending machines has specifications for healthy snack offerings (see excerpt attached on © 12-13).
There are some differences between the contract and Bill 1-1 7. For instance:
• Contract requires that SO% of all the items in the snack machine be no more than 200
calories per package, less than O.S g trans fat, and no more than 200 mg sodium. The
contract has a "goal" of increasing the SO% to 90%. The bill requires that 100% of snack
food meet this criteria for any contract entered into after the date of enactment.
• In addition the basic requirement in the previous paragraph, the bill and contract contain
similar language requiring no more than
3S%
of calories from total fat; no more than 10%
of calories from saturated fat; and no more than
3S%
of calories from total sugars. The
contract requires SO% of snack items to meet this additional requirement with the goal of
90% by the end of the contract term.
In
contrast, the bill requires SO% for any service
contract entered into after July 1, 2017 and
6S%
for any service contract entered into after
July 1,2018.
• The contract has specification regarding grain products and product placement and number
of slots for certain snack foods.
The last contract for vending services contract was executed in April 2016. Committee members
may wish to inquire as to the status of implementing the healthy vending requirements of the
contract with staff from the Department of General Services.
Summary of Testimony/Correspondence
The overwhelming majority of testimony and correspondence the Council has received was
supportive of Bill 1-17 (see testimony and correspondence on ©14-36). The Council received over
100 letters from constituents supporting Bill 1-17 and rather than reprint them all in this packet,
Council staff has attached a sample letter, from one constituent, that is representative of most of
the individual correspondence received (©37). The American Beverage Association testified at the
hearing that the Association, while not supportive of the bill, did not object to it either
14-17).
Subsequently, the Beverage Association representative noted that there are some (though Council
staff confirmed not all) products that are manufactured, produced, and bottled at a Silver Spring
facility that will be prohibited from being stocked in vending machines in County facilities under
the language of the bill. Finally, The Greater Silver Spring Chamber of Commerce submitted
testimony noting that the Chamber has a company that owns and operates vending machines in
private venues in the County and that this member has expressed concern that the bill would
discourage him and other companies from doing business with the County
(©2S).
Council staff understands that the County Executive supports the bill.
2
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
Issues!
Committee Recommendation
There are no significant substantive issues that staff has identified for Committee discussion.
Council staff understands that the Department of General Services does not have any issues or
concerns with the bill and have already incorporated it in the new vending machine contract.
There is a technical amendment that Council staff believes is necessary for consistency in the bill
(©2, lines 14-15), and which the Committee supported:
This Article applies only to County vending [[machines located on property owned
Qy
the
County]] machine service contracts.
Committee recommendation
(3-0):
enact Bill 1-17 with this technical amendment.
This packet contains:
Bi1l1-17
Legislative Request Report
Sponsor memorandum
Fiscal and Economic Impact statements
Current County Contract
Select Correspondence and Testimony
American Beverage Association
American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network
American Diabetes Association
American Heart Association
Center for Science in the Public Interest
Greater Silver Spring Chamber of Commerce
Montgomery County Food Council
Montgomery County, MD Medical Society
NAACP
Real Food for Kids - Montgomery
Sugar Free Kids Maryland
Individuals
Sample Letter
Circle #
1
6
7
8
12
14
18
20
21
23
25
26
28
29
30
32
33
37
F:\LA w\BILLS\170l Healthy Vending\Action Memo.Docx
3
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
Bill No.
1-17
Concerning: Contracts and Procurement
- Vending Machine Service Contracts
- Healthy Vending Standards
Draft N o . l
Revised:
4/10/2017
Introduced:
February 7, 2017
Expires:
August 7,2018
Enacted: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Executive: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Effective: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Sunset Date: .......:....::N=on=e"-:-_ _ _ _ __
Ch, _ _, Laws of Mont. Co. _ _ __
COUNTY COUNCIL
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND
Lead Sponsor: Councilmember Leventhal
Co-Sponsors: Councilmember Rice, Council President Berliner, Councilmember Navarro,
Council Vice President Riemer, and Councilmembers EIrich and Hucker
AN
ACT to:
(a)
(b)
require certain vending machine service contracts the County enters into to adhere to
certain nutrition standards, and labeling and product placement requirements; and
generally amend County procurement law.
By adding
Montgomery County Code
Chapter
11
B, Contracts and Procurement
i\rticle J(lfIII
Sections lIB-7S, lIB-79, lIB-SO, lIB-Sl, and lIB-S2
Boldface
Underlining
[Single boldface brackets]
Double underlining
[[Double boldface brackets]]
* * *
Heading or defined term.
Added to existing law by original bill.
Deletedfrom existing law by original bill.
Added by amendment.
Deletedfrom existing law or the bill by amendment.
Existing law unaffected by bill.
The County Council for Montgomery County, Maryland approves the following Act:
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
BILL
No.
1-17
1
Sec.
1.
Article XVllI (Sections 11B-78, 11B-79, 11B-80, 11B-81, and
11B-82) is added as follows:
Article
XVIII.
Vending Machine Service Contracts.
11B-78. Definitions.
As used in this Article, the following terms have the meanings indicated:
2
3
4
5
6
7
Packaged
means bottled, canned, securely bagged, or securely wrapped,
whether packaged in g food establishment or g food processing plant.
8
Vending machine
means g self-service machine offered for public use that, upon
insertion of g coin, paper, currency, token, card, or key, or
Qy
optional manual
operation, dispenses servings of food or beverages in bulk or in packages, or
prepared
Qy
the machine, without the necessity of replenishing the device
between each vended operation
9
10
11
12
13
11B-79. Applicability.
This Article applies only to County vending [[machines located on property
owned
Qy
the County]] machine service contracts.
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
11B-80. Healthy vending standards.
{ill
An item designated as g healthy food choice must contain:
ill
ill
ill
ill
no more than 200 calories per package;
less than 35% oftotal calories from fat, except for foods containing
100% nuts or seeds with no added fats;
less than 10% of calories from saturated fat; and
no more than 35% ofcalories from total sugars, except for 1%,20/0,
or non-fat dairy products, non-dairy milk products, fruits, and
vegetables.
22
23
24
25
ill
At least one healthy food choice offered in g vending machine must meet
the Food and Drug Administration's defInition of "low sodium".
26
o
f:\law\bills\1701 healthy vending\bill3 committee.docx
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
BILL
No. 1-17
27
W
@
Except as provided in paragraph
@1
an item designated as
~
healthy
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
beverage choice must contain fewer than 40 calories per serving.
The following beverages may also be designated as
choice:
~
healthy beverage
ill
ill
ill
fat-free or 1
%
low fat dairy milk;
calcium or vitamin D fortified soy milk with less than 200 calories
per container;
~
container with 12 ounces or less of:
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
(A)
ill.)
1000/0
fruit juice;
vegetable juice that contains less than 230 milligrams of
sodium per serving; or
ffJ
fruit juice combined with water with no added caloric
sweeteners and no more than 200 milligrams of sodium per
container.
IlB-81. Vending machine service contract requirements.
ill)
Any new vending machine service contract or vending machine service
contract renewal the County enters into on or after
{date
gf
enactment}
must require the following:
42
43
44
45
ill
Any packaged food or beverage item offered for sale in
~
vending
machine contain:
(A)
ill.)
less than 0.5 grams of trans-fat per serving; and
no more than 200 milligrams of sodium per package.
46
47
48
49
ill
Any beverage offered for sale in
£!
vending machine must not
contain
- - - -
more than:
250 calories; or
20 fluid
- - -
ounces.
50
51
52
@
f:\law\bills\1701 healthy vending\bill 3 committee.docx
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
BILL
No. 1-17
53
54
55
ill
ill
Water without added caloric sweeteners must be stocked in
beverage vending machine.
~
Food and beverage items that meet the nutrition requirements in
Section 11B-80
- - - -
must be:
(A)
displayed in
~
56
57
way that is distinguishable from food and
58
59
60
beverage items that do not meet those requirements; and
(ill
stocked in positions with highest selling potential, as
determined by the Director of the Department of General
Services.
61
62
63
ill
Food and beverage items that meet the nutrition requirements in
Section 11B-80 must be comparatively priced or less expensive
than products that do not meet those standards.
64
65
66
67
68
[§)
Vending machines must display nutritional labeling that complies
with the standards for nutritional labeling set forth in 21 Code of
Federal Regulations, Sections 101 and 109, or any successor
prOVIsIon.
69
70
71
ru
In addition to the requirements of paragraph
fu1
any new vending
machine service contract or vending machine service contract renewal the
County enters into on or after July
L.
2017 must require that at least 50%
ofthe food and beverage items offered for sale in vending machines meet
the requirements in Section 11B-80.
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
(£)
In
addition to the requirements of paragraph
fu1
any new vending
machine service contract or vending machine service contract renewal
that the County enters into on or after July
L.
2018 must require that at
least 65% of the food and beverage items offered for sale in vending
machines meet the requirements in Section 11B-80.
o
f:\law\bills\1701 healthy vending\bill3 committee.docx
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
BILL
No. 1-17
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
IIB-82. Annual report.
