Agenda Item 6B
October 10, 2017
Action
MEMORANDUM
October 6, 2017
TO:
FROM:
County Council
Robert H. Drummer, Senior Legislative Attorney
~
Action:
Bill 27-17, Human Rights and Civil Liberties - Human Trafficking Prevention
SUBJECT:
Committee -Established
Health and Human Services Committee recommendation (3-0): enact the Bill with
amendments.
Bill 27-17, Human Rights and Civil Liberties - Human Trafficking Prevention Committee -
Established, sponsored by Council President Berliner at the request of the County Executive was
introduced on July 25. A public hearing was held on September 19 and a Health and Human Services
Committee worksession was held on October 2.
Bill 27-17 would:
establish the Human Trafficking Prevention Committee;
(1)
define the membership of the Committee; and
(2)
define the duties and responsibilities of the Committee.
(3)
Background
The County currently has a Human Trafficking Task Force that meets to develop methods of
preventing human trafficking in the County. The current Human Trafficking Task Force is not a
permanent committee created by law. The Task Force would also like to be able to work with the
Commission for Women to raise and spend money on human trafficking related issues. Bill 27-17 would
establish a permanent committee with 15 voting members appointed by the Executive subject to Council
confirmation. Under the Bill, the Executive should appoint:
an employee of the Montgomery County Public Schools;
(1)
an employee of the County State's Attorney's Office;
(2)
a member of the Montgomery County Judiciary;
(3)
an employee of the County Sheriffs Office;
(4)
a member of the County Council;
( 5)
an employee of the County Police Department;
(6)
an employee of the County Department of Health and Human Services;
(7)
an employee of the County Office of Intergovernmental Relations;
(8)
an employee of the County Department of Correction and Rehabilitation;
(9)
(10) a member of the County's Commission for Women;
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(11)
(12)
(13)
(14)
a member of the Criminal Justice Coordinating Commission;
two voting members from two different advocacy organizations;
an owner or employee of a non-profit service provider; and
an academic advisor.
The Committee may also include an additional 8 nonvoting
ex officio
members.
The Bill would require the Committee to:
(1)
adopt rules and procedures as necessary to perform its functions;
(2)
keep a record of its activities and minutes of all meetings, which must be kept on file and
open to the public during business hours upon request;
(3)
develop and distribute information about human trafficking in the County;
(4)
promote educational activities that increase the understanding of human trafficking in the
County;
(5)
develop and recommend interagency coordinated strategies for reducing human trafficking
in the County;
advise the Council, the Executive, County agencies, and State elected officials about
(6)
human trafficking in the County, and recommend policies, programs, legislation, or
regulations necessary to reduce human trafficking;
(7)
submit an annual report by October 1 of each year to the Executive and Council on the
activities of the Committee, including the source and amount of any contributions received
to support the activities of the Committee; and
(8)
establish three subcommittees: the Legislative Subcommittee; the Victim Services
Subcommittee; and the Education and Outreach Subcommittee.
The County Attorney's Office found no legal issues with the Bill. See ©14.
Public Hearing
All 5 speakers at the hearing supported the Bill. Jodi Finkelstein, Executive Director of the
Commission for Women, testifying on behalf of the Executive (©15), Elissa Balsley, Montgomery County
National Organization for Women (©16), Nicole Drew, Montgomery County Commission for Women
(©17-18), Andrea Powell, FAIR Girls (©19-20), and Heidi Alvarez, University of Maryland SAFE Center
(©21-22) each stressed the need to develop strategies for responding to and preventing human trafficking
in the County. They each argued that a permanent Committee dedicated to this issue would help the
County to continue to work on eliminating human trafficking in the County.
HHS Worksession
Councilmembers Bucker and Katz attended the worksession m addition to the Committee
members. Jodi Finkelstein, Executive Director of the Commission for Women, represented the
Executive Branch. The Committee discussed the need for the new Committee with Ms.
Finkelstein. The Committee recommended (3-0) two amendments:
(1)
amend lines 23-24 to recommend that the Executive appoint a designee of the
Council instead of a Councilmember; and
(2)
delete lines 110-114 authorizing the Committee to solicit contributions from public
and private sources.
The Committee recommended (3-0) enactment of the Bill with these amendments.
2
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Issues
1.
What is the fiscal and economic impact of the Bill?
0MB estimated that the Bill would have no fiscal impact. See ©9. The Bill would require the
Commission for Women to staff the Committee. The Executive Director for the Commission for Women
estimated that she already spends 40-50% of her time working with the current Task Force, and that she
would spend the same amount of time working with the Committee instead of the Task Force if the Bill
is enacted.
2. Should the Human Trafficking Prevention Committee include a member of the County
Commission for Women and a member of the Criminal Justice Coordinating Commission?
County Code §2-148 states:
To promote broad participation, no individual should ordinarily serve more than 2
consecutive full terms or serve on more than one group at any one time. However, an
individual may serve on more than one group at the same time if the law that created a
committee requires or allows a member of that group to be selected from members of
another County group.
Although the standard procedure is to limit individuals to serving on 1 group at any one time, the
law does permit an individual to serve on more than 1 group in this situation.
Committee
recommendation (3-0):
no change.
3. Should the Committee include a Councilmember or a person designated by the Council?
The Bill would recommend that the Executive appoint a Councilmember to the Committee. There
are 2 Councilmembers currently serving on the Task Force, but they are generally represented by a Council
staff person.
If
a Councilmember is appointed as a voting member of the Committee, a Council staff
person asked to represent the Councilmember at a meeting would not be permitted to vote. The Committee
may want to consider amending the Bill to recommend that the Executive appoint a person designated by
the Council to represent the Council.
It
should be noted that the Council President or the President's
designee is also listed in the Bill as an
ex officio
non-voting member.
Committee recommendation (3-
0):
amend the Bill to recommend that the Executive appoint a person designated by the Council. See
lines 23-24 at ©2.
4. Should the Bill permit the Committee to solicit contributions from public and private sources to
support its activities?
County Code § 19A-16 generally prohibits a public employee from soliciting gifts to the employee
or another from a restricted donor. The Bill would waive this provision to permit members of the
Committee to solicit gifts to the Committee.
It
is unclear what the Committee would do with these funds.
None of the duties listed in the Bill for the Committee appear to require additional funds beyond the staff
resources from the Commission for Women.
In
fact, the 0MB fiscal impact statement estimates that the
Committee will not require additional funds beyond what the Task Force already spends. This is different
than the private County Economic Development Corporation created by the County. The Committee
3
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would be a permanent group that is part of the County government charged with recommending best
be
strategies to combat human trafficking. As part of the County government, the Committee would not
to
authorized to spend money that was not appropriated by the Council. There is no compelling reason
waive the Ethics rules on soliciting gifts for these County employees while serving on this Committee.
ive
Jodi Finkelstein, Executive Director of the Commission for Women, told the Committee that the Execut
did not oppose removing this provision.
Committee recommendation (3-0):
amend the Bill to delete
this provision. See lines 110-114 at ©6.
This packet contains:
Bill 27-17
Legislative Request Report
County Executive Memo
Fiscal and Economic Impact statement
County Attorney Bill Review Memorandum
Testimony
Jodi Finkelstein
Elissa Balsley
Nicole Drew
Andrea Powell
Heidi Alvarez
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Circle #
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7
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27-17
Bill No.
Human Rights and Civil
Concerning:
Liberties - Human Trafficking Prevention
Committee - Established
Revised: October 2, 2017 Draft No.
_A__
July 25, 2017
Introduced:
January 25, 2019
Expires:
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Enacted: _
Executive: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Effective: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Sunset Date: __,_,_N""on_.,., e,______ _ _ _ __
Ch. _ _ , Laws of Mont. Co. _ _ __
COUNTY COUNCIL
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY , MARYLAND
Lead Sponsor: Council President at the Request of the County Executive
AN ACT
to:
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
establish the Human Trafficking Prevention Committee;
define the membership of the Committee;
define the duties and responsibilities of the Committee; and
generally amend the laws governing the prevention of human trafficking.
By amending
Montgomery County Code
Chapter 27, Human Rights and Civil Liberties
Article VIII, Section 27-62
Boldface
Underlining
[Single boldface brackets]
Double underlining
[[Double boldface brackets]]
* * *
Heading or defined term.
Added to existing law by original bill.
Deleted.from existing law by original bill.
Added by amendment.
Deletedfrom existing law or the bill by amendment.
Existing law unaffected by bill.
The County Council for Montgomery County, Maryland approves the following Act:
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BILL No. 27-17
1
Sec
1.
Section 27-62 is amended as follows:
Article VIII [RESERVED] HUMAN TRAFFICKING PREVENTION
COMMITT EE.
Sec. 27-62. [Reserved.] Human Trafficking Prevention Committee.
2
3
4
5
W
Members.
The Executive must appoint, subject to confirmation by the
Council,
~
6
7
Human Trafficking Prevention Committee. The Committee
must have
12
voting members and
!!P
to 10
ex-officio
nonvoting
8
members. Each voting member must, when appointed, reside in the
County.
9
10
11
ill
Voting members.
The voting members must broadly reflect the
geographic, economic, and social diversity of the County. Each
voting member should be associated with an organization involved
in addressing some aspect of human trafficking or have~ direct
interest in an issue related to human trafficking.
(A)
One voting member should be an employee of the
Montgomer y County Public Schools.
(ID
One voting member should be an employee of the County
State's Attorney's Office.
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
.(Q
One voting member should be a member of the
Montgomer y County Judiciary.
20
21
.(ill
One voting member should be an employee of the County
Sheriffs Office.
22
23
.(fil
One voting member should be
~
[[member]] designee of the
County Council.