The Director ofthe Department of General Services must submit
~
report to the
County Council and County Executive
Qy
September 30 each year. The report must
include:
(ill
an assessment of compliance with this Article;
successes, challenges, and barriers experienced in implementation; and
any recommendations for improvement ofthe standards and compliance.
®
W
Approved:
87
Roger Berliner, President, County Council
Date
88
89
Approved:
Isiah Leggett, County Executive
Date
90
91
This is a correct copy ofCouncil action.
Linda M. Lauer, Clerk of the Council
Date
G
f:\law\bills\1701 healthy vending\bill 3 committee.docx
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
LEGISLATIVE REQUEST REPORT
Bill
1-17
Contracts and Procurement
-
Vending Machine Service Contracts-Healthy Vending
Standards
DESCRIPTION:
Bill
1-17
would require certain vending machine service contracts the
County enters into to adhere to certain nutrition standards, and
labeling and product placement requirements
Often, unhealthy snacks are provided in vending machines.
Promote better health by requiring nutritional standards for products
offered in vending machines on county property.
PROBLEM:
GOALS AND
OBJECTIVES:
COORDINATION:
Department of General Services
FISCAL IMPACT:
To be requested
ECONOMIC
IMPACT:
EVALUATION:
EXPERIENCE
ELSEWHERE:
SOURCE OF
INFORMATION:
To be requested
To be researched.
To be researched.
Amanda Mihill, Legislative Attorney,
240-777-7815
N/A
APPLICATION
WITHIN
MUNICIPALITIES:
PENALTIES:
N/A
F:\LAw\BILLS\1701 Healthy Vending\LRR.Docx
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
MONTGOMERY COUNTY COUNCIL
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND
GEORGE LEVENTHAL
COUNCILMEMBER
AT-LARGE
MEMORANDUM
TO:
FROM:
DATE:
SUBJECT:
Montgomery County Councilmembers
George L.
Leventhad~
Chair - Health and Human Services Committee
February 1, 2017
Legislation - - Healthy Vending Machine Standards
On Tuesday, February 7, I will be introducing the attached legislation requiring that certain vending machine
contracts that the County enters into require specific nutritional standards for food and drink: products. This
legislation would require that at least 65 percent of food and beverage items offered for sale in County vending
machines contain no more than 200 calories per package as well as a few other important nutritional aspects.
In 2014 I introduced, and the Council passed, a resolution establishing an ad hoc working group to examine the
quality of foods, snacks and beverages offered in vending machines, cafeterias and eateries in County buildings.
Raising the awareness of County employees about their nutritional choices and providing healthier options is in
line with the recommendations of the ad hoc working group. I am also hopeful that requiring nutritional
standards for products offered in County buildings will promote better health.
If you have any questions or if you would like to co-sponsor this bill, please contact Walton Harris in my office.
STELLA B. WERNER OFFICE BUILDING· 100 MARYLAND AVENUE· ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND
2401777-7811
OR
2401777-7900
TTY
241777-7914
FAX
2401777-7989
WWW.MONTGOMERYCOUNTYMD.GOV/COUNCIL
20850
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND
MEMORANDUM
Febmary 27, 2017
1'0:
Roger Berliner, President. County Council
\
'>,
1
FROl'vl;
Jennifer A. 1I
Alexandre
A.
>!~ctor,
Office of
Management
an~~g~t
Director. Department of
Financ7\t..-r
i
05a,
SUBJECT:
FElS for Bill
1:17,
Contracts and
Procurement - Vending
Machine
Service
Contracts " Healthy Vending Standards
Please
find attached the fiscal and economic impact statements for the above­
referenced legislations.
JA,H:fz
cc: Bonnie Kirkland, Assistant
Chief
Administrative Officer
Lisa Austin,
Offices
of the County
Executive
Joy
Nurmi, Special Assistant to the County Executive
Patrick
Lacefield, Director, Public Infonnation Office
David Platt, Department of Fillance
Dennis Hetman, Department of Finance
Bryan Hunt,
Office
of Management
and
Budget
Naeem Mia, Office of
Management and Budget
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
Fiscal Impact Statement
Bill I - 17, Contracts and Procurement - Vending Machine Service Contract'!!­
Healthy Vending Standards
1,
Legislative Summary.
This bill requires that certain vending machine service contracts
the
County enters into on
or after July 1, 20] 7 adhere to specific nutritional standards for {()Od and drink products.
• All food
or
beverage items offered for sale must be less
than
0,5 grams
oftrans~f~lt
per
serving and no morc than 200 milligrams ofsodium per
package~
and
• Any
beverage offered for sale must be less than 250 calories or 20 fluid ounces,
• Any
vending machine contract entered into on or after
July
1, 2017 must require 50% of
the food and beverage items offered for sale meet the above healthy vending standards.
This increases to
65(%
for contracts entered into on or after
July
1,2018.
2. An estimate of changes in County revenues and expenditures regardless of whether
the revenues or expenditures are assumed in the recommended or approved budget.
Includes source of information, assumptions, and methodologies used.
Our current County Government vending machine contract is a flvc-year contract
effective
4/28/2016
that: adheres to the nutrition requirements under the USDA
Competitive Food Standards;
flllly
complies with the bill; will not experience
any
fiscal
impact from its pa<;sage,
3. Revenue and expenditure estimates covering at least the next 6 fiscal years.
BiH 1 - 17 has no revenue or expenditure impact to the COtmty Government.
4. An actuarial analysis through the entire amortization period for each bill that would
affect retiree pension or group insurance costs.
Not applicable.
5. An estimate of expenditures related to the County's information technology
(IT)
systems, including Enterprise Resource Planning
(ERP)
systems.
Not applicable,
6. Later actions that may affect future revenue and expenditures
if
the bill authorizes
future spending.
Not applicable.
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
7. Au estimate of the staff time needed to implement the bill.
No additional staff time
will
be required to implement the bill
by
the Department of
General Services; the County's vending machine contract administrator.
8.An explanation of how the addition of new staff responsibilities would affect other
dutit'S.
No additional staff
responsibilities would be
added.
9. An estimate of costs when an additional appropriation is needed.
Not applicable.
10. A
description of any variable that eould affect revenue and cost estimates.
Not applicable.
1LRanges
of
revenue or
expenditures
that
arc uncertain or difficult
to project.
Not applicable.
12.
If
a
bill
is
likely
to have no fiscal impact,
why
is that the case?
We
already comply
with
health vending machine standards codified in the legislation.
13. Other fiscal impacts or comments.
The proposed legislation does not apply to the County outside agencies.
14. The following contributed to and concurred with this analysis.
Bryan Hunt and Jedediah Millard, Office of Management and Budget
Angela Dizelos and Rick Taylor, Department of General Services.
V ·
A.
IIuQhes.
Director
-.
Office of Management and Budget
/~nnifer
Date
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
Economic Impact Statement
Bill 1-17. Contracts and Procurement - Vending Machine Service Contrat'ts­
Healthy Vending Standards
Background:
Bill I
~17
\vould require certain vending macbine
servicecOl1traciS
the County enters into to
adhere to certain nutrition standards, and labeling and product placcmenr requirements. Under
Bill 1
*
17, all new vending machine contracts entered into must require:
n
all food or heverage
items oftered for sale be less than 0.5 grams of trans-fat per serving and
nt1
more than 200
milligrams of sodium
per
package; and 2) any bc\'crage
o1Tered1hr
sale be
.less
than 250 calories
or
20 fluid ounces. These nutrition requirements would go into t'ffect
fhr
any vending machine
service contract entered into on or after the date of enactment ofthe legislation.
lnaddition~
the
bill sets forth certain "healthy vending standards". Any vending machine service contract
entered into on or after July
1.
2017 must require at le8...'>t 50% ofthe H)od and beverage items
offered for sale meet the healthy vending standmods. This increases to
65%1
for any vending
machine service contract
entered
into
after July
1, 2018.
1.
The
sources of
information, assumptions, and methodologies
used.
The current
Countygovetilment
vending rilachine contract is a
five-year
contract effective
4/28/2016
that
adheres
to the nutrition requirements under
the USDi\
Competitive Fond
Standards, fully complies with this bill, and
wiII
not experience any fiscal
or
economic
impact from its passage.
2. A description orany variable that could
affect
the cCQnomic impact
cstimatcs~
The Bill does not have an economic impact and the legislation does not
cOilSist of
any
variables that could
atTect
estimates.
3. The Bill's positive or negative effcct,if any on employment,
invcstnumt, incomes, and property values in the County.
spending~ savings~
.
Bill
1-17 would not have an econtJmic effect on employment, savings, investment, income,
or property values in the County. Thcintent of tIle Bill is
(0
pronwte better health
by
requiring nutritional standards for products
oftered
in vending machiries solely on County
property.
4.
If
a
nUl
is
likely
to bave no economic impact,
wh~'
is that the case?
See #3.
5. The following contributed to or concurred with this analysis:
David
Platt, Dennis
Hetman, and
Robett Hagt..-doom. Finance,
---'~'--.
Alexandre
A.
Espinosa. Director
Department of Finance
Page 1 of 1
1. /
t].'i
'U>/7
Date
I
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
IFB #1061173
EQUIPMENT
The Contractor must provide new or like new, vending equipment to all locations. The Contractor shall provide the vending
machines at no cost to the County. All vending machines shall be energy efficient and with remote monitoring features when
possible. Machines shall be able to accept a combination of coins or dollar bills and in some cases credit/debit cards. All machines
shall be the property of the Contractor. All machines must be removed upon expiration/termination/cancellation of the contract.
The list of County locations can be found in Attachment F of this Solicitation.
HEALTHY VENDING PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS
The County will promote healthier vending which governs the types of beverages and food that can be sold on the County property.
In providing vending products and services under this agreement, the Contractor shall comply with the terms of the nutrition
standards and shall offer for sale only such products that conform to the requirements set forth below. Examples of foods and
beverages that comply with these guidelines are available at the end of this section (Appendix - Approved Products for Machines).
Require 50% of all the items in snack machines meet the USDA Competitive Food Standards as outlined above. The percentage of
snack products that meet the following:
1. Per the USDA Competitive Food Standards, 50% of individual SNACK products stocked in all machines must have:
A. No more than 200 calories per package
B. No more than 35
%
of calories from total fat per package
1. Nuts, seeds, nut/seed butters, and reduced fat cheese are exempt from the total fat standard sweeteners or fats
are exempt from the total fat standard
2. products consisting of only dried fruit with nuts and/or seeds with no added nutritive sweeteners or fats are
exempt from the total fat standard (nuts and/or seeds roasted in oils are not exempt)
3. Combination products are not exempt and must meet all the nutrient standards
C.
No more than 10% of calories from saturated fat per package
1. Reduced fat cheese (including part-skim Mozzarella.) is from the saturated fat standard
2. Nuts and seeds and nut/seed butters are exempt from the saturated fat standard
3. Products consisting of only dried fruit with nuts and/or seeds with no added nutritive sweeteners or fats are
exempt from the saturated fat standard (nuts and/or seeds roasted in oils are not exempt)
4. Combination products are not exempt and must meet all the nutrient standards
D. Zero grams of trans fat per item (:;0.5 gram per portion)
E. No more than 35% total weight of item (per package) from sugar and caloric sweeteners
1.
Dried whole fruits or vegetable, dried whole fruit or vegetable. pieces, and dehydrated fruits or vegetables with no
added nutritive sweeteners are exempt from the sugar standard
2. products consisting of only exempt dried fruit with nuts, and lor seeds with no added nutritive. sweeteners or fats
are exempt from the sugar standard (nuts and/or seeds roasted in oils are riot exempt)
F. No more than 200 mg sodium per item (prepackage)
G. For grain products, items must contain at least 50% whole grains by weight or have whole grains as the first ingredient.
H. For non-grain products the first ingredient must be one of the main food groups: fruits, vegetables, dairy, or proteins
(meat, beans, poultry, seafood, eggs, nuts, seeds, etc.) or be a combination food that contains at least
%
C\AP of fruits
and/or vegetables
I.
Sugar free chewing gum is exempt
2. In addition to meeting the USDA Competitive Food Standards, the following conditions apply to snacks:
A. ReqUire at least 3 slots of dried whole fr\Aits or vegetables, dried whole fruit or vegetable pieces, and dehydrated fruits
or vegetables with no added nutritive sweeteners
B. Require at least
~
slots of nuts and/or seeds with no added nutritive sweeteners or fats
C.
Preference will be given to products with
~
grams or more of fiber per serving
3. The following beverage products may be stocked in machines:
A. Plain water or plain carbonated water (no size limit)
B, Low fat (1%) milk and/or nutritionally equivalent milk alternative (soy/rice), unflavored
C. Non-fat milk and/or nutritionally equivalent milk alternatives (soy, rice), flavored or unflavored
D. 100% fruit/vegetable juice
14
@
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
IFB #1061173
E. 100% fruit/vegetable juice diluted with water (with·or without carbonation), with no added sweeteners
F. Diet teas, diet soda, and other low calorie beverages (less than 40 calories per 8 fluid ounces)
4. In addition to meeting the USDA Competitive Food Standards, the following conditions apply to beverages:
A. Requires at least 2 slots/buttons Water
1.
Water should be calorie-free with no added color, flavor, or sweetener of any kind
2. If drinking water is readily available in the vicinity of the vending machine, unflavored seltzer or flavored seltzer
that use natural flavors with no added nutritive sweeteners or artificial sweeteners water may be substituted for
the 2 slots of water
B. Require a maximum of 5 slots/ buttons to stock high calorie beverages (more than 40 calories per 8 fluid ounces), such
as sodas and 100% juice beverages. The 5 slot limit applies no matter how many slots are in the machine. High calorie
beverages are required to be no more than 20 fluid ounces
C.
Require water and seltzer be place at eye level, or in the highest selling position and that high calorie beverages should
be placed farthest from eye level, or in the lowest selling position
D. Require calorie information is posted for each beverage, as packaged
LOST, STOLEN OR DAMAGED EQUIPMENT
Lost, stolen or damaged equipment shall be replaced or repaired (as applicable) at no cost to the County.
PRICING
Items are to be priced competitively. No approval from the County is required for price changes, provided that the product price is
below $3.00.
REFUNDS
The Contractor shall be responsible for the refunds. The Contractor shall attach its refund policy to all machines and provide contact
information and instructions on how to obtain refunds for the customers.
SCHEDULE OF SERVICE
The Contractor
will
service (replenish) all machines on a regularly scheduled basis. It should not be necessary for any departmentto
can the Contractor and inquire as to why machines have not been serviced. Machines are to be stocked on average 1-2 times per
week. The contractor will proVide to the County, before the machines are placed at the County locations, a schedule as to when the
machines will be serviced/replenished. Machines are to be replenished on average 1-2 times per week during business hours (8a.m.
- 4p.m., EST) depending on the machine. The Contractor will provide a name, phone number,_ and email address of a contact person
who the County can call regarding concerns with the machines. This person will not bethe person who provides the weekly service
to the machines. Phone calls and e-mails to this contact person must be responded to within 24 hours of the County's call. A
monthly meeting with this contact person will be schedule at the convenience of the County. Once the County has determined that
service delivery is meeting expectations, these meetings will be quarterly.
SERVICE CALLS
The County expects prompt service from the Contractor in response to equipment that needs repair or has broken. Service calls
shall be addressed within forty-eight (48) hours from the County notification to Contractor. If equipment repairs cannot be made
on-site and downtime is determined by the County to be excess.ive, the CORtractor maybe required to replace the equipment with a
loaner until such time as repairs can be completed or the Contractor provides a permanent replacement. Ifthe Contractor cannot
comply within 48 hours, the Contractor must notify the County by email or phone with an alternate plan or arrangement.
SUPPLY OR MERCHANDISE
The Contractor agrees to provide and maintain an adequate supply of merchandise for dispensing in the equipment provided. The
Contractor shall be responsible to provide an adequate routing schedu Ie to ensure that merchandise is continuously available and
equipment is properly functioning that meets or is better than the County's schedule (e.g., high traffic areas, etc.). Contractorshall,
at a minimum, adhere to the schedule as outlined in this solicitation.
SUSTAINABllITY
It is recommended that the contractor give preference to products in recyclable or compostable packaging and offer some organic,
local, Oi' documented sustainably grown products, It is also suggested that they label products that are
org~nic,
local, or
documented sustainably grown products, use Energy Star certified machines,and use energy conservation methods such as LED
lighting and occupancy sensors that can be added to existing machines (refrigerated and non-refrigerated).
15
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
l
AM ER I CAN
BEVERAGE
A.
S SOC I
l\
"
I
c.~
N
Think Balance Campaign
The "Think Balance" Campaign is a nationwide television and digital campaign designed to talk to moms about how
America's beverage companies are working to reduce sugar consumed from beverages in support of her efforts to
achieve balance for her family.
Beverage companies are supporting mom in her effort to reduce her families sugar
consumption from beverages:
We are providing new beverage options, information and encouragementto choose a
WHAT YOU
beverage to help reduce your sugar consumption.
o Soft drinks in a range of calories, sparkling teas and waters, sports drinks,
ready-to-drinkteas, bottled water, flavored and enhanced waters, juice and
juice drinks - are just some of the options that can support her efforts.
Through a national calorie awareness program our signs are reminders to consider
their choices and think "balance" before choosing a beverage that best fits your day.
We are placing clear calorie information on every can, bottle and pack we produce so
that consumers have the information they need right at their fingertips.