24
25
26
ill
One voting member should be an employee of the County
Police Department .
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BILL
No. 27-17
27
(ill
One voting member should be an employee of the County
Department of Health and Human Services.
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
(ID
One voting member should be an employee of the County
Office of Intergovernmental Relations.
ill
One voting member should be an employee of the County
Department of Correction and Rehabilitation.
ill
(K)
One voting member should be £! member of the County's
Commission for Women.
One voting member should be £! member of the Criminal
Justice Coordinating Commission.
ilJ
(M)
Two voting members should be from two different
advocacy organizations.
One voting member should be an owner or employee of£!
non-profit service provider.
41
42
43
44
45
(lli
.G)
One voting member should be an academic advisor.
Nonvoting members.
(A)
The Committee must also include the following
ex officio
nonvoting members:
ill
(ii)
(iii)
the Council President or the President's designee;
the County Executive or the Executive's designee;
the Director of the Department of Permitting Services
or the Director's designee;
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
(iv)
the Director of the Commission on Human Rights or
the Director's designee; and
.{y)
the Director of the Office of Community Partnerships
or the Director's designee; and
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BILL
NO. 27-17
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
ill)
The Committee may also include the following
ex officio
nonvoting members;
ill
One Senator or the Senator's designee from the
Montgomery County Delegation selected
by
the
Chair of the County's Senate Delegation;
(ii)
One Delegate or the Delegate's designee from the
Montgomery County Delegation selected
by
the
Chair of the County's House Delegation; and
(iii)
the President or the President's designee of an
appropriate health care agency located in the County
that serves victims of human trafficking.
ill
Term.
Each voting member serves~ 3wyear term. A voting member
must not serve more than
appointed to fill
~
2
consecutive
full terms. A member
vacancy serves the rest of the unexpired term.
Members continue in office until their successors are appointed
and qualified.
ill
f]l
Compensation.
Voting and nonvoting members must receive no
compensation for their services.
Removal.
The Executive, with the consent of the Council, may
remove
~
member for neglect or inability to perform the duties of
the office, misconduct in office, or
~
serious violation of law.
Before the Executive removes
~
member, the Executive must give
the member notice of the reason for removal and
opportunity to reply.
{hl
Chair and Vice Chair.
The Committee must annually elect one voting
member as chair and another as vice chair, and may elect other officers.
~
reasonable
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BILL
No.
27-17
79
80
{£)
Meetings.
The Committee may meet at the call of the chair as often as
required to perform its duties, but at least six times each year. The
Committee must also meet if£- majority of the voting members submit £-
written request for
~
81
82
83
meeting to the chair at least
1
days before the
proposed meeting. A majority of the voting members are £- quorum for
the transaction of business, and
~
majority of voting members present at
any meeting with
£-
quorum may take an action.
@
84
85
86
Staff.
The Commission for Women must provide the Committee with
staff, offices, and supplies as are appropriate for it.
must:
The Committee
- -
Duties.
-
87
88
89
90
91
ill
ill
adopt rules and procedures as necessary to perform its functions;
keep
~
record of its activities and minutes of all meetings, which
must be kept on file and open to the public during business hours
upon request;
92
93
94
ill
(4)
develop and distribute information about human trafficking in the
County;
promote educational activities that increase the understanding of
human trafficking in the County;
95
96
97
98
99
100
ill
®
develop and recommend interagency coordinated strategies for
reducing human trafficking in the County;
advise the Council, the Executive, County agencies, and State
elected officials about human trafficking in the County, and
recommend policies, programs, legislation, or regulations
necessary to reduce human trafficking;
101
102
103
.(1}
submit an annual report
.by
October 1 of each year to the Executive
and Council on the activities of the Committee, including the
104
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BILL
No. 27-17
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
11 7
118
119
120
121
source and amount of any contributions received to support the
activities of the Committee; and
.{fil
establish three subcommittees: the Legislative Subcommittee; the
Victim Services Subcommittee; and the Education and Outreach
Subcommittee.
ill
[[Contributions.
Notwithstanding the Ethics restrictions in Chapter 19A,
the Committee may solicit and accept contributions from public and
private sources to support the activities of the Committee. Committee
staff must not solicit or accept contributions for the Committee, but may
be assigned administrative tasks related to Committee fundraising.
(g}])
Advocacy.
The Committee must not engage in any advocacy activity at
the State or federal levels unless that activity is approved by the Office of
Intergovernmental Relations.
Sec 2. Transition - Staggered Terms.
The individual terms of the voting members must be staggered. Of the voting
members first appointed, five must be appointed for a 1-year term, five must be
appointed for a 2-year term, and five must be appointed for a 3-year term.
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LEGISLATIVE REQUEST REPORT
Bill 27-17
Human Rights and Civil Liberties
-
Human Trafficking Prevention Committee
-
Established
DESCRIPTION:
PROBLEM:
This Bill establishes a Human Trafficking Committee.
The current Human Trafficking Task Force is unable to officially
advise the County Executive or Council because it does not have the
written authority to do so. The Task Force would also like to be able
to work with the Commission for Women to raise and spend money on
human trafficking related issues.
Change the current Human Trafficking Task Force from a temporary
entity to a permanent Committee.
Commission for Women and the Office of the County Attorney.
Office of Management and Budget.
Office of Finance.
Subject to the general oversight of the County Executive and the
County Council. The Office of the County Attorney
will
evaluate for
form and legality.
Unknown
Kathryn Lloyd
Associate County Attorney
Office of the County Attorney
Jodi Finkelstein
Executive Director
Commission for Women
GOALS AND
OBJECTIVES:
COORDINATION:
FISCAL IMP ACT:
ECONOMIC
IMPACT:
EVALUATION:
EXPERIENCE
ELSEWHERE:
SOURCE OF
INFORMATION:
APPLICATION
WITHIN
MUNICIPALITIES:
PENALTIES:
NIA
NIA
F:\LAW\BILLS\l 727 Human Trafficking Prevention Committee\LRR.Docx
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!
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OFFICE OF TIIE COUNTY EXECUTIVE
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 208S0
Isiah Leggett
County Executive
MEMORANDUM
July 13, 2017
TO:
Roger Berliner, President
County Council
~
FROM:
SUBJECT:
Isiah Leggett, County Executiv~
~ -
Legislation Establishing the Montgomery County Human Trafficking Prevention
Committee
I am submitting for introduction the attached
bill
th.at would create the
Montgomery County Human Trafficking Prevention Committee. The purpose of the bill is to
move the current task force from a temporary entity to a permanent one.
The Montgomery County Human Trafficking Task Force was created in 2014 to
increase understanding of the issue of human trafficking in Montgomery County and to develop
interagency coordination of strategies for response and prevention. At the January 20, 2016, task
force meeting, Bobbe Mintz, Chair and Women's Commissioner, suggested that the task force
become a permanent entity that would function under the auspices of the Montgomery County
Commission for Women. The task force members in attendance unanimously agreed.
The nature of human trafficking consistently changes and needs long-term
attention. We must create a permanent entity that can address this horrific issue in a timely and
sensitive manner. Your assistance is appreciated.
IL/jf
Attachment
montgomerycountymd.gov/311 - ~ 301·251-4850 TTY
.;.
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.I
· .· I
Fiscal Impact Statement
Bill XX-17.:.. Committee on H~man Trafficking
1. Legi$lative Summary
The Montgomery County Human Trafficking Prevention Task Force formed three years
ago based on a recommendation from
the
Montgomery County Commission for Women
(CFW). This bill makes the Montgomery County
lluman
Trafficking Prevention Task .
Force a permanent committee under the CFW, allowing members to officially advise,
recommend, advocate, etc., on issues ·pertaining to
human
trafficking.
2.
An
estimate of changes in County revenues and expenditures regardless of whether
the revenues or expenditures are assumed in the recommended or approved
budget.
Includes source ofinformation , assumptions, and methodologies used.
According to
the
CFW,
this
bill would
have no
impact
on revenues or expenditures as
this simply
changes
the current
structure
from
a task
force
to a
committee.
The
committee
will
be
·staffed by the executive director of the CFW. The executive director currently
supports the task force which is chaired by a member of the CFW.
3. Revenue and expenditure estimates covering at least the next 6
fIScal
years.
See response
#2i
4. An actuarial analysis through the entire amortization period for each bill th3twouid
affect retiree pension or group insurance costs.
Not applicable.
5. An
estimate of
expenditures related
to
County's information technology (IT)
systems, including Enterprise Resource
Planning
(ERP) systems.
Not
applicable,
6. Later actions that may affect future
revenue and
expenditures if the
bill
authorizes
future spending.
Not applicable.
7. An
estimate of the staff time
needed
to
illlplement the
bill.
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~:
-
I
,-
. __ ·1
The executive director of the·CFW estimates 40-50% of her time will be spent on the
committee; howevery this
is
time·that was aiteady spent on the task force.
8.
An
explanation of how the addition of new staff
responsibilities
would affect other
duties.
This
is
currentlyapart
of
the executive
director's
duties.
However, as the committee
increases work volume, additional staffing qiay be needed.
9.
An
estimate of costs when an additional appropriation is needed.
Not
applicable.
10. A description of any variable that could affect revenue and cost estimates.
--
Not applicable.
11_.
Ranges of
revenue
or
expenditures that are uncertain
or
difficult
to
project.
Not
applicable.
12.
If
a bill is
likely
to have no fiscal illlpact,
why
that
is
the case.
A human trafficking prevention task force already exists
in
the county.
This
bill simply
changes the structure from a task
force
to a
committee._
13. Other fiscal
impacts-
or comments.
Not applicable.
14. The
following
contributed to
and
concurred
with this analysis~
-
Jodi
Finkelstei:i;i,.