As part of the industry's broader Balance Calories Initiative - a partnership between The Coca-Cola Company, Dr
Pepper Snapp Ie Group and PepsiCo with the Alliance for a Healthier Generation - they are working to reduce
calories and sugar from beverages in theAmerican dietby 20% by 2025.
'
.BALANCE
DRINK
&00
EAT
Talking to mom about sugar.
• Mom is the primary shopper and influencer in her
household and she is striving every day to help her family
achieve balance, and reduce their sugar consumption,
incl uding her own.
• She welcomes and is responsive to the collective
voluntary actions by competitive beverage companies and
their engagement in support of her and her family.
The elements of the campaign:
• "Think Balance" is a nationwide television and digital advertising campaign that will run from November 2016
through the remainder of the year.
• Television ads will run on programming predominately watched bymoms- including Bravo, Hallmark, HLN,
Cooking Chanel, HGTV, CNN, Food Network, Lifetime, MSNBC, TNT, USA, TruTV, TV Land, VH1
• Digital ads will be seen where moms interact online - including Facebook, Instagram, Spotify, Undertone,
Youtube, Google and Yahoo.
To learn more about our efforts to reduce sugar from beverages, visit BalanceUS.org,and watch the full "Think Balance"
ad on DeliveringChoices.org or at https://vimeo.comI190306071.
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
AMERICAN
BEVERAGE
"5 S Oc: I ,,'°10 N
'
Industry Leadership
It's not always easy to find balance. That's why America' beverage companies - Coca Cola, Dr Pepper and Pepsi­
are spearheading multiple initiatives that help reduce the beverage calories from sugar in the American diet
Whether it's providing more choices with less sugar in stores and removing full-calorie soft drinks from schools,
we're always looking for different ways to support your efforts to make balanced choices.
Balance Calories Initiative
America's beverage companies have made a long-term commitment to reduce the sugar
from beverages in the American diet Working with the Alliance for a Healthier
Generation, we set a bold goal to reduce beverage calories consumed per person
nationally by 20 percent by 2025. We are workingto reach this goal by driving
consumer behavior change toward reduced calorie beverage choices and encouraging
calorie awareness and balance at the pOint-of-purchase. And weare enhancing oUf
efforts in five test and learn communities - East Los Angeles, Little Rock, Montgomery,
the Mississippi Delta and New York City - where access to reduced calorie options has
lagged and obesity rates are above the national average.
BALANCE
WHAT YOU
EAT,
DRINK
&DO
ThinkBalance is a nationwide television and digital campaign designed to talk to moms about how
America's beverage companies are working to reduce sugar in beverages in support ofher effortsto
achieve balance for her family
Clear on Calories Initiative and CaloriesCountBeverage Vending Program
The Clear on Calories Initiative was launched in 2010 to support First Lady
Michelle Obama's "Let's Move!" anti-obesity campaign. We added easy to read
calorie labels to the front of every can, bottle and pack we produce. The labels
display the total calories per container on beverages 20 ounces or smaller and
for containers larger than 20 ounces, calories are labeled per 12 ounces in most
cases. In 2012, we launched Calories Count on vending machines, providing
reminders that Calories Count and to "Check then Choose" right on the point-of­
sale to make it easy to consider the calories in your beverage choices and
choose the beverage that's right for you.
90
tllD"'[S
r(ACI'
12flOZ
1355ml)
School Beverage Guidelines
By working with the Alliance for a Healthier Generation, we removed full­
calorie sodas from schools through our voluntary National School
Beverage Guidelines. We replaced full-calorie sodas with waters, portion­
controlled sports drinks, low- and no-calorie beverages and 100 percent
juices. And none of our drinks sold in schools exceed 150 calories for
every 8 ounces.
As
a result, we have cut beverage calories shipped to
schools by 90 percent since 2004.
To learn more about our leadership initiatives, visit DeliveringChoices.org.
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
THE BEVERAGE INDUSTRY:
We're Delivering
in Maryland
The beverage industry is a major
contributor to Maryland's economy,
manufacturing and distributing some of
the most popular non -alcoholic beverages
in the world. From products in your
neighborhood stores to our sUpport of
local community initiatives, our presence
is felt in every community across the state.
We play an important role in the state's
economy by providing well-paying jobs,
paying significant tax dollars to the state
and federal government, and making
generous charitable contributions to
organizations across the state.
ASSOCIATION
MD-DE-D.C.
BEVERAGE
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
COMMITMENT TO ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY
Maryland's soft drink companies have a longstanding commitment to a cleaner environment, constantly working to improve
and develop ways to lessen the environmental impact of manufacturing and delivering our products into Y9ur communities.
Our environmental initiatives are many and varied and include:
Ensuring that our beverage
c~ntainers
are
100%
recyclable and one of the most recycled packaging in
curbside recycling programs.
Saving energy usage through high efficiency refrigeration technology.
Cutting down on energy and materials usage by making our product packaging lighter and reusing our
transportation packaging.
Minimizing energy usage and fleet emissions by relying on highly efficient, centralized production and
distribution systems for our products.
Making it easier for people to recycle by relying on packaging materials that are recoverable in most recycling
programs around the country.
Reducing the usage of water by incorporating state of the art wastewater treatment and the reuse of processed
. water from manufacturing and distribution facilities.
Supporting recycling
eff~rts
through our long-standing use of recycled content in aluminum, glass, and PET
plastic beverage containers.
Environmental stewardship is a critical part of our operating philosophy. Beverage producers have always been environmental
leaders, and we will continue to innovate and undertake the very best environmental practices to be good to our planet.
COMMITMENT TO HEALTH AND WELLNESS:
CLEAR ON CALORIES-CALORIE INFORMATION
AT YOUR
FINGERTIPS
Maryland's beverage companies are putting new labels on the front of every can, bottle, and pack we produce-making it easier to
choose the drink that's right for you. This is all part of our Clear on Calories initiative, announced in February
2010
in support
of First Lady Michelle Obama's "Let's Move!" anti-obesity campaign.
Consumers across America are seeing these labels arrive on the front of their favorite beverages, as Clear on Calories arrives
in stores. This is yet another way that the beverage industry is helping consumers make informed choices as part of an active,
healthy lifestyle.
SCHOOL BEVERAGE GUIDELINES
We promised America's parents that we would change the beverage mix in schools, and our companies-along with their
school partners-have delivered dramatic and significant results. With the national School Beverage Guidelines, we removed
full-calorie sodas from schools and replaced them with a range of lower-calorie , smaller-portion choices. This has been no
easy feat, but it is one we are proud of, and we know will have meaningful and lasting results.
Full-calorie soft drinks have been re:rnoved. Shipments of full-calorie soft drinks to schools have declined
by
97%
between
2004,
the last comprehensive data available prior to the agreement, and the end of the
2009-2010
school year.
Calories available from beverages in schools have been cut dra:rnatically. In fact,
90%
fewer beverage calories
were shipped to schools during that time.
We have successfully changed the beverage landscape in schools across the country. The School Beverage
Guidelines provide for a range oflower-calorie, smaller-portion beverage options.
As
a result, the beverage
mix in schools
continu~s
to shift to waters, portion-controlled sports drinks, diet drinks, and
100%
juices.
The School Beverage Guidelines are common sense, supported by science, and responsive to concerns about nutrition
in schools.
tY
MDoDEonG
ASSOCIATION
BEVERAGE
3 CHURCH CIRCLE
#201,
ANNAPOLIS, MD
21401
PHONE:
(410) 990-9502
FAX:
(410) 990-9503
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
miNetwork-
~
....
~cancerAction
February 28, 2017
American Cancer Society
Cancel' Action Network
7500 Greenway Center Dr. Suite 300
Greenbelt, MD 20770
301.758.1255
www.acscan.org
TO:
FROM:
RE:
President Berliner
Montgomery County Council Members
Bonita Pennino, MS Government Relations Director
Support for
Bill 1-17:
Vending Machine Service Contracts, Healthy Vending Standards
Position:
The American Cancer Society supports improving access to healthy foods and beverages, including healthy
choices in vending machines.
Background:
Approximately one fifth of all cancer cases expected to occur in the US this year can be attributed to poor
nutrition, physical inactivity, and excess weight. Overweight and obesity are clearly associated with an
increased risk of developing cancers ofthe breast in postmenopausal women, colon and rectum, endometrium,
kidney, esophagus, pancreas, ovary, liver, stomach, gallbladder, and prostate. Overweight and obesity may also
be associated with an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and cancer of the cervix.
As a result ofthe clear relationship diet, physical inactivity, and body weight have with many types of cancer,
the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network supports multi-faceted, population-based policy
approaches to improving nutrition and physical activity by removing barriers to healthy lifestyles, changing
social norms, and increasing education and awareness of healthy choices. One key strategy for obesity
prevention is improving access to healthy foods and beverages, including healthy choices in vending machines.
Often, there is a lack of healthy options when eating away from home, particularly among selections in vending
machines. Applying nutrition standards for foods and beverages in vending machines can improve access to
healthier selections. Nutrition standards for foods and beverages found in vending machines in government
owned and rented facilities can positively impact the eating habits of people working for and visiting
government agencies, help shape social norms, and influence the practices and formulations of food companies.
Through healthy vending policies, public agencies can provide healthy food and beverage options to many
individuals, including employees and visitors to government parks and service agencies.
Government agencies can be a model for healthy eating, reinforce other agency-sponsored, obesity-prevention
efforts, and show that healthy food tastes good and can generate revenue. More and more people are interested
in healthier snack options. According to a 2010 study by the Snack Food Association, about 74% of consumers
are trying to eat healthier, with about 65% eating specific foods to lose weight. Sales of healthier snacks are
outpacing traditional snack foods 3 to 1.
Nutrition standards ensure that foods and beverages sold in vending machines in government locations align
with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the U.S. government's nutrition guidance for the nation. Offering
foods and beverages that meet nutrition standards in vending machines located on government property is a
promising, low-cost approach for supporting healthy eating and as part of a strategy to address obesity.
It
also
@
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
could decrease the economic burden of obesity, which costs $150 billion a year - half of which is paid by
taxpayers through Medicaid and Medicare.
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
~I
Montgomery County Council
Bill 1-17
Testimony in Support of Healthy Vending Options
Members of Montgomery County Council:
My name is Barbara Weckstein Kaplowitz and I am a resident of Potomac, MD and a volunteer
with the American Diabetes Association.
On behalf of the more than 620,000 Marylanders with diabetes, as well as the additional 1.6
million with prediabetes, the American Diabetes Association urges the Montgomery County
Council to pass Bill 1-17. This legislation seeks to adopt certain nutrition, labeling, and product
placement standards for foods and beverages offered in vending machines on county
property.
Primary prevention of type 2 diabetes for individuals with prediabetes and in the general
population, including efforts to reduce obesity and improve nutrition and physical activity, is a
legislative priority of the American Diabetes Association. According to the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention (CDC), being overweight is a leading modifiable risk factor for diabetes,
and nearly 80 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight. Eating a healthy diet is
essential to curbing obesity and avoiding type 2 diabetes and managing type 1 diabetes and its
many complications in both children and adults.
According to the Association's
Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes
-
2017,
people with
diabetes and those at risk should avoid sugar-sweetened beverages in order to control weight
and reduce their risk for cardiovascular disease and should minimize the consumption of foods
with added sugar that have the capacity to displace healthier, more nutrient-dense food
1
choices.
The American Diabetes Association is also a part of the National Alliance for Nutrition and
Activity (NANA) and participated in the development of their "Model Beverage and Food
Vending Machine Standards" which were created to provide a model for municipal, state, and
federal government leased or operated vending machines or vending machines on public
2
property to support the health of their employees or visitors.
Since Bill 1-17 helps ensure the availability of healthy foods in vending machines on county
property, aligns with the Association's prevention efforts, and generally follows the NANA
nutrition standards, the American Diabetes Association supports the legislation and urges the
Montgomery County Council to pass it.
http://professional.diabetes.org!sitesiprofessional.diabetes
.org/filesimedia/dc
40 s 1 final.pdf
2
http://www. dia be tes.
orgl
assets/pdfsl communi tv! s top-d -at -worklnana -model-vending -standards. pdf
I
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
American
American
Association
Heart
Association ..
Stroke
fife is why-
Testimony of the American Heart Association
Stuart Berlow, Director of Government Relations
Bill 1-17: Vending Machine Service Contracts, Healthy Vending Standards
Montgomery County Council
February 28, 2017
President Berliner and members of the Council, the American Heart Association strongly
supports this measure and appreciates the opportunity to present our position. AHA
commends the Council for considering this legislation, which will make the healthy
choice the easy choice. Once approved, all County residents, visitors, and more than
40,000 employees will more easily be able to choose healthy food and beverage options
at Montgomery County facilities.
As you know, the Country wisely adopted healthy vending standards through its vending
service contract in 2016. To ensure the permanence of this sound policy, AHA
recommends swift passage of this legislation, without amendment. This is particularly
important since a recent survey indicates that 61
%
of machines on County property stock
mostly unhealthy food and beverage options.
Implementation of healthy vending is especially important given the burden of chronic
disease and escalating health care costs in the County. According to 2014 Behavioral
Risk Factor Surveillance System data and Healthy Montgomery, currently in
Montgomery County:
• Heart disease is the leading cause of death, with more than 1,700 deaths each year
• 29% of adults are obese, and 57% are overweight or obese
• 77% of Hispanics in Montgomery County are overweight or obese, as are 68% of
African-Americans and 56% of Whites
• 20% ofteenagers in the County are overweight or obese
• 28% of adult residents have high blood pressure
• Only 30% of adults consume the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables
• Only 53% of residents get 150 minutes of moderate physical activity each week
• 17% of teenagers do not engage in any regular physical activity
• Over 175,000 county residents were enrolled in Medicaid in 2014
Despite this Council's strong commitment to the health of county residents, these
statistics tell us that much more must be done to combat unhealthy weight and to help
employees, residents, and visitors make healthy nutrition choices, and to reduce the
County's rising health care costs attributed to chronic disease and unhealthy lifestyles.
"Building
f/&1fthier 1f1e5,
free of c8lfJiovBscuiar
diseasE's
ar!L'1
stroke,
"
life is
why'~
es per la
vida'"
~~~$'"
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
Healthy vending can help accomplish this. The legislation before you would ensure that
50% of food and beverages in vending machines on county property meet certain national
nutrition standards. This is about providing options; those choosing to consume less
healthy food and drinks still can do so.
Implementation of this policy would help all residents and employees achieve a healthier
diet by making more nutritious choices while visiting County property. The American
Heart Association recommends:
• Consuming less than 1,500 mg of sodium/day
• Limiting intake of added sugar to 6 teaspoons/women and 9 teaspoons/men. For
example, one 12-ounce can of soda contains 8 teaspoons, for about 130 calories.
• Limiting the amount of trans fats to less than 1 percent of your total daily calories
• Eating between 25 and 35 percent of your total daily calories as fats from foods
like fish, nuts, and vegetable oils.
• Selecting fat-free (skim) and low-fat
(I
%) dairy products
Aside from the health benefits, jurisdictions that have implemented healthy vending have
seen increased profits for vendors and increased sales in machines. Research from the
Snack Food Association tells us that:
• 74% of consumers are trying to eat healthier
• 65% of consumers are eating specific, healthier foods to lose weight
• Sales of healthier snacks are outpacing traditional snack foods by 4 to 1
• Sales of healthier foods are increasingly contributing to increased sales growth
and profits for food companies
As a result, jurisdictions throughout the country have adopted vending policies to
facilitate healthy decision-making. Peer communities including Baltimore City,
Washington DC, Mecklenburg County (Charlotte) NC, and Columbia, SC have already
enacted healthy vending. This trend of supporting healthy eating in public places is
rapidly spreading throughout the country, and adoption would position Montgomery once
again at the forefront of national leadership in the promotion of health and wellbeing for
residents, visitors, and employees.
The American Heart Association strongly supports this measure and is committed to
working with the Council and relevant agencies to implement this policy.
Thank you for your consideration and for continuing to foster heart health and wellbeing
in Montgomery County. Should you have any questions, please contact me at
stuart.berlow@heaIt.org or 703-248-1722.
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
~
\(\
Y/ .
".
Science
TN
TRE
Public
Interest
The
nonproiit
pub1W1er
(!f
N..aririIm Af:lian
Hralth!r:Ha
CENTER FOR
February 28,2017
The Honorable Roger Berliner
Council President
Montgomery County Council
100 Maryland A venue
Rockville, MD 20850
Re: Bill 1-17, An act to require certain vending machine service contracts the
County enters into to adhere to certain nutrition standards, and labeling and
product placement requirements; and generally amend County procurement law.
Dear Council President Berliner and Council Members:
Thank you for the opportunity to provide comments. The Center for Science in the Public
Interest (CSPI) strongly supports Council Bill 1-17, which expands access to healthier food and
beverages options on Montgomery County property.
CSPI is a nonprofit organization supported by our 550,000 members, including more than 800 in
Montgomery County. Since 1971, we have advocated for nutrition and food safety policies to
make it easier for people to eat healthfully so they can avoid heart disease, high blood pressure,
cancer, diabetes, and other diet- and obesity-related diseases.
This commonsense, public health measure would improve the nutritional quality of foods and
beverages in County-owned and operated vending machines and would support the efforts of
Montgomery County residents and employees to choose healthier products, reducing their risk of
heart disease, diabetes, and other nutrition and obesity-related diseases.
A national study found that only 5 percent of vended foods on state or local property are healthy
options. Candy, chips, and sweet baked goods make up more than 80 percent of the products
available in food and vending machines on public property. But consumers want healthier foods.
According to a survey by the Snack Food Association, three-quarters of people are trying to eat
healthier. States and localities are responding by adopting nutrition standards for the foods and
beverages on their public property and/or through their programs. To date, more than 100
jurisdictions have chosen to offer healthier foods and beverages on public property, and many
more are in the process of adopting similar policies.