Executive
Director, Montgomery
County Commission
for
Women
Corey Orlosky, Office of Management and Budget
Da~r-
.
..;
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Economic Impact Statement
Bill ##-17, Concerning: Committee on Human Trafficking
Background:
This legislation would create the Com.mission on Human Trafficking and outline the
· duties and responsibilities of the Commission on Human Trafficking. Currently, the
Human Trafficking
Task
Force (Task Force) is
unable
to officially advis~ the County
Executive and the County Cotincil
becatLSe
the
Task
Force does not have
written
authority to advise the County Executive and the County Council. Bill ##-17 would
change the Task Force from a temporary entity to a permanent Commission on Human
Trafficking.
1. The sources of information, assumptions, and
methodologies
used.
Sources of information: include:
• the
Commission
for Women
(Commission);
• U.S. Department of Justice (Justice Department);_
• Federal
Bureau
ofinvestigation
(FBI).
U.S.
Department of Justice;
• PolarisProject.org;
• International Labour Organization (ILO);
• DoSomething,org; and
• United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) USA.
According to the FBI, '"human trafficking, believed to
be
the third largest criminal
activity in the world, is a form a human slavery. Human trafficking includes forced
labor, domestic servitude, and commercial sex trafficking." The Justice Department
defines human trafficking a crime under Title 18, Chapter 77, United States Criminal
Code, as the act of compelling or coercing a victim person's
labor,
services, or
commercial sex acts. According to the Justice Department, the coercion may be
subtle or overt, physical or psychological.
According to UNICEFUSA, there are an estimated 21 million individuals trafficked
around
the
world and $32 billion in estimated
profits
generated globally from human
trafficking. The International Labour Organization el!.ii.rnates that of the
e~iimated
21
million individuals trafficked aroun.d the world, 68 ·percent are trapped in forced
labor, 26 percent of children, and 55 percent of women and girls. ILO also reports
that the forced
labor
and human trafficking
is
a $150 billion industry worldwide. In
2015, an
estimated
1 out of 5 endangered runaways report to the National Center for
Missing
and Exploited
Children were
likely child
sex trafficking victims
(source:
PolarisProj ect. org).
Finally,
the DoSomething.org reports that globally the average cost of a slave is
$90; .
The average age of a teen
who
enters the sex trade
in
the United State is 12 to 14
years old.
Many
of the teens are runaway girls. According to DoSomething.org,
betwe~n 14,500 and 17,500 are trafficked into the United States
every
year and
Page
1
of3
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Economic Impact Statement
Bill ##--17, Concerning: Committee-·on Human Trafficking
California '°ha,rbors three of the FBI's thirteen highest child sex. trafficking areas in
the
nation."
;
In
2016, the Montgomery County Police Department investigated 29 cases of human
i'
trafficking in the County and three involved minors. However, these numbers only
apply
to
those cases
that
a:re:reported and investigated. by the police. According to the
information prqvided
by
fue Com.mission, traffickers use violence, threats, deception
and other manipulative tactics to force or coerce women and men to engage in acts
against their will.
According to
data
provided by
the National Human
Trafficking Hotlinf? regarding
trafficking in the State of Maryland, nearly 540 cases in 2016 were reported to the
national hotline.
Of
those
540
cases,
116
were female victims
and
six were
male
victims, 71 victims were adults and 57 victims were minors. According to a map
provided in the .report, most of the repo1ted trafficking in the state occurred along the
·
Baltimore-Washington corridor.
In preparation for the economic impact statement, the Department ofFinance did not
.
.
develop meastJiable or quantitative assumptions or methodologies. Given the topic of
human trafficking, there is no quantitative analysis or
data of
the economic impact in
the County.
The
only economic assumptions are qualitative. For example, Finance
assumes that the victims of human trafficking have very modest incomes to meet a
certain standard of living and must resort to other sources ofincome and employment
that may result in becoming a victim of human trafficking. Finally, there are no
data
- on the amount ofincome received
by
the victims of human trafficking and fue amount
of income for traffickers. Without detailed data on the incomes of the victims and
traffickers, Finance cannot quantify the economic impacts with any specificity of
human trafficking, particltlarly incomes related to the underground economy related
to
illegal
activitie~.-
2. A description of
any
variable
t~at
could affect the economic
impact
estimates.
The variables that could affect the economic impact are the total number of victims
and traffickers. and fue amount of income,
if
any, they receive from human
trafficking. However, as stated
in
paragraph #1, data the total number and amount
of income
are
not available.
on
3. The Bill's positive or negative effect,
if
any on employment, spending, savings,
investment, incomes, and property values in the County.
Without specific economic
data
on-_the number of victims and traffickers and the
amount of income derived from human trafficking,
it
is difficult to quantify the
impact ofhuman trafficking on the County'·s economy. Without ec-0nomic data
to
determine the employment status of the victims
and
their source of income outside·
human trafficking (i.e., from legitimate economic activity), Finance cannot estimate
Page2 of3
@
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... -'-~ ~;j
···-
·1
. J.
i
Economic Impact Statement
Bill ##-17, Concerning: Committee on Human Trafficking
the economic loss to the County's economy through underemployment
by
the victims
through illegitimate economic activity.
4. If
a Bill is likely
to
have no economic impact,
why
is that the case?
Currently, there are
!10
detailed data.to measure the negative impact on the County's
economy.
5. The following contributed to or concurred with this analysis:
David Platt and
.Robeit Hagedoorn, Finance.
Alexandre
A.
Espinosa,. Director
Department of Finance
Page 3 of3
@
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Isiah Leggett
County Executive
Marc P. Hansen
County Attomey
OFFICE OF THE COUNT Y ATTOR NEY
MEMO RAND UM
TO:
VIA:
FROM:
DATE:
Jodi
Finkelstein, Executive Director, Commis sion for Women
Edward B. Lattner, Chief, Division of Governm ent Operations
W-
Kathryn Lloyd, Associate County Attomey")j-\.·,J
i,: .
Xlj)///7,/,I
/\
("L~V
Vv'iJ
(j
l
ell
August l, 2017
Bill 27-17, Human Rights and Civil Liberties - Human Trafficking Prevention
Committee - Established
RE:
I have read and reviewed Bil! 27-17, Human Rights and Civil Libertie s- Human
Trafficking Preventi on Committee - Established, and the bill raises no legal issues. The County
currently has a Human Trafficking Task Force, but the Human Traffick ing Task Force cannot
advise the County Executive or the County Council because it is not a permanent committee
established under County law. The task force also seeks to work with the Commission for
Women to raise and spend money on human trafficking related issues.
Bill 27-17
establishes a permane nt committee, the Human Trafficking Prevention
Committ ee, which consists of 15 voting member s appointe d
by
the County Executiv e subject to
confirma tion by the County Council.
The committee
will have
up
to eight nonvoting
ex
o.bzcio
members.
Bill 27-17
also defines the duties and responsibilities of the Human Trafficking
Prevention Committee.
cc:
Bonnie Kirkland, Assistant Chief Administrative Officer
Marc P. Hansen, County Attorney
Robert H. Drummer, Senior Legislative Attorney
101 Monroe Street, Rockville, Maryland 20850-254 0
(240) 777-6700 • TTD (240) 777-2545 • FAX (240) 777-6705
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TESTilVIONY ON BEHALF OF COUNTY EXECUTIVE ISIAH LEGGETT
ON BILL 27-17, HUMAN RIGHTS AND CIVIL LIBERTIES
-
HUMAN
TRAFFICKJNG PREVENTION COMMITTEE - ESTABLISHED
My name is Jodi Finkelstein, and I serve as the Executive Director of both the
Montgomery County Commission for Women and the County's Human
Trafficking Task Force. I am pleased to be testifying today on behalf of County
Executive Isiah Leggett in support ofBill 27-17.
The Task Force was created in 2014 to increase understanding of the issue of
human trafficking in Montgomery County and to develop interagency coordination
of strategies for response and prevention. The Task Force has suggested that it
become a permanent entity that would function under the auspices of the
Montgomery County Commission for Women.
Despite what many people assume, human trafficking is a significant problem in
Montgomery County. Many traffickers find Montgomery County to be an
especially attractive environment due to its central location and proximity to
affluence and disposable income. A permanent entity will ensure that the County
remains committed to the human trafficking issue on a long-term basis. This bill is
a simple one that will have a long term and positive impact.
Thank you for your continued support of this issue and this bill.
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My name is Elissa Balsley, and I am the Co-President of the Montgomery County chapter of the
National Organization for Women. I am here, today, to add my voice to the support for creating a
permanent Human Trafficking task force. MCNOW has been a part of the task force, since its inception,
with Jeannette Feldner serving as our representative. One of NOW's core issues, is ending violence
against women. While human trafficking affects many different groups, Polaris' statistics from 2016
show that, in the United States, sex trafficking is the most reported type of trafficking, and that women
and girls are 6 times more likely to be the victims in the reported incidents. The ever-changing nature
of human trafficking, makes it vital that there be a permanent task force installed, to best protect the
women and girls, and other victims, in Montgomery County. As always, MCNOW will be here to offer
any support it can, as the task force moves forward.
l)
®
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Testimony of Nicole Y. Drew, Commissioner, Montgomery County Commission for Women - Bill 27-17
Good afternoon. My name is Nicole Drew and I am a Commissioner with the
Mont gome ry County Comm ission for Women. We are an advisory board to
the Coun ty Executive, the County Council, the public, and agencies of the
county, state and federal governments on issues concerning women in
Mont gome ry County. On behal f of the Commission,
I
urge you to pass Bill
No. 27-17 .
Since 2014 , after recognizing the serious need to respond to the prevalence of
huma n trafficking in the County, County Executive Leggett established the
Hum an Trafficking Task Force. Since that time-, the Commission for Women
has work ed diligently with its partners on this task force - a group of
hardw orkin g advocates (both government and non-government entities)
comm itted to combatting the issue of human trafficking in Montgomery
County. The task force provided a diverse group of partners that understand
the impa ct and implementation of laws intended to protect victims, as well as
laws inten ded to deter this type of criminal activity. The proposed bill
conti nues to bring together partners that can provide an ongoing, holistic
appro ach to addressing this issue - from victims' issues to prevention to _
enforcement.
Hum an trafficking has been one of the' Commission for Wom en's top
priorities because it affects large numbers of vulnerable women and children.
Mary land has been deem ed a "hot spot" for this type of criminal activity
becau se of its close proximity to highways and airports. Therefore, the task
canno t stop at a task force; there needs to be continued efforts towards
reduc tion and prevention of this issue
in
our County. This bill will allow the
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No. 27-17
Testim ony of Nicol e Y. Drew, Commissioner, Comm ission for Wom en-Bi ll
2
Hum an Trafficking Prevention Committee to lead a long-tenn focus for the
. County in orde r to properly address the issue.
This bill also will give the Prevention Committee the authority needed to
officially advise the County Executive and the County Council to make
info nned decisions towards prevention. Additionally, with the Prevention
Committee under the auspices of the Commission for Women, it not only
furthers our mission but also effectively and efficiently utilizes the County's
resources. For instance, the Commission for Women's Executive Director
and its Commissioners are already currently supporting the various
prevention efforts of human trafficking through the Task Force.
Therefore, councilmembers, I respectfully urge you to support this bill and
allow the Commission for Wom en to continue its efforts towards the
education, outreach and prevention of human trafficking, and to the needs of
wom en and children in the County. Unfortunately, by its very nature, a task
force is temporary. This is a great time to commit to a long-tenn solution to
prev ent hum an trafficking by supporting this bill that makes this a permanent
committee under the Commission for Women.
Thank you.
(;j)
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Good afternoon Council members. My name is Andrea Powell and I am the founder
and Executive Director of FAIR Girls, a direct services agency providing emergency and
long-term care to human trafficking survivors in the greater metro D.C. area, including
Montgomery County. FAIR Girls is an active member of the Montgomery County Human
Trafficking Task Force, Maryland Human Trafficking Task Force, and the D.C. Human
Trafficking Task Force, as well as, a founding member of the Prince George's County
Task Force. Since 2010, FAIR Girls' staff has co-chaired the training committee of the
D.C. Anti Trafficking Task Force and currently serves as the co-chair of the policy
working group. I am here today in support of Bill 27-17.
Over the last decade, FAIR Girls has served more than 1,000 young women and girls
who have survived human trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation. In 2014,
FAIR Girls opened the Vida Home, a 90-day safe home for young women survivors of
trafficking aged 18 to 26. It is currently the only home of its type in Washington, D.C.
serving this population of survivors. Our Vida Home provides safe shelter and life skills
to 50 girls a year ages 18 to 24. Approximately 50% of the young women we currently
serve are from or were trafficked into Maryland. Approximately 90% of the girls we
serve in the OMV area are girls of color, 70% have or were in the child welfare system, ·
and 80% experienced homelessness prior to being trafficked. Our clients are 10%
immigrants and 20% identify as LGBTQ. They are wrapped up in the child welfare
system and have experienced domestic violence (74%) and child abuse (90%) at
alarming rates. They suffer debilitating bouts of post-traumatic stress disorder,
depression, and suicidal thoughts at exponential rates. Our work focuses on building
deep relationships with trafficking survivors so that they can go from crisis to thriving by
accessing both their individual strengths and talents and desperately needed resources.
It is our experience at FAIR Girls that an active and informed anti-human trafficking task
force is critical in the fight the tide of this modern day slavery that plagues our
communities. Effective task forces, such as the current Montgomery County Human
Trafficking Task Force, focus on four critical areas in an concerted effort to both better
serve individual survivors and systemically combat the crime of human trafficking. First,
training committees, such as the one I co-chair for the D.C. Anti-Trafficking Task Force,
develop and deliver trainings within the community, in particular to frontline responders,
such as law enforcement and medical professionals. At FAIR Girls, approximately 80%
of the young women referred to our safe home were identified by law enforcement.
Thus, without coordinated advocate and survivor-informed training, far fewer victims
would be identified. Second, once victims are identified, it is critical that they receive
coordinated, multi-disciplinary services to ensure their needs are addressed, they
remain safe, and they can begin to rebuild their lives after trafficking. Through our
engagement in the Montgomery County Human Trafficking Task Force, FAIR Girls
®
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works closely and collaboratively with other Maryland direct services providers, such as
SAFE Center and Ayuda. These relationships and coordination built through the
Montgomery County Human Trafficking Task Force better ensure that a survivor is
referred to the most appropriate resources and services. Third, the collective knowledge
and experience of members of an anti-trafficking task force are critical to the
development of survivor-informed policies and legislation. Policies and laws that are
grounded in the lived experiences of trafficking survivors, experiences shared among
members of an engaged and well-rounded task force, will have a better chance of truly
shifting the landscape of the community's response to the needs of survivors. Finally,
anti-trafficking task forces, such as the Montgomery County Human Trafficking Task
Force, are vital to raising public awareness of human trafficking in the jurisdiction where
they operate. This comes in the form of advising and interacting with our public and
government officials, prevention education classes in our schools, p'oster campaigns in
our hotels, and other critical public outreach efforts.
I would like to close by sharing the story of one young woman who is a survivor of
human trafficking whose exploitation took place right here in Montgomery County. In
2014, an 18 year old homeless girl was trafficked from her home state by a seasoned
pimp. Her exploitation spanned four states before she was found by law enforcement in
Montgomery County, identified as a victim not a criminal, and was referred to FAIR Girls
for safe housing. Within 12 hours, she ·was safely housed in our Vida Home, receiving
support and legal protection. Today, she is a thriving college student, gainfully
employed, and looking forward to a life free of exploitation and trafficking. Her road to
recovery will be a lifelong journey, but that recovery may never have begun but for the
coordinated effort of various members of the Montgomery County Human Trafficking
Task Force.
®
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SAFE CENTER
FOR HUMAN TRAFFICKING SURVIVORS
UNIVERSITY
Of
MARYLAND
County Council for Montgomery County, Maryl
and
Testimony before the County Council for Public Hearing
in Support ofBill 27-17
Human Rights and Civil Liberties - Human Trafficking
Prevention Committee-Established
September 19, 2017
Heidi Alvarez, MA
Director of Social Services at University of Maryland SAF
E Center
Co-chair of Human Trafficking Task Force Victim Service
s Committee
Thank you for the opportunity to testify here today in sup
port ofB ill 27-17. My name is
Heidi Alvarez and I am a co-chair of the Montgomery Cou
nty Human Trafficking Task Force
Victim Services Committee. I am also the Director of Soc
ial Services at the University of
Maryland SAFE Center for Human Trafficking Survivors.
The SAFE Center is the first university-based comprehens
ive direct services, research, and
advocacy center on human trafficking.
It
is an initiative
of the University of Maryland, College
Park, and the University of Maryland, Baltimore through
their strategic partnership, MPowering
the State. At the SAFE Center, we provide direct bilingu
al services to survivors of sex and labor
trafficking regardless of nationality, gender, or age. We
were founded by Ambassador Susan
Esserman, who is also the SAFE Center's Director, and
we opened in May of 2016. Our initial
focus is on Montgomery County and Prince George's Cou
nty, with a longer-term focus on the
state of Maryland.
Onsite and through partnerships, the SAFE Center provide
s intensive case management, legal
immigration services, mental health therapy, economic emp
owerment programs, primary
medical care, and food and clothing to human trafficking
survivors. In the 16 months since we
opened our doors, we have received 61 referrals and hav
e served
45
victims of trafficking.
Seventeen of the victims referred to us have been from Mo
ntgomery County or were trafficked
in Montgomery County. They have been U.S. citizens and
foreign nationals, adults and minors.
We know that the victims we are seeing are only the tip
of the iceberg. Trafficking is a
hidden crime because traffickers use violence, threats, and
coercion to prevent their victims from
seeking help. Now that the SAFE Center is more fully ope
rational, we expect to see more
Montgomery County clients as we do broader outreach
and deepen our involvement in this
county.
The Montgomery County Human Trafficking Task Force
is vitally important for bringing
human trafficking victims out of the shadows. The task
force raises awareness about human
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 923 College Park, MD 20741 •
301.314.7233 (SAFE)• umdsafccenter.org
@
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S.AFE CE NT ER
FOR HUNAN TRAFFICKING
SURVIVORS
M~DVrfllHNG
TH[
ST/.H:
UNJVERSffY OF
MARY LAND
trafficking in the county. It also works to help close gaps in victim services by coordinatin
g the
count y's service providers and law enforcement resources.
Bill 27-17 will strengthen the task force' s efforts to address huma n trafficking
in
the count
y
by making the
task
force a permanent committee able to officially advise the County Execu
tive
and Council, and able to work with the Commission for Women to raise neede d funds for
huma n
trafficking related issues.
For all of these reasons, the SAFE Center supports the passage ofBil l 27-17. Thank you
again for your time and attention to this vital issue.
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 923 College Park, MD 20741 • 301.314.7233 (SAFE) • umdsafecenter.or
g
@
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Agenda Item 6B
October 10, 2017
Action
MEMORANDUM
October 6, 2017
TO:
FROM:
County Council
Robert H. Drummer, Senior Legislative Attorney
~
Action:
Bill 27-17, Human Rights and Civil Liberties - Human Trafficking Prevention
SUBJECT:
Committee -Established
Health and Human Services Committee recommendation (3-0): enact the Bill with
amendments.