In addition to CSPI, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Institute of Medicine,
the Bipartisan Policy Center, the National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity, the American
Heart Association, and others have listed nutrition guidelines for public places and community
1210 L Street, N\\: Suiic }OO • WashlllglOll DC
20tiOS-4v5) •
tel
202
.332-9110 •
fax
202
265 4954 •
\\>"\\~,\.':cspineL(!Tg
@
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
Page 2
institutions as a priority strategy for reducing obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and other diet­
related chronic diseases.
Please let me know if I can provide any additional information.
Sincerely,
Margo G. Wootan, DSc
Director, Nutrition Policy
Angela Amico, MPH
Policy Associate
1220 L Street, NW, Suite
.300 •
WmJllngwn
DC
20DO)-w5) •
tt!
202 332-9110 • fax 202 2654954 •
,v·ww.cspinCLOl"g
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
GREATER
CHAMBER
OF
COMMERCE
SILVER
SPRING
February 27, 2017
Council President Roger Berliner
and Members of the Council
Montgomery County Council
100 Maryland Avenue
Rockville, Maryland 20854
RE: Bill 1-1 7 - Contracts and Procurement - Vending Machine Service Contracts - Healthy Vending Standards
Dear Council President Berliner and Members of the Council:
On behalf of the Greater Silver Spring Chamber of Commerce, I am submitting this letter in lieu of testimony to
express the concerns of some of our members about Bill 1-17. Among our Chamber's members is at least one
company that owns and operates vending machines in private venues in Montgomery County. Unfortunately,
neither this business-owner nor I can be at the public hearing. He received notice on Friday of an equipment
delivery tomorrow; and I have business in Annapolis at the time of the hearing.
While our member is very open to and supportive of healthy vending, he has expressed concern that the
constraints of Bill 1-17 would completely discourage him and other competent companies from doing business
with the County.
He offers the following for your consideration. A pair of vending machines (one for snacks and one for
beverages) can easily cost a company around $12,000. You need to sell a lot of snacks and beverages before you
begin to break-even, let alone make a profit. The assumption that people will buy more healthy items if they are
offered, is not based on the reality of consumer habits. He can cite several healthy-only vending companies that
have not made it. In fact, he got into the business focusing primarily on healthy vending and quickly realized
that he would not be able to recoup his return on investment ifhe could sell only healthy snacks and beverages.
In his current business model, he includes many healthy snacks and beverages, based on customer demand.
However, he recognized that he could not cover his machine and operating costs ifhe did not offer a good
selection of traditional snacks and beverages as well.
If Montgomery County implements this law, he and likely many other professional and sustainable vending
companies will not even consider bidding on a County vending contract. Under the restrictions in this bill, they
simply would not risk the capital investment to do business with County.
Encouraging County employees, and visitors to County facilities, to eat healthier diets is a laudable endeavor.
However, it seems that the stipulations in this bill go too far. Perhaps an incentive for either vending machine
companies or consumers to make healthier selections would be a smaller, but effective step in the right
direction.
Thank you for your consideration of these concerns .
~
. .. Smcerely••.•..
President
~
8601 Georgia Avenue, Suite 203, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910
Phone: 301-565-3777
Fax: 301-565-3377
info @gsscc.org
www.gsscc.org
@
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
MONTGOMERY COUNfY
FOOD COUNCIL
February 24,2017
2017 SESSION POSITION PAPER
BILL:
Vending Standards
POSITION:
BILL ANALYSIS:
Letter of Support
Bill 1-17 requires certain vending machine service contracts the County enters into to
1-17, Contracts and Procurement - Vending Machine Service Contracts - Healthy
adhere to certain nutritional standards, and labeling and product placement requirements. Under Bill 1-17,
all new vending machine contracts entered into must require (a) all food or beverage items offered for sale
be less than 0.5 grams of trans-fat per serving and no more than 200 milligrams of sodium per package; and
(b) any beverage offered for sale be less than 250 calories or 20 fluid ounces.
The Montgomery County Food Council urges you to SUPPORT this bill as it allows for the continuation and
expansion of existing County procurement policies that increase the availability of healthy food options in
vending machines. For the past three years, Montgomery County has ranked the healthiest county in
Maryland according to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's County Health and Roadmap Rankings, due in
part to Montgomery County's progressive health and wellbeing policies, including indoor and public smoking
and e-cigarette restrictions, restaurant menu labeling, and county procurement regulations that require
healthy vending machine options on County property. Selling high-calorie, low nutritional-value foods in
vending machines on County property without simultaneously providing healthier choices sends the wrong
message to our community. Providing healthier vending options in machines on County property has the
potential to lower the incidence of food-related chronic illnesses, such as obesity, heart disease, and some
forms of cancer, when combined with a healthier diet at home.
The Montgomery County Food Council is an independent council formed and led by individual community
members and representatives of local businesses, government, non-profit organizations, and educational
institutions that broadly represent the food system both substantively and geographically. Our mission is to
bring together a diverse representation of stakeholders in a public and private partnership to improve the
environmental, economic, social and nutritional health of Montgomery County, Maryland through the
creation of a robust, local, sustainable food system. Our vision is to cultivate a vibrant food system in
Montgomery County that consciously produces, distributes, and recycles food, making it accessible to all
residents while promoting the health of the local food economy, its consumers, and the environment.
4825 Cordell Avenue, Suite 204
mocofoodcouncil.org
I
I
Bethesda, MD 20814
I
806.395.5593
info@mocofoodcouncil.org
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
For these reasons, The Montgomery County Food Council supports Bill 1-17 and urges you to vote FOR this
bill. For more information, please contact Heather Bruskin, MCFC Executive Director, at 806-395-5593 or
hbruskin@mocofoodcouncil.org.
4825 Cordell Avenue, Suite 204
mocofoodcouncil.org
I
Bethesda, MD 20814
I
806.395.5593
info@mocofoodcouncil.org
@
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
TO:
Roger Berliner, President Montgomery County Council
Members, Montgomery County Council
l
FROM:
DATE:
Montgomery County Medical Society
February 28, 2017
SUPPORT ­ Bill 1-17 ­ Healthy Vending Standards
RE:
On behalf of more than 1,500 Montgomery County Medical Society physicians, Mr. Presi.dent alld
members of
the
County Council, thank you tor the opportunity to offer my
strong support
for Montgom.ery
County Bin 1-17, Healthy Vending Standards.
improving our food environment
is a
crucial component of obesity prevention. The Healthy Vending
Standards
Bill
is an effective, incremental approach to reducing
the
burden of poor nutrition
and
obesity
i,n
Montgomery County.
• More
than
half of
all
adults
in
Montgomery Cowlty are
overweight
or obese.
i
• Almost one in four children in Montgomery County are ovenvcight or obesc.
ii
This
rate outpaces
the national average.
iii
• Risk faclors
in
Montgomery Counry are disproportionately concentrated in minority communities,
communities of color, women, and low-income households.
iv
The Institute of Medicine provides evidence-based
recommendations for local government action
to
prevent obesity, especially among children. One such recommendation is to increase healthy food and beverage
options in worksites, recreation centers, and other public venues.
v
• Increasing healthy options in public vending machines can improve dietary behavior and body
mass index
(BMI).vi,vii
On behalf of the Montgomery County Medical Society, a chartered component of MedChi, The Maryland
State Medical Society, I offer my
strong support
for Bill
J
-17
as
an effective way to protect the health
of
all
those who
live,
work,
and
play
in
Montgomery
County.
',.
"
i
,I::
@
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
To: President and Members, Montgomery County Council
From: NAACP State Chapter
Date: February 28, 2017
Subject: SUPPORT - Bill 1-17 Healthy Vending Standards
One of the NAACP State Chapter mission's is to significantly improve food security and community well­
being of all who live, work, study, worship and play in Montgomery County.
As representatives and
advocates for the community, particularly those most vulnerable, we are concerned
about the impact of unhealthy food environments on the health of Latinos and African
Americans. Our research shows that these groups are disproportionately targeted by
major corporations through predatory marketing and sales that are damaging.
But due to the disproportionate burden of obesity and other chronic diseases in our
community, we fight an uphill battle. More than half of Montgomery County's residents
suffer from cardiovascular disease, and minorities are impacted at much higher rates.
Additionally, the lack of healthy options available to our children has placed them at
great risk for serious consequences; half (50%) of Latino children born after 2000 are
projected to develop Type 2 diabetes.
1
This epidemic could mean that our children are
the first generation to not live as long as their parents. The massive burden of chronic
disease will place great strain on families, communities, hospitals, and budgets, in
addition to decreasing the productivity and potential for these children as they grow up.
Everyone should have healthier options for food and drinks. Studies show that three­
quarters of people are trying to eat healthier
2,
but lack of healthy options in vending
machines could impair their ability to do so.