Bill 27-17, Human Rights and Civil Liberties - Human Trafficking Prevention Committee -
Established, sponsored by Council President Berliner at the request of the County Executive was
introduced on July 25. A public hearing was held on September 19 and a Health and Human Services
Committee worksession was held on October 2.
Bill 27-17 would:
establish the Human Trafficking Prevention Committee;
(1)
define the membership of the Committee; and
(2)
define the duties and responsibilities of the Committee.
(3)
Background
The County currently has a Human Trafficking Task Force that meets to develop methods of
preventing human trafficking in the County. The current Human Trafficking Task Force is not a
permanent committee created by law. The Task Force would also like to be able to work with the
Commission for Women to raise and spend money on human trafficking related issues. Bill 27-17 would
establish a permanent committee with 15 voting members appointed by the Executive subject to Council
confirmation. Under the Bill, the Executive should appoint:
an employee of the Montgomery County Public Schools;
(1)
an employee of the County State's Attorney's Office;
(2)
a member of the Montgomery County Judiciary;
(3)
an employee of the County Sheriffs Office;
(4)
a member of the County Council;
( 5)
an employee of the County Police Department;
(6)
an employee of the County Department of Health and Human Services;
(7)
an employee of the County Office of Intergovernmental Relations;
(8)
an employee of the County Department of Correction and Rehabilitation;
(9)
(10) a member of the County's Commission for Women;
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(11)
(12)
(13)
(14)
a member of the Criminal Justice Coordinating Commission;
two voting members from two different advocacy organizations;
an owner or employee of a non-profit service provider; and
an academic advisor.
The Committee may also include an additional 8 nonvoting
ex officio
members.
The Bill would require the Committee to:
(1)
adopt rules and procedures as necessary to perform its functions;
(2)
keep a record of its activities and minutes of all meetings, which must be kept on file and
open to the public during business hours upon request;
(3)
develop and distribute information about human trafficking in the County;
(4)
promote educational activities that increase the understanding of human trafficking in the
County;
(5)
develop and recommend interagency coordinated strategies for reducing human trafficking
in the County;
advise the Council, the Executive, County agencies, and State elected officials about
(6)
human trafficking in the County, and recommend policies, programs, legislation, or
regulations necessary to reduce human trafficking;
(7)
submit an annual report by October 1 of each year to the Executive and Council on the
activities of the Committee, including the source and amount of any contributions received
to support the activities of the Committee; and
(8)
establish three subcommittees: the Legislative Subcommittee; the Victim Services
Subcommittee; and the Education and Outreach Subcommittee.
The County Attorney's Office found no legal issues with the Bill. See ©14.
Public Hearing
All 5 speakers at the hearing supported the Bill. Jodi Finkelstein, Executive Director of the
Commission for Women, testifying on behalf of the Executive (©15), Elissa Balsley, Montgomery County
National Organization for Women (©16), Nicole Drew, Montgomery County Commission for Women
(©17-18), Andrea Powell, FAIR Girls (©19-20), and Heidi Alvarez, University of Maryland SAFE Center
(©21-22) each stressed the need to develop strategies for responding to and preventing human trafficking
in the County. They each argued that a permanent Committee dedicated to this issue would help the
County to continue to work on eliminating human trafficking in the County.
HHS Worksession
Councilmembers Bucker and Katz attended the worksession m addition to the Committee
members. Jodi Finkelstein, Executive Director of the Commission for Women, represented the
Executive Branch. The Committee discussed the need for the new Committee with Ms.
Finkelstein. The Committee recommended (3-0) two amendments:
(1)
amend lines 23-24 to recommend that the Executive appoint a designee of the
Council instead of a Councilmember; and
(2)
delete lines 110-114 authorizing the Committee to solicit contributions from public
and private sources.
The Committee recommended (3-0) enactment of the Bill with these amendments.
2
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Issues
1.
What is the fiscal and economic impact of the Bill?
0MB estimated that the Bill would have no fiscal impact. See ©9. The Bill would require the
Commission for Women to staff the Committee. The Executive Director for the Commission for Women
estimated that she already spends 40-50% of her time working with the current Task Force, and that she
would spend the same amount of time working with the Committee instead of the Task Force if the Bill
is enacted.
2. Should the Human Trafficking Prevention Committee include a member of the County
Commission for Women and a member of the Criminal Justice Coordinating Commission?
County Code §2-148 states:
To promote broad participation, no individual should ordinarily serve more than 2
consecutive full terms or serve on more than one group at any one time. However, an
individual may serve on more than one group at the same time if the law that created a
committee requires or allows a member of that group to be selected from members of
another County group.
Although the standard procedure is to limit individuals to serving on 1 group at any one time, the
law does permit an individual to serve on more than 1 group in this situation.
Committee
recommendation (3-0):
no change.
3. Should the Committee include a Councilmember or a person designated by the Council?
The Bill would recommend that the Executive appoint a Councilmember to the Committee. There
are 2 Councilmembers currently serving on the Task Force, but they are generally represented by a Council
staff person.
If
a Councilmember is appointed as a voting member of the Committee, a Council staff
person asked to represent the Councilmember at a meeting would not be permitted to vote. The Committee
may want to consider amending the Bill to recommend that the Executive appoint a person designated by
the Council to represent the Council.
It
should be noted that the Council President or the President's
designee is also listed in the Bill as an
ex officio
non-voting member.
Committee recommendation (3-
0):
amend the Bill to recommend that the Executive appoint a person designated by the Council. See
lines 23-24 at ©2.
4. Should the Bill permit the Committee to solicit contributions from public and private sources to
support its activities?
County Code § 19A-16 generally prohibits a public employee from soliciting gifts to the employee
or another from a restricted donor. The Bill would waive this provision to permit members of the
Committee to solicit gifts to the Committee.
It
is unclear what the Committee would do with these funds.
None of the duties listed in the Bill for the Committee appear to require additional funds beyond the staff
resources from the Commission for Women.
In
fact, the 0MB fiscal impact statement estimates that the
Committee will not require additional funds beyond what the Task Force already spends. This is different
than the private County Economic Development Corporation created by the County. The Committee
3
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would be a permanent group that is part of the County government charged with recommending best
be
strategies to combat human trafficking. As part of the County government, the Committee would not
to
authorized to spend money that was not appropriated by the Council. There is no compelling reason
waive the Ethics rules on soliciting gifts for these County employees while serving on this Committee.
ive
Jodi Finkelstein, Executive Director of the Commission for Women, told the Committee that the Execut
did not oppose removing this provision.
Committee recommendation (3-0):
amend the Bill to delete
this provision. See lines 110-114 at ©6.
This packet contains:
Bill 27-17
Legislative Request Report
County Executive Memo
Fiscal and Economic Impact statement
County Attorney Bill Review Memorandum
Testimony
Jodi Finkelstein
Elissa Balsley
Nicole Drew
Andrea Powell
Heidi Alvarez
F:\LAW\BILLS\1727 Human Trafficking Prevention Committee\Action Memo.Docx
Circle #
1
7
8
9
14
15
16
17
19
21
4
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27-17
Bill No.
Human Rights and Civil
Concerning:
Liberties - Human Trafficking Prevention
Committee - Established
Revised: October 2, 2017 Draft No.
_A__
July 25, 2017
Introduced:
January 25, 2019
Expires:
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Enacted: _
Executive: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Effective: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Sunset Date: __,_,_N""on_.,., e,______ _ _ _ __
Ch. _ _ , Laws of Mont. Co. _ _ __
COUNTY COUNCIL
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY , MARYLAND
Lead Sponsor: Council President at the Request of the County Executive
AN ACT
to:
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
establish the Human Trafficking Prevention Committee;
define the membership of the Committee;
define the duties and responsibilities of the Committee; and
generally amend the laws governing the prevention of human trafficking.
By amending
Montgomery County Code
Chapter 27, Human Rights and Civil Liberties
Article VIII, Section 27-62
Boldface
Underlining
[Single boldface brackets]
Double underlining
[[Double boldface brackets]]
* * *
Heading or defined term.
Added to existing law by original bill.
Deleted.from existing law by original bill.
Added by amendment.
Deletedfrom existing law or the bill by amendment.
Existing law unaffected by bill.
The County Council for Montgomery County, Maryland approves the following Act:
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BILL No. 27-17
1
Sec
1.
Section 27-62 is amended as follows:
Article VIII [RESERVED] HUMAN TRAFFICKING PREVENTION
COMMITT EE.
Sec. 27-62. [Reserved.] Human Trafficking Prevention Committee.
2
3
4
5
W
Members.
The Executive must appoint, subject to confirmation by the
Council,
~
6
7
Human Trafficking Prevention Committee. The Committee
must have
12
voting members and
!!P
to 10
ex-officio
nonvoting
8
members. Each voting member must, when appointed, reside in the
County.
9
10
11
ill
Voting members.
The voting members must broadly reflect the
geographic, economic, and social diversity of the County. Each
voting member should be associated with an organization involved
in addressing some aspect of human trafficking or have~ direct
interest in an issue related to human trafficking.
(A)
One voting member should be an employee of the
Montgomer y County Public Schools.
(ID
One voting member should be an employee of the County
State's Attorney's Office.
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
.(Q
One voting member should be a member of the
Montgomer y County Judiciary.
20
21
.(ill
One voting member should be an employee of the County
Sheriffs Office.
22
23
.(fil
One voting member should be
~
[[member]] designee of the
County Council.
24
25
26
ill
One voting member should be an employee of the County
Police Department .
@-t:\law\bills\17 27 human trafficking prevention committee\bill 4.docx
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BILL
No. 27-17
27
(ill
One voting member should be an employee of the County
Department of Health and Human Services.
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
(ID
One voting member should be an employee of the County
Office of Intergovernmental Relations.
ill
One voting member should be an employee of the County
Department of Correction and Rehabilitation.
ill
(K)
One voting member should be £! member of the County's
Commission for Women.
One voting member should be £! member of the Criminal
Justice Coordinating Commission.
ilJ
(M)
Two voting members should be from two different
advocacy organizations.
One voting member should be an owner or employee of£!
non-profit service provider.
41
42
43
44
45
(lli
.G)
One voting member should be an academic advisor.
Nonvoting members.
(A)
The Committee must also include the following
ex officio
nonvoting members:
ill
(ii)
(iii)
the Council President or the President's designee;
the County Executive or the Executive's designee;
the Director of the Department of Permitting Services
or the Director's designee;
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
(iv)
the Director of the Commission on Human Rights or
the Director's designee; and
.{y)
the Director of the Office of Community Partnerships
or the Director's designee; and
0:\law\bills\172 7 human trafficking prevention committee\bill 4.docx
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BILL
NO. 27-17
53
54
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ill)
The Committee may also include the following
ex officio
nonvoting members;
ill
One Senator or the Senator's designee from the
Montgomery County Delegation selected
by
the
Chair of the County's Senate Delegation;
(ii)
One Delegate or the Delegate's designee from the
Montgomery County Delegation selected
by
the
Chair of the County's House Delegation; and
(iii)
the President or the President's designee of an
appropriate health care agency located in the County
that serves victims of human trafficking.
ill
Term.
Each voting member serves~ 3wyear term. A voting member
must not serve more than
appointed to fill
~
2
consecutive
full terms. A member
vacancy serves the rest of the unexpired term.
Members continue in office until their successors are appointed
and qualified.
ill
f]l
Compensation.
Voting and nonvoting members must receive no
compensation for their services.
Removal.
The Executive, with the consent of the Council, may
remove
~
member for neglect or inability to perform the duties of
the office, misconduct in office, or
~
serious violation of law.
Before the Executive removes
~
member, the Executive must give
the member notice of the reason for removal and
opportunity to reply.
{hl
Chair and Vice Chair.
The Committee must annually elect one voting
member as chair and another as vice chair, and may elect other officers.
~
reasonable
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BILL
No.
27-17
79
80
{£)
Meetings.
The Committee may meet at the call of the chair as often as
required to perform its duties, but at least six times each year. The
Committee must also meet if£- majority of the voting members submit £-
written request for
~
81
82
83
meeting to the chair at least
1
days before the
proposed meeting. A majority of the voting members are £- quorum for
the transaction of business, and
~
majority of voting members present at
any meeting with
£-
quorum may take an action.
@
84
85
86
Staff.
The Commission for Women must provide the Committee with
staff, offices, and supplies as are appropriate for it.
must:
The Committee
- -
Duties.
-
87
88
89
90
91
ill
ill
adopt rules and procedures as necessary to perform its functions;
keep
~
record of its activities and minutes of all meetings, which
must be kept on file and open to the public during business hours
upon request;
92
93
94
ill
(4)
develop and distribute information about human trafficking in the
County;
promote educational activities that increase the understanding of
human trafficking in the County;
95
96
97
98
99
100
ill
®
develop and recommend interagency coordinated strategies for
reducing human trafficking in the County;
advise the Council, the Executive, County agencies, and State
elected officials about human trafficking in the County, and
recommend policies, programs, legislation, or regulations
necessary to reduce human trafficking;
101
102
103
.(1}
submit an annual report
.by
October 1 of each year to the Executive
and Council on the activities of the Committee, including the
104
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BILL
No. 27-17
105
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114
115
116
11 7
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120
121
source and amount of any contributions received to support the
activities of the Committee; and
.{fil
establish three subcommittees: the Legislative Subcommittee; the
Victim Services Subcommittee; and the Education and Outreach
Subcommittee.
ill
[[Contributions.
Notwithstanding the Ethics restrictions in Chapter 19A,
the Committee may solicit and accept contributions from public and
private sources to support the activities of the Committee. Committee
staff must not solicit or accept contributions for the Committee, but may
be assigned administrative tasks related to Committee fundraising.
(g}])
Advocacy.
The Committee must not engage in any advocacy activity at
the State or federal levels unless that activity is approved by the Office of
Intergovernmental Relations.
Sec 2. Transition - Staggered Terms.
The individual terms of the voting members must be staggered. Of the voting
members first appointed, five must be appointed for a 1-year term, five must be
appointed for a 2-year term, and five must be appointed for a 3-year term.
G:\law\b ills\1727 human trafficking prevention committee\bill 4.docx
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LEGISLATIVE REQUEST REPORT
Bill 27-17
Human Rights and Civil Liberties
-
Human Trafficking Prevention Committee
-
Established
DESCRIPTION:
PROBLEM:
This Bill establishes a Human Trafficking Committee.
The current Human Trafficking Task Force is unable to officially
advise the County Executive or Council because it does not have the
written authority to do so. The Task Force would also like to be able
to work with the Commission for Women to raise and spend money on
human trafficking related issues.
Change the current Human Trafficking Task Force from a temporary
entity to a permanent Committee.
Commission for Women and the Office of the County Attorney.
Office of Management and Budget.
Office of Finance.
Subject to the general oversight of the County Executive and the
County Council. The Office of the County Attorney
will
evaluate for
form and legality.
Unknown
Kathryn Lloyd
Associate County Attorney
Office of the County Attorney
Jodi Finkelstein
Executive Director
Commission for Women
GOALS AND
OBJECTIVES:
COORDINATION:
FISCAL IMP ACT:
ECONOMIC
IMPACT:
EVALUATION:
EXPERIENCE
ELSEWHERE:
SOURCE OF
INFORMATION:
APPLICATION
WITHIN
MUNICIPALITIES:
PENALTIES:
NIA
NIA
F:\LAW\BILLS\l 727 Human Trafficking Prevention Committee\LRR.Docx
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!
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OFFICE OF TIIE COUNTY EXECUTIVE
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 208S0
Isiah Leggett
County Executive
MEMORANDUM
July 13, 2017
TO:
Roger Berliner, President
County Council
~
FROM:
SUBJECT:
Isiah Leggett, County Executiv~
~ -
Legislation Establishing the Montgomery County Human Trafficking Prevention
Committee
I am submitting for introduction the attached
bill
th.at would create the
Montgomery County Human Trafficking Prevention Committee. The purpose of the bill is to
move the current task force from a temporary entity to a permanent one.
The Montgomery County Human Trafficking Task Force was created in 2014 to
increase understanding of the issue of human trafficking in Montgomery County and to develop
interagency coordination of strategies for response and prevention. At the January 20, 2016, task
force meeting, Bobbe Mintz, Chair and Women's Commissioner, suggested that the task force
become a permanent entity that would function under the auspices of the Montgomery County
Commission for Women. The task force members in attendance unanimously agreed.
The nature of human trafficking consistently changes and needs long-term
attention. We must create a permanent entity that can address this horrific issue in a timely and
sensitive manner. Your assistance is appreciated.
IL/jf
Attachment
montgomerycountymd.gov/311 - ~ 301·251-4850 TTY
.;.
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.I
· .· I
Fiscal Impact Statement
Bill XX-17.:.. Committee on H~man Trafficking
1. Legi$lative Summary
The Montgomery County Human Trafficking Prevention Task Force formed three years
ago based on a recommendation from
the
Montgomery County Commission for Women
(CFW). This bill makes the Montgomery County
lluman
Trafficking Prevention Task .
Force a permanent committee under the CFW, allowing members to officially advise,
recommend, advocate, etc., on issues ·pertaining to
human
trafficking.
2.
An
estimate of changes in County revenues and expenditures regardless of whether
the revenues or expenditures are assumed in the recommended or approved
budget.
Includes source ofinformation , assumptions, and methodologies used.
According to
the
CFW,
this
bill would
have no
impact
on revenues or expenditures as
this simply
changes
the current
structure
from
a task
force
to a
committee.
The
committee
will
be
·staffed by the executive director of the CFW. The executive director currently
supports the task force which is chaired by a member of the CFW.
3. Revenue and expenditure estimates covering at least the next 6
fIScal
years.
See response
#2i
4. An actuarial analysis through the entire amortization period for each bill th3twouid
affect retiree pension or group insurance costs.
Not applicable.
5. An
estimate of
expenditures related
to
County's information technology (IT)
systems, including Enterprise Resource
Planning
(ERP) systems.
Not
applicable,
6. Later actions that may affect future
revenue and
expenditures if the
bill
authorizes
future spending.
Not applicable.
7. An
estimate of the staff time
needed
to
illlplement the
bill.
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~:
-
I
,-
. __ ·1
The executive director of the·CFW estimates 40-50% of her time will be spent on the
committee; howevery this
is
time·that was aiteady spent on the task force.
8.
An
explanation of how the addition of new staff
responsibilities
would affect other
duties.
This
is
currentlyapart
of
the executive
director's
duties.
However, as the committee
increases work volume, additional staffing qiay be needed.
9.
An
estimate of costs when an additional appropriation is needed.
Not
applicable.
10. A description of any variable that could affect revenue and cost estimates.
--
Not applicable.
11_.
Ranges of
revenue
or
expenditures that are uncertain
or
difficult
to
project.
Not
applicable.
12.
If
a bill is
likely
to have no fiscal illlpact,
why
that
is
the case.
A human trafficking prevention task force already exists
in
the county.