Montgomery County Bill 1-17 will allow for those most marginalized to have the
opportunity to choose healthier options that can benefit them. These options can help
reverse the rising rates of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. By making
healthier food and drinks more widely available in vending machines located on county
property like parks, recreation centers and libraries this bill will help make the healthy
choice the easy choice for children and their families.
All families regardless of social or economic circumstances should be afforded the same
opportunities to help improve health. That is why we, the NAACP state chapter, support
this bill.
We hope that you will vote in favor of Montgomery County Bill 1-17.
1.
CDC, 2011
2. Snack Food Association, 2010
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
TO:
Roger Berliner, President, Montgomery County Council
Members, Montgomery County Council
FROM: R. Lindsey Parsons, Executive Director, Real Food for Kids - Montgomery
DATE: February 28, 2017
RE:
SUPPORT - Bill 1-17 - Healthy Vending Standards
Mr. President and members of the County Council, thank you for the opportunity to offer my
support for Montgomery County Bill 1-17, Healthy Vending Standards and thank you council
members who are already co-sponsors of this bill.
Real Food for Kids - Montgomery is a grassroots parent and student organization with more
than 4400 supporters in the county. While our primary mission is healthier school food, we are
also strong supporters of improving the snack environment outside of schools, in the places like
libraries where many kids go after school and in county buildings, where parents come to
conduct business, with kids in tow. We support this legislation because it will make it easier for
our kids to make healthy choices when approaching vending machines on their own, make it
easier for us to get our younger kids a healthy snack when out and about, as well as offer us
adults some healthy options, which are sadly lacking in most vending machines.
Eating a nutritious, balanced diet is essential for good health and well-being at every stage of
life, but is especially important for children and adolescents. Vending machines that are
ubiquitous and are filled with calorie-dense, nutrient-poor junk food only contribute to the
growing childhood obesity problem in our country. The CDC's Youth Behavior Risk Survey from
2015 showed that 21% of high school students in MCPS were overweight or obese, which was
a 1% rise from the previous survey in 2013. The health risks for obese children and teens are
no less serious than they are for adults, which include heart disease, type 2 diabetes, high blood
pressure, and social stigma.
The financial consequences of not addressing the epidemic of childhood obesity and type II
diabetes are huge. Since 1980, obesity prevalence among children and adolescents has almost
tripled. The cost of health care for obese adults is 42% more than adults at a healthy weight.
2000 or later will suffer from diabetes at some point in their lives. 10.1% of Maryland adults
already have diabetes. People with diagnosed diabetes, on average, have medical expenditures
approximately 2.3 times higher than those without diabetes, 62.4% of which falls to
government programs to pay.
iii
While it is hard to envision anyone objecting to a bill that simply asks that companies offer
healthier choices along with unhealthy choices (except the companies that sell those unhealthy
ii
i
According to the CDC, if the trend in childhood obesity continues, one in three children born in
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
products), one concern you may hear is that this might affect the vending revenues. This
concern is most likely unfounded, as a program of 100% healthier vending machines in Chicago
Parks, which serve almost 200,000 children annually through after-school and summer
programs, showed an average monthly per-machine sales increase of between $84 and $371
with 100% of staff and 88% of patrons reacting positively to the initiative.
iv
This legislation will also send an important message to MCPS school board members, which
reinforces the support for good nutrition and obesity prevention that the Council has shown for
our work in MCPS, so I urge you to pass this bill. Thank you.
The State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America: The Healthcare Costs of Obesity/
http://stateofobesity.org/healthcare-costs-obesity/
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. The Power
of Prevention: Chronic disease ... the public health challenge of the 21st century.
http://www.cdc.gov/ch ronicdisease/pdf/2009-Power-of-Preventi on. pdf
iii
American Diabetes Association: The Cost of Diabetes. http://www.diabetes.org/advocacy/news-events/cost-of­
ii
dia betes. html?referrer=https://www.google.com/#sthash.b8u h6ei p.dpuf
iv
Mason M, Zaganjor H, Bozlak CT, Lammel-Harmon C, Gomez-Feliciano L, Becker AB. Working With Community Partners to
Implement and Evaluate the Chicago Park District's 100% Healthier Snack Vending Initiative. Preventing Chronic Disease:
Public Health Research, Practice, and Policy 2014;11:140141. DOl: http://dx.doLorg/10.5888/pcd11.140141l!?.
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
SUGAR
TO:
FROM:
DATE:
RE:
The Honorable Roger Berliner, President and
Montgomery County Council Members
Shawn Mcintosh
Executive Director, Sugar Free Kids Maryland
February 28,2017
SUPPORT
-
Montgomery County Bill 1-17
- Healthy Vending Standards
KIDS
M,6.RYLAND
FREE
I'd like to thank President Berliner and County Council members for their time today. I am
Shawn Mcintosh, the Executive Director of Sugar Free Kids Maryland. We are a coalition of over
250 organizations, including organizations from Montgomery County, committed to reducing
consumption of sugary beverages and snack foods to reduce effects such as unhealthy weight,
type 2 diabetes and tooth decay on children and families. I am here today to ask you to support
Montgomery County Bill 1-17 - Healthy Vending Standards.
According to Robert Wood Johnson's County Health Rankings, Montgomery County is the
healthiest county in Maryland. However, when you dig beneath the surface of those numbers,
there are some significant disparities, and there's still the very real fact that more than 57% of
Montgomery County's adults are overweight or obese, cardiovascular disease is the number 1
cause of death and certain chronic disease rates continue to rise.
Healthy Montgomery, a county-led initiative, has identified a set of core measures, including
obesity rates, cardiovascular disease deaths, and diabetes hospitalizations, that need
improvement. Additionally, between fiscal year 2002 and fiscal year 2014, County Government
expenditures to provide health insurance to current and retired employees increased by 126%,
from $49 million to $110.8 million. It is in the County's best interest to do a better job when it
comes to improving the food environment on your property.
Currently, despite contracts that call for healthy options, the majority of vending machines on
county property offer little choice and mostly high calorie, high sugar, and high fat foods. You
cannot make a healthier choice when those choices don't exist. Montgomery County Bill 1-17
Healthy Vending Standards changes this dynamic. And by doing so, the county will also set an
example for smaller employers.
Is this bill the magic bullet to ending heart disease, diabetes, and unhealthy weights? No. But
the Institute of Medicine, Centers for Disease Control, American Heart and other health experts
agree that this bill is the perfect place to start. Reinventing vending machines will help lead to a
healthier, less expensive, and more productive and a healthier food environment for visitors to
county properties.
Creating a culture of health, where the healthy choice is the easy choice, is something that
Montgomery County can accomplish through many acts of leadership, including passing County
Bill 1-17 for HealthyVending Standards. I urge you to lead by example and pass this bill. Thank
you.
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
To:
Date:
Members, Montgomery County Council
February 28, 2017
From: Marla Hollander
SUPPORT - Montgomery County Bill 1-17 - Healthy Vending Standards
My name is Marla Hollander, I am a Montgomery County resident, mom and public health professional. I
am here to support this legislation to make healthy foods and drinks more available to all of us who may
visit government buildings, parks, libraries, or other places here in Montgomery County.
I also serve on the board for Real Food for Kids - Montgomery (RFKM). RFKM works tirelessly to
mobilize parents, students, educators and community members to promote policies, practices and
educational opportunities that improve the food environment and general health and well-being of
students in the Montgomery County Public Schools.
Children today face far too many obstacles that stand in the way of being able to make healthy choices,
both in the school and in the community. The environments in which we live, work and play often do
not support healthy choices. As a mom, I strive to provide my family healthy choices every day. But it's
challenging: I buy healthy food options; I teach my kids about healthy choices. But often, I am left
without healthy options. When I bring my children to public spaces, like city parks, libraries, or public
pools, it would be great to find healthy food or drink options, rather than the junk food that is currently
available. I ask the Council to help remove one of the obstacles that make it a daily challenge and
consider supporting the healthy vending standards put forward in MoCo Bill 1-17.
Obesity, heart disease, and other chronic diseases associated with unhealthy eating and drinking are
among the leading causes of death in our county. Sugary beverages and foods high in sugar, fat, salt and
calories take up most ofthe room in vending machines. Montgomery County Bill 1-17 represents an
important response to this known health problem. It provides that at least 50% ofthe food and drinks
offered meet reasonable nutrition standards that ensure choice and promote health. This bill is popular
amongst moms and would result in a healthier, happier workforce and residents and provide healthy
choices.
Vending machines are often the closest, easiest option for a quick snack. But vending machines that are
filled with high calorie, nutrient-poor junk food only contribute to the growing health problems associated
with unhealthy weight. l\Jearly 60% of Montgomery County adults are overweight or obese and too many
of our kids are, as well.
Healthy options are out there, but they aren't as readily available to the public as unhea Ithy choices. This
bill can change that. CB 1-17, which offers healthier options in public places could not only prevent more
people from dealing with the lifelong effects of chronic diseases, but could also decrease the economic
costs of these diet-related healthcare costs.
I ask you to support Montgomery County Bill 1-17 to give moms and kids access to healthy choices and
promote greater quality of life for all county residents.
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
SUPPORT: Bill 1-17
Vendin~
Machines
According to the American Heart Association, 1 in 3 children in America is overweight
causing childhood obesity to top drug abuse and smoking in terms of children's health concern.
My name is Katherine Reyes. As person who loves medicine and wants to be a cardiovascular
surgeon these statistics truly are disheartening. Many of these children are at risk or have type 2
diabetes. Their bodies have had so much sugar intake that their insulin isn't able to bond and
bring the levels down, causing the insulin to be overwhelmed and not bond with the glucose in
their bodies. The children like all diabetics are 2 to even 4 times more likely to have heart disease
problems, and are prone to psychological problems like depression, negative body image and low
self esteem.
The location of vending machines at Gaithersburg High School can be seen as an example
of how problematic the placement of these machines can impact our health. At school there is
only one vending machine that sells bottled water however, there are very few students who
actually go to it because it is at the end of the school close to the exit, instead of being near the
cafeteria. The majority of the students will eat and hang out at the cafeteria where there are two
vending machines fIlled with junk food and sugary drinks that once thirsty the students will
drink because they don't have a visible healthy option.
The same can be easily seen all around with vending machines. The snacks sold in these
machines don't have the calorie amount that they carry labeled on them as some of the drinks do.
As teenagers we're hungry all the time, however the need for healthier drinks and snacks are
crucial to our development and health. It's crucial to have healthier choices at eye level for us to
choose, crucial for the vendors of the machines to have at least half of the products to be healthy.
It's crucial because 88% of youth, the next generation in Maryland, have a sugar intake that is
more than the daily recommended amount. We need healthier choices because we've grown up
with commercials that push us to eat unhealthier products, that push us to break recommended
values each day, that when we consume too much because there are no healthy options, push us
to low self esteem, to being ashamed of our bodies.
Without regulations it is the same snacks in these vending machines that are causing us,
the youth, the next generation to have to be on an operating table because our arteries aren't
letting blood flow due to fat, to carry water or juice within our bags for our diabetic friends who
have to eat healthier but can't because there are no healthier options.
My name is Jacqueline Guzman and I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes two years ago.
In
my case, my pancreas doesn't produce insulin. But just like with type 2 diabetes I have to
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
monitor what I eat. HI consume something that has too much sugar or carbohydrates my
glucose levels
rise.
This is called Hyperglycemia and the effects of this are shortness of breath,
fatigue, and sleepiness. So the options for what I can get at vending machines are very limited. I
can choose to risk my health by getting what's in the vending machines. This is the reason why
on behalf of our Gaithersburg high school club we testify in support of bill 1-17.
We see that this bill is a step in the right direction towards healthy eating to prevent tooth
decay, diabetes, and other metabolic diseases from rising. Tbis is a small step towards something
big. With 74% of consumers trying to eat healthier, adding healthier snacks, this vending
machine proposal
will
give people more of a choice in what they would like to eat. While chips,
candy bars, and soda
will
still be available, it is crucial to have healthier options present.
A handful of us in the Club approve of this legislation because it includes non-dairy
products like soy and almond milk. For the people with different lifestyles like being vegan or
vegetarian, this bill will better provide snacks and drinks that fit our diet needs.
We are aware that the large food and drink companies
will
oppose this legislation because
they fear losing money. Even other people will oppose this because they might find the
alternatives snacks unpleasant. But we feel that health is more important than profits. People
should have different options as to what they can consume because they are paying with their
money. The health ofthe common people should not be compromised because of the want for
money that the companies have.
As the future generation, we support this bill. We, the people deserve,the right to have
healthy options presented to us in vending machines, and with sales of sodas and other sugary
drinks down, and sales for healthy snacks up, a change
is
needed. Thank you.
Katherine Reyes
Jacqueline Guzman
Caroline Boyle
Mikaylah Sayles
ArangLee
Mikayln Green
Marisa Godhard
Elias Villanueva
Elizabeth Solomon
Victoria Parris
Gina Jacob
Nieves Cruz
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
On the groWlds that as members of Sugar Free Kids at John
F.
Kennedy High School, and
supporters of Bill 1-17 would very much like this legislation be passed, we feel it's important to
Wlderstand all aspects of the Bill in all its importance.
To simply put it, a bill like this is the sole reason why we joined Sugar Free Kids Maryland. We fIrst and
foremost believe that providing the proper, benefIcial nutrition to a child while they are Wlder the care
and responsibility of a school and school faculty is just as fundamental as the knowledge they intake. It's
interesting to consider that schools encourage physical activity and a healthy lifestyle when the Board of
Education presents poor vending options for us. When a parent sends their child off to school, they
should fmd comfort in knowing that they won't be surroWlded by a plethora of unhealthy food options that
promote poor eating habits, in a place that's supposed to be safe for their kids, in every sense of the
word.
We believe that the courtesy of healthy food and drink options should be extended throughout the entirety
of Montgomery COWlty in places like Montgomery College, the MVA (where teenagers our age go often,
starting to get permits/licences), as well as the many other locations where you can fInd these machines
full of processed foods and sugary drinks. The truth of the matter is that the youth are not only limited to
being exposed to these unhealthy food options in just one place, they are everywhere, SurrOWlding us. We
think it's important that presenting benefIcial snack and beverage options as much as we can in as many
places as possible is very important, and that starts with this proposal.
The main premise of Bill 1-17 is to fIrst and foremost eradicate the majority of unhealthy snacks that
don't meet a specifIc health standard created in the best interest to the health of adolescents.
We really appreciate that there may be no more than 200 calories per package, all juice must be 100%
fruit, and less than 10% of calories can be from saturated fat etcetera.
We also like that the healthier choices cannot be significantly more expensive than those options that
don't meet the bills standards. We think it's unfair to be charged more for something that's better for you,
rather than the alternative. Another thing we especially enjoy is that in the future these machines would
sell products where we don't have to worry about added sweeteners, trans-fats, etc .. You should note the
importance of a clear distinction between the bad and good choices are. Additionally, as teenagers, we
want to make it clear that we Wlderstand the urges and desire for indulging on unhealthy foods and
drinks, and that banning them out of our COWlty vending machines entirely is out of the question. This is
why we are strongly lobbying for this bill to pass, we believe it is more than reasonable that it is asked
for at least half the choices of food and beverage items to meet the requirements of lIB-81 health
standards. The way we see it, if adolescents like us are only presented with unhealthy snack options,
what choice do we really have?
As you evaluate Bill 1-17, all we ask is that you see the accommodations for how rational they are. We
believe that just altering a portion of what is offered in our vending on COWlty property will impact our
population's health dramatically, more specifically targeting our youth to make better eating choices.
Vanessa Garcia,
LuUt
Shewan, Tim Catindig, Ziomara Herrera, Eden Tefera, KC Reyes
Sugar Free Kids
@
John F. Kennedy ffigh School
@
 PDF to HTML - Convert PDF files to HTML files
312812017
5052340 incoming attachment 103181 20170207 E-Mail Message 2017-02-07 02-02PM .hlml
From: Berliner's Office, Councilmember [Councilmember.Berliner@montgomerycountymd.gov]
Sent: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 2:02:25 PM
To: Council President
Subject: FW: Make the Healthy Choice an Easy Choice in Montgomery County's Public Places, Bill 1-17
-~,~,
-_._-,.-._---_.
From: Tracy Brazelton [mailto:tracy.brazelton@heart.org]
Sent: Tuesday, February 07,20172:02 PM
To: Berliner's Office, Councilmember <Councilmember.Berliner@montgomerycountymd.gov>
Subject: Make the Healthy Choice an Easy Choice in Montgomery County's Public Places, Bill 1-17
Dear Councilmember Roger Berliner,
Your residents and visitors need your help. What we eat and drink impacts our health, but we tend to eat what's
readily available. Providing healthy options in public vending machines gives employees and families the
opportunity to make better choices. That is why I ask you to support Bill 1-17, regarding healthy vending
standards, and ensure that healthier items are included among the offerings in vending machines on
Montgomery County property.
Making healthy food available in public places lets children and families eat healthy, decreasing their risk for
heart disease and diabetes. This has far-reaching impact for the long-term health of our citizens and future health
care costs incurred by individuals, families, and the County.
Jurisdictions around the country, including Baltimore City, Washington DC, Mecklenburg County NC,
Oklahoma City, and New Orleans have already done so. These localities have created a healthier environment
for government employees and visitors by ensuring that food and beverage choices are available in vending
machines on government property meet healthy nutrition standards.
I am asking you to do the same and lead by example. I, and many other people, are trying to eat healthier. Please
make the healthy choice an easy choice. Please support Bill 1-17 and make sure healthier items are included in
vending machines in County facilities.
Regards,
Tracy Brazelton
102 Holmard St
Gaithersburg, MD 20878"