This
bill simply
changes the structure from a task
force
to a
committee._
13. Other fiscal
impacts-
or comments.
Not applicable.
14. The
following
contributed to
and
concurred
with this analysis~
-
Jodi
Finkelstei:i;i,.
Executive
Director, Montgomery
County Commission
for
Women
Corey Orlosky, Office of Management and Budget
Da~r-
.
..;
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.
-
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.
_,_.
__
- ..-
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Economic Impact Statement
Bill ##-17, Concerning: Committee on Human Trafficking
Background:
This legislation would create the Com.mission on Human Trafficking and outline the
· duties and responsibilities of the Commission on Human Trafficking. Currently, the
Human Trafficking
Task
Force (Task Force) is
unable
to officially advis~ the County
Executive and the County Cotincil
becatLSe
the
Task
Force does not have
written
authority to advise the County Executive and the County Council. Bill ##-17 would
change the Task Force from a temporary entity to a permanent Commission on Human
Trafficking.
1. The sources of information, assumptions, and
methodologies
used.
Sources of information: include:
• the
Commission
for Women
(Commission);
• U.S. Department of Justice (Justice Department);_
• Federal
Bureau
ofinvestigation
(FBI).
U.S.
Department of Justice;
• PolarisProject.org;
• International Labour Organization (ILO);
• DoSomething,org; and
• United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) USA.
According to the FBI, '"human trafficking, believed to
be
the third largest criminal
activity in the world, is a form a human slavery. Human trafficking includes forced
labor, domestic servitude, and commercial sex trafficking." The Justice Department
defines human trafficking a crime under Title 18, Chapter 77, United States Criminal
Code, as the act of compelling or coercing a victim person's
labor,
services, or
commercial sex acts. According to the Justice Department, the coercion may be
subtle or overt, physical or psychological.
According to UNICEFUSA, there are an estimated 21 million individuals trafficked
around
the
world and $32 billion in estimated
profits
generated globally from human
trafficking. The International Labour Organization el!.ii.rnates that of the
e~iimated
21
million individuals trafficked aroun.d the world, 68 ·percent are trapped in forced
labor, 26 percent of children, and 55 percent of women and girls. ILO also reports
that the forced
labor
and human trafficking
is
a $150 billion industry worldwide. In
2015, an
estimated
1 out of 5 endangered runaways report to the National Center for
Missing
and Exploited
Children were
likely child
sex trafficking victims
(source:
PolarisProj ect. org).
Finally,
the DoSomething.org reports that globally the average cost of a slave is
$90; .
The average age of a teen
who
enters the sex trade
in
the United State is 12 to 14
years old.
Many
of the teens are runaway girls. According to DoSomething.org,
betwe~n 14,500 and 17,500 are trafficked into the United States
every
year and
Page
1
of3
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Economic Impact Statement
Bill ##--17, Concerning: Committee-·on Human Trafficking
California '°ha,rbors three of the FBI's thirteen highest child sex. trafficking areas in
the
nation."
;
In
2016, the Montgomery County Police Department investigated 29 cases of human
i'
trafficking in the County and three involved minors. However, these numbers only
apply
to
those cases
that
a:re:reported and investigated. by the police. According to the
information prqvided
by
fue Com.mission, traffickers use violence, threats, deception
and other manipulative tactics to force or coerce women and men to engage in acts
against their will.
According to
data
provided by
the National Human
Trafficking Hotlinf? regarding
trafficking in the State of Maryland, nearly 540 cases in 2016 were reported to the
national hotline.
Of
those
540
cases,
116
were female victims
and
six were
male
victims, 71 victims were adults and 57 victims were minors. According to a map
provided in the .report, most of the repo1ted trafficking in the state occurred along the
·
Baltimore-Washington corridor.
In preparation for the economic impact statement, the Department ofFinance did not
.
.
develop meastJiable or quantitative assumptions or methodologies. Given the topic of
human trafficking, there is no quantitative analysis or
data of
the economic impact in
the County.
The
only economic assumptions are qualitative. For example, Finance
assumes that the victims of human trafficking have very modest incomes to meet a
certain standard of living and must resort to other sources ofincome and employment
that may result in becoming a victim of human trafficking. Finally, there are no
data
- on the amount ofincome received
by
the victims of human trafficking and fue amount
of income for traffickers. Without detailed data on the incomes of the victims and
traffickers, Finance cannot quantify the economic impacts with any specificity of
human trafficking, particltlarly incomes related to the underground economy related
to
illegal
activitie~.-
2. A description of
any
variable
t~at
could affect the economic
impact
estimates.
The variables that could affect the economic impact are the total number of victims
and traffickers. and fue amount of income,
if
any, they receive from human
trafficking. However, as stated
in
paragraph #1, data the total number and amount
of income
are
not available.
on
3. The Bill's positive or negative effect,
if
any on employment, spending, savings,
investment, incomes, and property values in the County.
Without specific economic
data
on-_the number of victims and traffickers and the
amount of income derived from human trafficking,
it
is difficult to quantify the
impact ofhuman trafficking on the County'·s economy. Without ec-0nomic data
to
determine the employment status of the victims
and
their source of income outside·
human trafficking (i.e., from legitimate economic activity), Finance cannot estimate
Page2 of3
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···-
·1
. J.
i
Economic Impact Statement
Bill ##-17, Concerning: Committee on Human Trafficking
the economic loss to the County's economy through underemployment
by
the victims
through illegitimate economic activity.
4. If
a Bill is likely
to
have no economic impact,
why
is that the case?
Currently, there are
!10
detailed data.to measure the negative impact on the County's
economy.
5. The following contributed to or concurred with this analysis:
David Platt and
.Robeit Hagedoorn, Finance.
Alexandre
A.
Espinosa,. Director
Department of Finance
Page 3 of3
@
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Isiah Leggett
County Executive
Marc P. Hansen
County Attomey
OFFICE OF THE COUNT Y ATTOR NEY
MEMO RAND UM
TO:
VIA:
FROM:
DATE:
Jodi
Finkelstein, Executive Director, Commis sion for Women
Edward B. Lattner, Chief, Division of Governm ent Operations
W-
Kathryn Lloyd, Associate County Attomey")j-\.·,J
i,: .
Xlj)///7,/,I
/\
("L~V
Vv'iJ
(j
l
ell
August l, 2017
Bill 27-17, Human Rights and Civil Liberties - Human Trafficking Prevention
Committee - Established
RE:
I have read and reviewed Bil! 27-17, Human Rights and Civil Libertie s- Human
Trafficking Preventi on Committee - Established, and the bill raises no legal issues. The County
currently has a Human Trafficking Task Force, but the Human Traffick ing Task Force cannot
advise the County Executive or the County Council because it is not a permanent committee
established under County law. The task force also seeks to work with the Commission for
Women to raise and spend money on human trafficking related issues.
Bill 27-17
establishes a permane nt committee, the Human Trafficking Prevention
Committ ee, which consists of 15 voting member s appointe d
by
the County Executiv e subject to
confirma tion by the County Council.
The committee
will have
up
to eight nonvoting
ex
o.bzcio
members.
Bill 27-17
also defines the duties and responsibilities of the Human Trafficking
Prevention Committee.
cc:
Bonnie Kirkland, Assistant Chief Administrative Officer
Marc P. Hansen, County Attorney
Robert H. Drummer, Senior Legislative Attorney
101 Monroe Street, Rockville, Maryland 20850-254 0
(240) 777-6700 • TTD (240) 777-2545 • FAX (240) 777-6705
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TESTilVIONY ON BEHALF OF COUNTY EXECUTIVE ISIAH LEGGETT
ON BILL 27-17, HUMAN RIGHTS AND CIVIL LIBERTIES
-
HUMAN
TRAFFICKJNG PREVENTION COMMITTEE - ESTABLISHED
My name is Jodi Finkelstein, and I serve as the Executive Director of both the
Montgomery County Commission for Women and the County's Human
Trafficking Task Force. I am pleased to be testifying today on behalf of County
Executive Isiah Leggett in support ofBill 27-17.
The Task Force was created in 2014 to increase understanding of the issue of
human trafficking in Montgomery County and to develop interagency coordination
of strategies for response and prevention. The Task Force has suggested that it
become a permanent entity that would function under the auspices of the
Montgomery County Commission for Women.
Despite what many people assume, human trafficking is a significant problem in
Montgomery County. Many traffickers find Montgomery County to be an
especially attractive environment due to its central location and proximity to
affluence and disposable income. A permanent entity will ensure that the County
remains committed to the human trafficking issue on a long-term basis. This bill is
a simple one that will have a long term and positive impact.
Thank you for your continued support of this issue and this bill.
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My name is Elissa Balsley, and I am the Co-President of the Montgomery County chapter of the
National Organization for Women. I am here, today, to add my voice to the support for creating a
permanent Human Trafficking task force. MCNOW has been a part of the task force, since its inception,
with Jeannette Feldner serving as our representative. One of NOW's core issues, is ending violence
against women. While human trafficking affects many different groups, Polaris' statistics from 2016
show that, in the United States, sex trafficking is the most reported type of trafficking, and that women
and girls are 6 times more likely to be the victims in the reported incidents. The ever-changing nature
of human trafficking, makes it vital that there be a permanent task force installed, to best protect the
women and girls, and other victims, in Montgomery County. As always, MCNOW will be here to offer
any support it can, as the task force moves forward.
l)
®
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Testimony of Nicole Y. Drew, Commissioner, Montgomery County Commission for Women - Bill 27-17
Good afternoon. My name is Nicole Drew and I am a Commissioner with the
Mont gome ry County Comm ission for Women. We are an advisory board to
the Coun ty Executive, the County Council, the public, and agencies of the
county, state and federal governments on issues concerning women in
Mont gome ry County. On behal f of the Commission,
I
urge you to pass Bill
No. 27-17 .
Since 2014 , after recognizing the serious need to respond to the prevalence of
huma n trafficking in the County, County Executive Leggett established the
Hum an Trafficking Task Force. Since that time-, the Commission for Women
has work ed diligently with its partners on this task force - a group of
hardw orkin g advocates (both government and non-government entities)
comm itted to combatting the issue of human trafficking in Montgomery
County. The task force provided a diverse group of partners that understand
the impa ct and implementation of laws intended to protect victims, as well as
laws inten ded to deter this type of criminal activity. The proposed bill
conti nues to bring together partners that can provide an ongoing, holistic
appro ach to addressing this issue - from victims' issues to prevention to _
enforcement.
Hum an trafficking has been one of the' Commission for Wom en's top
priorities because it affects large numbers of vulnerable women and children.
Mary land has been deem ed a "hot spot" for this type of criminal activity
becau se of its close proximity to highways and airports. Therefore, the task
canno t stop at a task force; there needs to be continued efforts towards
reduc tion and prevention of this issue
in
our County. This bill will allow the
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No. 27-17
Testim ony of Nicol e Y. Drew, Commissioner, Comm ission for Wom en-Bi ll
2
Hum an Trafficking Prevention Committee to lead a long-tenn focus for the
. County in orde r to properly address the issue.
This bill also will give the Prevention Committee the authority needed to
officially advise the County Executive and the County Council to make
info nned decisions towards prevention. Additionally, with the Prevention
Committee under the auspices of the Commission for Women, it not only
furthers our mission but also effectively and efficiently utilizes the County's
resources. For instance, the Commission for Women's Executive Director
and its Commissioners are already currently supporting the various
prevention efforts of human trafficking through the Task Force.
Therefore, councilmembers, I respectfully urge you to support this bill and
allow the Commission for Wom en to continue its efforts towards the
education, outreach and prevention of human trafficking, and to the needs of
wom en and children in the County. Unfortunately, by its very nature, a task
force is temporary. This is a great time to commit to a long-tenn solution to
prev ent hum an trafficking by supporting this bill that makes this a permanent
committee under the Commission for Women.
Thank you.
(;j)
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Good afternoon Council members. My name is Andrea Powell and I am the founder
and Executive Director of FAIR Girls, a direct services agency providing emergency and
long-term care to human trafficking survivors in the greater metro D.C. area, including
Montgomery County. FAIR Girls is an active member of the Montgomery County Human
Trafficking Task Force, Maryland Human Trafficking Task Force, and the D.C. Human
Trafficking Task Force, as well as, a founding member of the Prince George's County
Task Force. Since 2010, FAIR Girls' staff has co-chaired the training committee of the
D.C. Anti Trafficking Task Force and currently serves as the co-chair of the policy
working group. I am here today in support of Bill 27-17.
Over the last decade, FAIR Girls has served more than 1,000 young women and girls
who have survived human trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation. In 2014,
FAIR Girls opened the Vida Home, a 90-day safe home for young women survivors of
trafficking aged 18 to 26. It is currently the only home of its type in Washington, D.C.
serving this population of survivors. Our Vida Home provides safe shelter and life skills
to 50 girls a year ages 18 to 24. Approximately 50% of the young women we currently
serve are from or were trafficked into Maryland. Approximately 90% of the girls we
serve in the OMV area are girls of color, 70% have or were in the child welfare system, ·
and 80% experienced homelessness prior to being trafficked. Our clients are 10%
immigrants and 20% identify as LGBTQ. They are wrapped up in the child welfare
system and have experienced domestic violence (74%) and child abuse (90%) at
alarming rates. They suffer debilitating bouts of post-traumatic stress disorder,
depression, and suicidal thoughts at exponential rates. Our work focuses on building
deep relationships with trafficking survivors so that they can go from crisis to thriving by
accessing both their individual strengths and talents and desperately needed resources.
It is our experience at FAIR Girls that an active and informed anti-human trafficking task
force is critical in the fight the tide of this modern day slavery that plagues our
communities. Effective task forces, such as the current Montgomery County Human
Trafficking Task Force, focus on four critical areas in an concerted effort to both better
serve individual survivors and systemically combat the crime of human trafficking. First,
training committees, such as the one I co-chair for the D.C. Anti-Trafficking Task Force,
develop and deliver trainings within the community, in particular to frontline responders,
such as law enforcement and medical professionals. At FAIR Girls, approximately 80%
of the young women referred to our safe home were identified by law enforcement.
Thus, without coordinated advocate and survivor-informed training, far fewer victims
would be identified. Second, once victims are identified, it is critical that they receive
coordinated, multi-disciplinary services to ensure their needs are addressed, they
remain safe, and they can begin to rebuild their lives after trafficking. Through our
engagement in the Montgomery County Human Trafficking Task Force, FAIR Girls
®
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works closely and collaboratively with other Maryland direct services providers, such as
SAFE Center and Ayuda. These relationships and coordination built through the
Montgomery County Human Trafficking Task Force better ensure that a survivor is
referred to the most appropriate resources and services. Third, the collective knowledge
and experience of members of an anti-trafficking task force are critical to the
development of survivor-informed policies and legislation. Policies and laws that are
grounded in the lived experiences of trafficking survivors, experiences shared among
members of an engaged and well-rounded task force, will have a better chance of truly
shifting the landscape of the community's response to the needs of survivors. Finally,
anti-trafficking task forces, such as the Montgomery County Human Trafficking Task
Force, are vital to raising public awareness of human trafficking in the jurisdiction where
they operate. This comes in the form of advising and interacting with our public and
government officials, prevention education classes in our schools, p'oster campaigns in
our hotels, and other critical public outreach efforts.
I would like to close by sharing the story of one young woman who is a survivor of
human trafficking whose exploitation took place right here in Montgomery County. In
2014, an 18 year old homeless girl was trafficked from her home state by a seasoned
pimp. Her exploitation spanned four states before she was found by law enforcement in
Montgomery County, identified as a victim not a criminal, and was referred to FAIR Girls
for safe housing. Within 12 hours, she ·was safely housed in our Vida Home, receiving
support and legal protection. Today, she is a thriving college student, gainfully
employed, and looking forward to a life free of exploitation and trafficking. Her road to
recovery will be a lifelong journey, but that recovery may never have begun but for the
coordinated effort of various members of the Montgomery County Human Trafficking
Task Force.
®
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SAFE CENTER
FOR HUMAN TRAFFICKING SURVIVORS
UNIVERSITY
Of
MARYLAND
County Council for Montgomery County, Maryl
and
Testimony before the County Council for Public Hearing
in Support ofBill 27-17
Human Rights and Civil Liberties - Human Trafficking
Prevention Committee-Established
September 19, 2017
Heidi Alvarez, MA
Director of Social Services at University of Maryland SAF
E Center
Co-chair of Human Trafficking Task Force Victim Service
s Committee
Thank you for the opportunity to testify here today in sup
port ofB ill 27-17. My name is
Heidi Alvarez and I am a co-chair of the Montgomery Cou
nty Human Trafficking Task Force
Victim Services Committee. I am also the Director of Soc
ial Services at the University of
Maryland SAFE Center for Human Trafficking Survivors.
The SAFE Center is the first university-based comprehens
ive direct services, research, and
advocacy center on human trafficking.
It
is an initiative
of the University of Maryland, College
Park, and the University of Maryland, Baltimore through
their strategic partnership, MPowering
the State. At the SAFE Center, we provide direct bilingu
al services to survivors of sex and labor
trafficking regardless of nationality, gender, or age. We
were founded by Ambassador Susan
Esserman, who is also the SAFE Center's Director, and
we opened in May of 2016. Our initial
focus is on Montgomery County and Prince George's Cou
nty, with a longer-term focus on the
state of Maryland.
Onsite and through partnerships, the SAFE Center provide
s intensive case management, legal
immigration services, mental health therapy, economic emp
owerment programs, primary
medical care, and food and clothing to human trafficking
survivors. In the 16 months since we
opened our doors, we have received 61 referrals and hav
e served
45
victims of trafficking.
Seventeen of the victims referred to us have been from Mo
ntgomery County or were trafficked
in Montgomery County. They have been U.S. citizens and
foreign nationals, adults and minors.
We know that the victims we are seeing are only the tip
of the iceberg. Trafficking is a
hidden crime because traffickers use violence, threats, and
coercion to prevent their victims from
seeking help. Now that the SAFE Center is more fully ope
rational, we expect to see more
Montgomery County clients as we do broader outreach
and deepen our involvement in this
county.
The Montgomery County Human Trafficking Task Force
is vitally important for bringing
human trafficking victims out of the shadows. The task
force raises awareness about human
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 923 College Park, MD 20741 •
301.314.7233 (SAFE)• umdsafccenter.org
@
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S.AFE CE NT ER
FOR HUNAN TRAFFICKING
SURVIVORS
M~DVrfllHNG
TH[
ST/.H:
UNJVERSffY OF
MARY LAND
trafficking in the county. It also works to help close gaps in victim services by coordinatin
g the
count y's service providers and law enforcement resources.
Bill 27-17 will strengthen the task force' s efforts to address huma n trafficking
in
the count
y
by making the
task
force a permanent committee able to officially advise the County Execu
tive
and Council, and able to work with the Commission for Women to raise neede d funds for
huma n
trafficking related issues.
For all of these reasons, the SAFE Center supports the passage ofBil l 27-17. Thank you
again for your time and attention to this vital issue.
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 923 College Park, MD 20741 • 301.314.7233 (SAFE) • umdsafecenter.or
g
@